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What's your favorite kind of music?


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Discussion Starter #101
My favorite French melancholia and I might call this avantgarde rather than new wave.
Rate Your Music has it in Coldwave, which is defined as such:

Coldwave is a style of Post-Punk music that originated in Europe in the late 1970s and early 1980s and is known for its generally dark, gloomy (thus "cold") atmosphere and heavy reliance on synthesizers. It was popular predominantly in continental Europe (especially in France, Poland, and Belgium) and consisted largely of bands that were heavily influenced by British post-punk acts such as Joy Division and Siouxsie and The Banshees (and these British acts are sometimes referred to as coldwave in those countries).

Whereas Polish coldwave bands such as Siekiera were more directly influenced by guitar-driven post-punk music, French and Belgian artists such as Clair Obscur and Siglo XX incorporated more synths and electronics and crossed over heavily with Minimal Wave and Minimal Synth. Due to the frequent genre-bending nature of these bands, it can be sometimes difficult to classify bands as strictly coldwave, post-punk, or minimal synth, but all of the artists in the coldwave scene shared a dark, cold, and metallic atmosphere and incorporated both guitars and synths.

:hatoff:
 

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Rate Your Music has it in Coldwave, which is defined as such:

Coldwave is a style of Post-Punk music that originated in Europe in the late 1970s and early 1980s and is known for its generally dark, gloomy (thus "cold") atmosphere and heavy reliance on synthesizers. It was popular predominantly in continental Europe (especially in France, Poland, and Belgium) and consisted largely of bands that were heavily influenced by British post-punk acts such as Joy Division and Siouxsie and The Banshees (and these British acts are sometimes referred to as coldwave in those countries).

Whereas Polish coldwave bands such as Siekiera were more directly influenced by guitar-driven post-punk music, French and Belgian artists such as Clair Obscur and Siglo XX incorporated more synths and electronics and crossed over heavily with Minimal Wave and Minimal Synth. Due to the frequent genre-bending nature of these bands, it can be sometimes difficult to classify bands as strictly coldwave, post-punk, or minimal synth, but all of the artists in the coldwave scene shared a dark, cold, and metallic atmosphere and incorporated both guitars and synths.

:hatoff:
Should have read your post better :eek:
 

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Yeah, definition helps me find similar sorts but often confuses me at the same time.
Irresistible charm about those tunes around that time (circa 80, before my generation) immediately remind me of black and white visual arts from the world war era.
 

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Discussion Starter #106 (Edited)
What's called Baroque Pop?

Rate Your Music:

Baroque pop is a style of Pop that emerged in the mid 1960s when several Pop Rock recording artists began incorporating elements of Western Classical Music into their music. Many pop songs by then had already made use of instruments previously associated with classical music, such as harpsichord and strings, but baroque pop was distinguished for its majestic, melancholic sound that was more reminiscent of the Baroque Music of the 17th-18th century.

To explain, baroque music usually has constant rhythmic flow (or steady motion), a single melodic idea that develops throughout, and counterpoint (two separate melodies that sometimes intersect). Baroque pop does not preclude non-classical instruments like guitars, electric organ, and/or drum kits, but its orchestral qualities are always placed in the arrangement's foreground.

Popular examples are The Left Banke's "Walk Away Renée", The Beach Boys' "God Only Knows", and The Beatles' "Eleanor Rigby", all of which feature a string quartet. Others, like The Zombies' "Care of Cell 44" and Procol Harum's "A Whiter Shade of Pale", do not contain any classical instrumentation, but are still situated in the style due to their baroque-like features (the former's vocal counterpoints and harpsichord-sounding tack piano, and the latter's Bach-inspired organ melodies that play throughout the song).

The genre largely fell in decline after the 1960s. Some of its characteristics would later be incorporated in the work of some Chamber Folk and Chamber Pop artists.

Top Albums:




  1. The Beach Boys - Pet Sounds (1966)
  2. Scott Engel - Scott 4 (1969)
  3. Weyes Blood - Titanic Rising (2019)
  4. The Moody Blues With The London Festival Orchestra - Days of Future Passed (1967)
  5. The Left Banke - Walk Away Renée / Pretty Ballerina (1967)
Weyes Blood is a band led by the singer songwriter Natalie Mering. Titanic Rising is the third LP, released last April. It's Top 2 on the RYM album charts this year. Here's a live performance of the song "Movies":

 

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Discussion Starter #107
What's called Indie Pop?

