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COOTES, MARY (Mary Elizabeth Dickson Cootes)
United States
Born 09 May, 1912 in Norfolk, Virginia
Died 10 January 1996 in Washington, DC
Married to Peter Belin (1913-1982) in 1939
3 sons and 1 daughter.
[Active from at least 1938 to 1948]

Belin participated in the 1946 French.

Note name is Cootes and NOT Coates. Mary's husband Peter was a survivor of the famous 1936 Hindenburg disaster. Mary qualified for the main draw ar Wimbledon in 1938, losing on Centre Court to Alice Marble. She went on to play the Championships in 1946 and 1948.

A blog post on the Hindenburg provides information on Mary:

Mary Cootes had been born on May 9, 1912, in Norfolk, VA and her father, Harry Newton Cootes, was a colonel in the U.S. Cavalry and had been commandant of Fort Myers from 1930 to 1933. Mary had been educated in Vienna, where her father was a military attache after the First World War, and went on to study at the Sorbonne in Paris and graduated cum laude from Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. Fluent in several languages, Mary Cootes worked as a translator for the U.S. State Department and served in that capacity at a number of international conferences, including the International Radio Commission at Lisbon, Spain in 1934 and again in Cairo, Egypt in 1938. She continued her translator duties after her marriage to Peter Belin, serving in the various countries in which he was stationed.

[From Washington Post obit]

MARY ELIZABETH DICKSON COOTES BELIN Board Member and Tennis Player

Mary Elizabeth Dickson Cootes Belin, 83, who played tennis in tournaments at Wimbledon and Forest Hills in the 1930s and later served on the boards of organizations in Washington, died Jan. 10 at her home, the Georgetown estate of Evermay. She had Parkinson's disease.

Mrs. Belin was founding director of the Washington Performing Arts Society and served on the boards of Children's Hospital and the National Symphony. She was a founder of the Friends of the Kennedy Center and served as regional chairman for the Metropolitan Opera auditions. She also was a founder of the Washington Area Tennis Patrons Foundation and City Tavern in Georgetown.

Mrs. Belin was born in Norfolk into an Army family and raised in this country and abroad. She was a cum laude graduate of Smith College and also studied at the Sorbonne. She was a translator for the State Department in Europe and the Mideast in the 1930s, when she also played in tennis tournaments in this country and Europe.

After her marriage in 1939 to Peter Belin, she accompanied him to Navy posts in London, Paris and Rome.

Mrs. Belin was regent at large at Gunston Hall and a member of the Garden Club of America, the Georgetown Garden Club and the Colonial Dames of America.

Capt. Belin died in 1982, and three children also predeceased her: Beverly Belin in 1951, Alan Belin in 1966 and Peter Graham Belin in 1990. Survivors include a son, Harry Lammot Belin of Washington; a brother, Merritt Newton Cootes of Princeton, N.J.; and three grandchildren.

Sources:

http://facesofthehindenburg.blogspot.com/2009/01/peter-belin.html

[Obituary from the Washington Post on 16 January 1996]
https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/local/1996/01/16/obituaries/2160e0f8-008a-4103-a95c-ce72c8867297/

https://scholar.lib.vt.edu/VA-news/VA-Pilot/issues/1996/vp960120/01200241.htm

http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/scores/draws/archive/pdfs/players/2fd7afb5-2811-4559-b8bb-72f356420244_LS.pdf

[Thanks to Rollo for this information]
 

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CORBETT, NANCY
United States
Born 20 February 1924 in Chicago, Illinois
Died 19 November 2011 in River Forest, Illinois
Married Robert "Lefty" Dillon, early 1948, deceased 1956
[Active 1939-1947]

Part of the Rollins tennis team that included Pauline Betz. Corbett attended Rollins on a full scholarship, rare at that time for women. Corbett won the 1943 US Clay courts with Betz in doubles ad was runner-up in the singles.

Marriage and motherhood put an end to traveling extensively on tour, but Nancy played the USCC every year from 1958 till 1963, held mostly in her hometown of River Forest

[Obituary from the Chicago Tribune below]

Nancy Corbett Dillon, 1924-2011

College tennis star went on to become high school teacher, River Forest village trustee

November 23, 2011|By Joan Giangrasse Kates, Special to the Tribune

Nancy Corbett Dillon was an accomplished tennis player who during college played with the likes of Jack Kramer and Shirley Fry and whose accomplishments on the court included a 1943 U.S. National Clay Court doubles title.