Indie Pop is genre characterized by pop conventions and structure, and a melodic, lighthearted sound. Artists generally use typical rock instrumentation (drums, guitar, bass, vocals), although some artists deviate from this, sometimes including electronics, piano, strings, or even eschewing guitar altogether.

Indie Pop artists tend to have a seemingly primitive and simplistic approach to music, taking many cues from punk's DIY ethos. The genre is inspired by the music of The Velvet Underground, 1960s pop music, Power Pop, and Post-Punk.

The genre came to fruition thanks to bands such as Television Personalities and The Go-Betweens, and gained momentum thanks to C86. Important U.K. bands include early Primal Scream, The Smiths, Belle and Sebastian, The Field Mice and many artists on Sarah Records.

Around the 1990s, Indie Pop began to gain a following in the United States of America. Key Indie Pop bands popped up thanks to this, including Beat Happening, The Magnetic Fields, and Tiger Trap, and labels specializing in Indie Pop such as K Records began to appear.

Top albums:



  1. The Magnetic Fields - 69 Love Songs (1999)
  2. Vampire Weekend - Modern Vampires of the City (2013)
  3. The Shins - Chutes Too Narrow (2003)
  4. Eels - Electro-Shock Blues (1998)
  5. Grandaddy - The Sophtware Slump (2000)
Indie Pop has three sub-genres: C86, Chamber Pop, Twee Pop. The latest two have their fans. More below.
 

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Discussion Starter #108
Chamber Pop

Chamber pop (also known as ork-pop, short for "orchestral pop") is a genre that grew among indie artists in the early to mid 1990s, largely as a reaction against the decade's Lo-Fi Indie and Alternative Rock movements. Chamber pop's influences drew from the more lush 1960s work of artists like Burt Bacharach, Brian Wilson, and Lee Hazlewood. In opposition to the Rock and Electronic genres of the 1990s, its style foregrounds richly textured, orchestral arrangements with a renewed emphasis on melody and production, featuring instruments like strings and horns. Some example artists are The High Llamas, Louis Philippe, Plush, and Belle and Sebastian.

The style may occasionally overlap with Baroque Pop, which has a similar (but fundamentally different) orchestral pop focus. This is distinguished whenever the music borrows some qualities from Baroque Music, like constant rhythm, multiple interlocking melodies, prominent harpsichord, etc.

Chamber pop should not be confused with most 21st century Art Pop by the likes of Björk, AURORA, or Goldfrapp (those of whom are not firmly rooted in any Lounge/pop styles from the 1960s).

Top albums:




  1. Sufjan Stevens - Illinois (2005)
  2. Belle and Sebastian - If You're Feeling Sinister (1996)
  3. Tindersticks (1993)
  4. Antony and the Johnsons - I Am a Bird Now (2005)
Twee Pop

Twee Pop, as a genre, is more or less applied retroactively to bands part of the Indie Pop movement of the 80s and early 90s. Used at first in an almost derogatory fashion, the word "twee", meaning overly quaint or cute, was applied by commentators who saw a "revolt into childhood" demonstrated by its practitioners. Musically, it can be characterized by jangling guitars with a distinct Post-Punk background and 60s Pop influence, similarly with other Indie Pop acts, but also with a more noticeable theme of innocent and amorous subject matter. UK label Sarah Records and US label K Records have exerted the most influence upon the genre. Notable bands include Beat Happening, The Field Mice, Tiger Trap, Heavenly, and Belle and Sebastian.

Top albums




  1. Kero Kero Bonito - Time 'n' Place (2018)
  2. Beat Happening - You Turn Me On (1992)
  3. Dolly Mixture - Demonstration Tapes (1983)
  4. Camera Obscura - Let's Get Out of This Country (2006)
I consider myself a fan of Twee Pop. I've played the first album listed above and don't like it much, though. So it doesn't mean necessarily that I like anything that is described as "twee pop". But a lot of Twee Pop stuff is right my alley. Dolly Mixture and Camera Obscura are bands I can play a lot without being sick of it. And I could mention a lot of other bands I adore in the genre: Tiger Trap and most of anything Rose Melberg did. Anything Amelia Fletcher did (Talulah Gosh, Heavenly, Tender Trap), Allo Darlin', Cub, The School...
 

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Seeing these lists, it seems like I am a fan of Chamber Pop and not a fan of Twee Pop. However, I've listened to a lot less Twee Pop so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #110
Seeing these lists, it seems like I am a fan of Chamber Pop and not a fan of Twee Pop. However, I've listened to a lot less Twee Pop so far.
Knowing a bit of your taste I guess you'd reject the too cute and sugary aspect of twee pop (I recall you dislike The School, and I adore them), but you may enjoy the *rushed unconscious* (for lack of better adjectives) aspect of some (Tiger Trap, they made only one album).
 

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Knowing a bit of your taste I guess you'd reject the too cute and sugary aspect of twee pop (I recall you dislike The School, and I adore them), but you may enjoy the *rushed unconscious* (for lack of better adjectives) aspect of some (Tiger Trap, they made only one album).
I remember liking Beat Happening, but not sure if that's really "Twee Pop".
 

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Discussion Starter #113
What is Ambient Pop?

Typified by its distinct combination of Ambient sound design and Pop music structures, ambient pop emerged in the wake of Dream Pop and Synthpop during the mid 1980s. Though frequently associated with dream pop, ambient pop sets itself apart from its predecessor by not being directly related to the Alternative Rock movement and incorporating a greater variation of styles ranging from Downtempo, Jazz Pop and Krautrock to even Drone.

Ambient pop's sound is often based around multi-layered atmospheric Electronic instruments such as pads and synthesizers. Vocalists tend to sing in a shimmering, ethereal way and the addition of acoustic instruments is not uncommon, mainly keyboards, strings sections, drums and clean guitar.

The varied and unclear definition of ambient pop leads to close resemblance to Art Pop, with many artists falling into both categories, but these should not be treated as the same genre, as ambient pop focuses mostly on calm, slow pop music, rather than the complexity found in art pop works. Important artists include David Sylvian, Deux filles and Julee Cruise.

Top single of the genre was released this year:


Top albums




  1. Lewis - L'Amour (1983)
  2. Steve Hiett - Down on the Road by the Beach (1983)
  3. Flaming Tunes (1985, cassette)

What's Easy Listening?

Easy Listening is a form of typically instrumental, lush pop music played by orchestras and big bands for light entertainment. It peaked in the late 1950s and in the 1960s. The repertory often includes Pop, Standards, Jazz, Classical Music or Folk themes being played in light instrumental versions. Sometimes a choir is featured. Some artists also contribute original and new compositions.

Easy Listening has several subgenres: Exotica, Light Music, Lounge, Pops Orchestra and Space Age Pop.

Top albums:




  1. Mort Garson - Mother Earth's Plantasia (1976)
  2. Antena - Camino del sol (1982)
 

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Discussion Starter #114
Blue-Eyed Soul

Blue-eyed soul is Pop with an affinity for R&B or Soul and usually refers to a pop or Pop Rock song that contains strong Gospel-like elements.

The style is best exemplified by the music of The Righteous Brothers ("You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'") and The Walker Brothers ("The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine Any More"). Both were singers who gave soulful performances over highly orchestral music that found unexpected crossover success on R&B radio stations of the 1960s. Because they were white, they were referred to as "blue-eyed soul", a reflection of that era's racial division.

Most praised albums of the genre:




  1. Elvis Presley - From Elvis in Memphis (1969)
  2. Redskins - Neither Washington Nor Moscow... (1986)
You may wonder "where is Dusty Springfield?"

Well, it appears that she belongs to Pop Soul, a category of Soul music. Depending on the album, of course.

Girl Group

Girl Group is a genre of Pop music that combines elements of Rhythm & Blues, Rock & Roll, and Traditional Pop music, and is typically performed by trios or quartets of female vocalists. The style is typified by a lead singer accompanied by loose backing harmonies.

Girl Group originated with late 1950s Doo-Wop groups such as The Bobbettes and The Chantels, and was popularized in the early to mid 1960s by groups such as The Shirelles, The Crystals, The Ronettes, and The Shangri-Las. It is strongly identified with the style of Brill Building pop songwriters such as Goffin & King and Barry & Greenwich and innovative producers such as Phil Spector. Several notable artists also recorded in this style as solo artists, such as Darlene Love and Lesley Gore.

This synergy of popular styles was a strong influence on the songwriting and production of influential artists such as The Beatles and The Beach Boys.