Widowed at age 32 with five sons under age 8, Mrs. Dillon taught social studies to grade school and later high school students for nearly three decades. After retiring from teaching, she was elected a River Forest village trustee at age 65 and served for 20 years until 2009.

"Nancy was everything you'd want in a public servant," said Frank Paris, River Forest village president from 1993 to 2003. "She was hardworking, thoughtful and very outspoken. There was never any doubt as to what she was thinking. But she was also someone who'd quietly sit back and listen to what others had to say."

Mrs. Dillon, 87, died of complications from cancer Saturday, Nov. 19, in her River Forest home.

In addition to teaching at Proviso East and Proviso West high schools, Mrs. Dillon taught tennis for decades.

"I think half the people in River Forest learned tennis from her," said her daughter-in-law Sandra Dillon. "She was a wonderful player and teacher."
Born in Chicago, the former Nancy Corbett was 5 when her family moved to Oak Park. She was a graduate of Trinity High School in River Forest, where in her freshman year she began playing tennis, even though at the time it was not an organized sport.

"She was 14 years old the first time she picked up a racket, and that changed her life," said her youngest son, Jack.
Mrs. Dillon rose through the ranks to become one of the top-ranked junior players in the country and received a full scholarship to Rollins College in Florida, a haven for tennis players, including such greats as Kramer and Fry.

In 1943, she teamed with Pauline Betz, a college teammate from Los Angeles, to win the U.S. National Clay Court Championships in Detroit. Mrs. Dillon almost made it a sweep at the tournament but lost to Betz in the women's singles final.

During her years competing, Mrs. Dillon also played against Fry, who at one point was ranked No. 1 in the world.

Mrs. Dillon returned to the Chicago area after college and worked for a short time at the Leo Burnett advertising agency as a researcher before marrying Robert Dillon, her high school sweetheart and a cardiologist, in 1948. He died in 1956 apparently of a heart attack.
"Suddenly she was the sole parent of five children, the youngest just a year old," her daughter-in-law said. "But she was very much a disciplinarian. She got her boys into sports and kept them focused on their studies."

While raising her sons in River Forest, Mrs. Dillon got a master's degree in education from Northeastern Illinois State College and then became a grade school teacher in the western suburbs. On weekends and during the summer, she taught tennis at the River Forest Park District, Oak Park Tennis Club and River Forest Tennis Club.

In 1960, Mrs. Dillon began teaching social studies at Proviso East High School in Maywood and later joined the staff at Proviso West High School in Hillside. She retired from teaching in 1984.

From 1989 to 2009, Mrs. Dillon served on the River Forest Village Board, where she spearheaded efforts to improve emergency care service for residents.

"Because of Nancy, we began training our emergency personnel as paramedics, and the community greatly benefited from this," Paris said. "She helped save countless lives."

Mrs. Dillon lived for 55 years on Forest Avenue in River Forest, which this year was named Honorary Nancy Dillon Way for her years of service to the village.

"I think of all those years she taught school, taught tennis and was a village trustee," her son said. "But the amazing thing is that she never missed a Little League game or school play. She made sure she was there for us."

She is also survived by four other sons, Robert, Jr., David, Stephen and Daniel; 15 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.
Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Wednesday in St. Luke Catholic Church, 528 Lathrop Ave., River Forest.



Rollins Tennis Team - New York Times. Feb.1, 1942 Pauline Betz (far left), Nancy Corbett, Peggy Welch, Jane Metcalf, Dorothy Bundy (far right)

Sources:

Nancy Dillon, tennis player and village trustee, dies - tribunedigital-chicagotribune

http://www.oakpark.com/News/Articles/11-21-2011/Tennis-star,-former-River-Forest-trustee-Nancy-Dillon-dies-at-87/

Rollins College Women's Tennis: Small School With A Big Tradition | Sports Then and Now

Illinois General Assembly - Full Text of SR0474

[Thanks to Rollo for this information]
 

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CORBIERE, ELIZABETH (nee Elizabeth Louise Barber)
United States
Born 12 November 1898
Died 26 February 1974
Married James Dallas Corbiere, circa 1925
JD Corbiere was born Oct 1887 in Morristown, New Jersey
[Active 1925-1928]

Often listed as Mrs JD Corbiere. Name with 1 R, not 2. CORBIERE, ELIZABETH (nee Elizabeth Louise Barber)
United States
Born 12 November 1898
Died 26 February 1974
Married James Dallas Corbiere, circa 1925
JD Corbiere was born Oct 1887 in Morristown, New Jersey

Often listed as Mrs JD Corbiere. Name with 1 R, not 2. May have been nicknamed Betty. Ellice Endcicott was her usual doubles partner-they won the 1925 US Indoors and played the Riviera together in 1928.

Ranked #6 in the US for 1926 and 1927. In 1928 she was ranked #10 in the US.

Sources:

Special to The New York Times Times Wide,World Photo. "MRS. COLE TRIUMPHS IN TITLE NET UPSET." New York Times (1923-Current file): 34. Mar 25 1931. ProQuest. Web. 11 Oct. 2016 . [Includes a photo]

[Thanks to Rollo for this information]
 

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CORDER, JANE (Jane Maria Corder)
United Kingdom
Born 1874 in Newcastle, Northumberland, England
Died 29 September 1965 in Edinburgh, Scotland
Married John Wardle Donald (died 1906) from Apil to June of 1899
[Active 1893 to 1895]

Miss Corder won the 1893 Scottish Chmps and Boulogne-sur-Mer. In 1895 she won the Welsh Championships. She was a native of Northumberland.

Mr Donald was an architect.

[Thanks to Newmark and Rollo for this information]
 

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CORNELL, LORNA (Lorna M Cornell)
Born 3 January 1933
Married (1) John W “Peter” Cawthorn 18 February 1953 in Kensington, London. Tennis coach. Divorced by Wimbledon 1966
Married (2) WD Greville-Collins. Md by Wimbledon 1966.
Married (3) Anthony Densham circa July to September 1971

Lorna came from athletic genes: Her mother set a record in about 1928 for women in the long jump at 19 feet 2 1/2 inches. The record still stood in 1949.

Athletics Weekly (23rd October 2014) reported that Muriel Cornell was inducted into England Athletics Hall of Fame. Muriel was the world record holder for the long jump and 80m hurdles in the 1920s and was the mother of Lorna Cornell. Induction ceremony was held at Birmingham on 18th October. Lorna accepted award of behalf of her mother.

Won the Wimbledon junior title in 1949 and 1950

Played 3 months in 1952 with a fractured right arm until an x-ray was taken. Md first to her coach Peter Cawthorn, an Australian player. The couple went to have 3 daughters. Lorna fit tennis in even after childbirth.

Lorna in 1953 with her fist husband
172739


Lorna appeared in a few editions of Australian Tennis modelling some of the latest Wimbledon wear. In a British Pathe clip from 1955 she is modeling tennis wear for Ted Tinling:
Beach And Tennis Wear - British Pathé

Wimbledon record (entered 1950-1952, 1954 to 1957, and 1959 to 1968)

Singles: 9-17 (made the 4R in 1951 and 1963)
Doubles: 5-12
Mixed: 6-7

1967 Hurlingham garden party. Lorna is on the far left.
172738


Sources:
A tennis journey in the Fifties: John (Peter) Cawthorn

Source Lawn Tennis and Badminton 1st March 1953

[Thanks to Rollo for this biography and to Rosamund for more on this player]
 

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CORONADO, “CARMEN” (Mari Carmen Hernandez Coronado)
Spain/Brazil
Born 16 June 1940
Married José Edison “Eddy” or “Ed” Mandarino (b 1941) on 06 November 1965 in Madrid
[Active 1959-1973]

Spanish National Champion 1964, 1967, 1970-1972
From Madrid. Carmen's rival as Spanish #1 for most of the 1960s was Pilar Barril. Carmen won numerous clay court events in Europe, mostly events of the second tier variety.

She was sometimes listed as representing Brazil by virtue of her marriage to Ed Mandarino. Carmen only played Federation Cup for Spain however, from 1972-1974 and finally in 1977. 1974 and 1977 were doubles only.

Spanish top ten rankings (incomplete)

1959: #6
1960: #4
1961: #3
1969: #2
1970: #1
1972: #1

Carmen Coronado (alone then at left) at the 1965 player party at Hurlingham. To her right are Maria Bueno, Helga Schultze and Madonna Schacht





Sources:

World Tennis January 1966 (source for marriage)
https://www.fedcup.com/en/players/player.aspx?id=800173886

[Thanks to Rollo and Rosamund for this information]
 

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COUCHMAN, “JOAN” (Phyllis Joan Couchman)
United Kingdom
Born 25 February 1909 in Eastbourne, East Sussex
Died 31 January 1998 in Norway.
Married Charles T Ennals, 10 March 1934

In 1932 Wimbledon draw.

[Thanks to Newmark for information on this player.
 

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ROLLIN COUQUERQUE, “MADZY” (Magdalena Ferdinanda Maria Rollin Couquerque)
Netherlands
Born 14 April 1903 S'Gravenhage, Netherlands
Died 16 July 1994 S'Gravenhage, Netherlands
Never Married
[Active 1923-1959]

Often listed simply as Rollin-Couquerque, she was by far the best Dutch female before World War Two after Kea Bouman. For most of the 1930s Madzy reigned as the Dutch #1. Played Wimbledon 15 times from 1928 to 1951-her best result was the 4R in 1937.

Rollin Couquerque shone at the French despite bad luck with draws. She made the QF on her first entry in 1928-going down 6-2 6-0 to the invincible Helen Wills. Not entering again until 1932-she was unlucky to draw Wills again, pushing the world #1 to 6-4 6-2. In 1934 the Dutch woman stretched Peggy Scriven to 2-6 6-4 6-3 in their 2R encounter. Scriven went on to take the title.

Seeded #7 in 1938, Madzy went all the way to the semifinals. Belgian Nelly Adamson won 6-2 6-4. This was the highlight of her tennis career in a slam event.

Titles

Spanish International-1929

Dutch National Singles (14 times winner) 1927-30, 1932-1935, 1938-1942, and 1947

French Championships record (entered 1928, 1932-1939, and 1947)

Singles: 12-10 (QF 1928 and 1935. SF in 1938)
Doubles (QF 1934, 1935)

Wimbledon record (entered 1928-1930, 1932-39, 1946-48, 1951)

Singles: 12-15 (4R in 1937)
Doubles: 10-13 (QF in 1929 w/Kea Bouman)
Mixed: 10-12

[What follows below is a condensed version from her thread]

Madzy Rollin Couquerque grew up with her brother, Louis, in a family which belonged to one of the better social circles in the Hague. She came into contact with sports through her classmates in secondary school in the Hague. It was above all at the boarding school in Bloemendaal, where her father sent her in 1918 after the death of his wife, that Madzy’s sporting talents became apparent. She excelled at hockey and tennis, two sports which at that time were played together for obvious reasons. In April the tennis courts were opened, while the hockey competitions began in September.

Rollin Couquerque’s authoritarian father showed no interest in and provided no support in relation to sport, which for him was a subject not to be spoken about and one on which he looked down with disdain. Soon after being complimented on Madzy’s success at a meeting of the men’s club called De Witte he made his way one Sunday to the tennis courts. After watching a game for a short time he left again without even having seen his daughter play. This failure on her father’s part to recognize her talents wounded Rollin Couquerque deeply, and the memory of it could still hurt her in old age.

From 1921, the year in which she returned from boarding school, Rollin Couquerque worked in various administrative positions. However, these jobs were only a means of financing her sporting activities. For her, sport was more than a leisure time activity – it was her life. She shone at it and here received the recognition she thought would otherwise be withheld from her. Rollin Couquerque would continue to do office work as a necessary evil until she retired. Even after her sporting career was over she continued to think of office work in this way and avoided talking about it even with her closest friends.

Rollin Couquerque was naturally talented at sport. In 1921, she became a member of the first team of the HOC hockey club, which won the Dutch championships. The HOC remained unbeatable and national champion without interruption until 1935. Rollin Couquerque also took part in the first trans-national hockey tournament in Brussels in 1926. Due to her height and her great hitting power, she was easily able to see over the field and play the ball forward. She was captain of the team in the 1930s.

The series of victories of “Ms Rollin Couquerque” – as she had herself styled – as a tennis player began rather late. Gerard Scheurleer, a famous coach at the time and related to Rollin Couquerque by marriage, saw his niece playing and took her under his wing. His pupil had a great deal of talent, but not much technique or tactics. Due to the helpful lessons she received, in 1927 she won the national ladies’ singles title, the first in a series of forty national championships she carried off in 25 years. The years 1932-1935 above all were glorious – Rollin Couquerque became national champion in the singles, doubles and mixed doubles. She also won the triple in 1938, 1939, 1940 and 1942. In 1933, according to an opinion poll, she was the most popular sportswoman in the country after the female swimmer Willemijntje “Willy” den Ouden.

In her glory years Rollin Couquerque played at Wimbledon seven times, but was never able to reach the final. She herself attributed this lack of success to the circumstances in which she had to travel to the tournament.

As a working woman, Rollin Couquerque could only really play her sports on Saturday afternoons and Sundays. She hardly trained at all, at most once in the middle of the week, and thus depended on her talent and experience.

The war drew a line under Rollin Couquerque’s double set of international sporting activities. In March 1940 she played her last hockey competition in Brussels. In tennis she won another eight national titles in the first three years of the war, something she liked to joke about as she got older.

From 1947 to 1950 Madzy was in the Dutch East Indies as part of the Women’s Marine Department (WMD) founded at the end of 1944. With the rank of WMD officer, second class – the equivalent of a junior grade lieutenant – Rollin Couquerque originally acted as an assistant to recruits in the department centre in Windsor in England. In 1946, she was appointed division head in Amsterdam. One year later she left for the Dutch East Indies to take up a leading position in the WMD department located there.

After her period of service had ended – she had signed up for five years – Rollin Couquerque returned to the Netherlands in 1950 after stopping off for one year in Australia, where she helped Dutch immigrants to get settled.

She was to become a tennis champion twice more, in 1948 in mixed doubles with H. Wilton, and in 1951 in ladies’ doubles with E. van Berkel. She thus increased her total of national tennis titles to forty.

After 1950, Rollin Couquerque remained active for years as a hockey player at the HOC club, and also in club competitions at the Leimonias tennis club. However, this did not completely fulfil her; she thought it beneath her to play at such a level.

In 1956 Rollin Couquerque entered the Australian Nationals on a return trip from Indonesia. She thus entered 3 of the 4 major events in tennis-only missing out on competing at the US Nationals.

This is why in August 1959, at the age of 56, she decided to register for the ladies’ singles event at the Dutch national tennis championships. With unchanged tactical insight, powerful strokes and a great deal of variation she overcame much amazement – and fear – to beat one opponent after the other. Only in the final did she bow to Mientje Vletter-Tettelaar, who was half her age and who used her youth to control the tempo of the match. A very disappointed Rollin Couquerque left the court at the end. However, her appearance at the event had made a deep impression. A report in the “Algemeen Dagblad” newspaper of 22 August 1959 stated that she was “a beacon towards which young Dutch players must set their course if the Netherlands ever wants to return to the international tennis scene”.

Madzy Rollin Couquerque died in Gravenhage on 16 July 1994 at the age of 91.



Sources:

Magdalena Rollin Coquerque (1903-1994) - An early Dutch sports star
Magdalena Rollin Coquerque (1903-1994) - An early Dutch sports star - TennisForum.com

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madzy_Rollin_Couquerque
https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madzy_Rollin_Couquerque

Archive - Draws Archive : Rollin Couquerque - 2015 Wimbledon Championships Website - Official Site by IBM

UK Incoming Passenger Lists 1878 to 1960.
Sydney to London Stratheden arrival 1st November 1956
Web:Netherlands Genealogie online Trees Index 1000- Current

www.ancestry.co.uk

[Thanks to Rosamund for this information]
 

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COURT, MARGARET (nee Margaret Smith)
Australia
Born 16 July, 1942 in Albury, NSW, Australia
Married Barry Michael Court, 28 October 1967 in Perth
Nicknames: “The Arm”
Height: 5' 9" (1.75 m)
[Active 1958-1977]

Won the Grand Slam in singles (1970) and mixed doubles (1963) with Ken Fletcher-the only female to have won it in two disciplines. With 24 singles slams and 64 total (24 in singles, 19 in doubles, and 21 in mixed) she leads these categories among all women.

Australia's greatest ever women's champion; she can also lay a strong claim to being the greatest female ever. Aided by superior athletic ability and training, she was ahead of her time in using weights to train.

All-time leader in singles majors (at 24) and in the total title count (64). With at least 193 confirmed singles titles she also leads among modern women, though Elizabeth Ryan is the all-time leader. If that isn't enough to cement her status among the pantheon of greats Margaret captured the Grand Slam in 1970.

Son Danny born 06 March 1972.

In 1970-the year of her Grand Slam



From the 1960s



Sources:

Hedges, Martin. Encyclopedia of Tennis. Pages 68-70.

Margaret Court's Full Title Haul - TennisForum.com
Margaret Court's record - TennisForum.com
Margaret Smith Court - TennisForum.com
 

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COURTIE, “FLO” DE LA (Florence de la Courtie)
France
Born 13 November 1935
Married F Billat in 1962
[Active in the late 1950s and 1960s]

Her name appears in the 1972 doubles draw at Roland Garros, but she scratched.
 

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COUSIN, GENEVIEVE
France
[Active 1920-1927]

Ranked #12 in France for 1921. In 1924 she entered the mixed doubles at the French Nationals with Marcel Couisin, probably a brother or male relative.

Mlle Cousin at St Cloud in 1922

 
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