Original LPs:




  1. The Supremes - Where Did Our Love Go (1964)
  2. The Shangri-Las - Shangri-Las-65! (1965)
One of my favorite genres. You may wonder where the Ronettes are in the albums list: well, at the very top of the genre but Spector did a Christmas album featuring the Ronettes and others one year before that is hailed as his very best (and belongs to... Christmas Music!). That Shangri-Las album in the list ain't worth it. They only released two original albums in 1965 before parting ways. The compilation is the way to go with them (for their string of fabulous singles). That Supremes album on the other hand has been superbly reissued to CD, mono and stereo. A delight. Motown has done a great job at reissuing their catalog by the way. Digipack CDs of Marvin Gaye, Four Tops, Marvelettes, etc. Hard to beat.
 

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Discussion Starter #115
French Pop

RYM don't have a definition for French Pop. I guess it's all Pop Music that is French sounding. :grin2:

In my opinion, if I want to define it, it's French music influenced by English music (US and UK), unlike French chanson. But since French artists come from their own culture (cabaret, folk, classical), when they switch to the English sound it comes with a French touch (not to speak of their language I guess).

Top albums




  1. Serge Gainsbourg - Histoire de Melody Nelson (1971)
  2. Françoise Hardy [La question] (1971)
  3. Jacques Dutronc (1966)
So what about Yé-yé?

Yé-yé is a style of sunny, upbeat Pop music that emerged in Southern Europe in the early 1960s. It primarily developed as a musical craze throughout France, but also in Spain, Portugal and Italy. Many singers during the start of the movement used the French radio show Salut les Copains (specifically the Le chouchou de la Semaine music showcase section) as a springboard to success in yé-yé music. The sound was most often associated with attractive young female singers, with some, such as France Gall and Gillian Hills, still in their mid-to-late teens. It is thought that the name mostly stems from the repeated backing vocal calls of "yeah! yeah!" that often appeared in yé-yé songs.

Musically, the style took cues from Rock & Roll (together with a particular fixation on the 'Twist' dance) and the emerging Beat Music from the UK, adding orchestration, "cutesy" twee vocals, light, bubbly melodies and a slight Jazz influence. Chanson songwriter and musician Serge Gainsbourg was well-known for writing and arranging many yé-yé records, most notably much of the repertoire of Gall and Brigitte Bardot (the former's "Poupée de cire, poupée de son" winning the 1965 Eurovision Song Contest). Aside from the music, the genre was also widely publicized for its image, which influenced fashion trends in music and everyday life thereafter, including false eyelashes, lipstick aplenty and babydoll dresses, promoting a sense of sexualised naivety. Lyrical matter often didn't reflect the sweet, innocent sound of the music, featuring subtle sexual references sometimes supposedly unknown to the female artist singing the words.

Other 1960s yé-yé stars include Sylvie Vartan, Karina, Rita Pavone, Jacqueline Taïeb and the early work of Françoise Hardy, as well as male singers Johnny Hallyday and Claude François. It was also an underlying influence on the general pop music climate in the mid-1960s, including singers Sandie Shaw, Marianne Faithfull and Petula Clark.

Yé-yé had mostly died out by the end of the 1960s, though experienced mini-revivals in the ensuing decades. It shared similarities with Jovem Guarda, a Brazilian musical movement also inspired by rock & roll and beat music and featuring organ and string arrangements. Yé-yé's simple, happy, catchy melodies provided a general blueprint for mid-to-late 1960s Bubblegum and Sunshine Pop and it was also one of the ingredients for the potpourri of sounds in Shibuya-kei, a late 1980s/1990s genre of Japanese pop music.

Top album



France Gall - Baby Pop (1966)

Guess who made the video or her Eurovision hit below? Yes, @DcsabaS ! :yeah:


You can see in the video how Gainsbourg is much more shy than France (he was very proud of his hit there!)
 

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Discussion Starter #116
J-Pop

J-Pop (aka Poppusu) is a wide-encompassing genre of Pop music in Japan. Whilst originally evolving from Kayōkyoku, J-Pop has since adopted a much broader, slicker, westernized style of music, distancing itself from the more traditional styles of pop music in Japan. Today it is often made with an Electropop, Dance-Pop or Synthpop production, although crossovers with Pop Rock and sometimes Visual kei aren't too uncommon (Southern All Stars, B'z, Gackt).

The idol business is an important factor on the J-pop scene, formed largely of solo stars, Boy Bands (Arashi) or girl groups (Morning Musume) for marketing purposes. Most Japanese idols work on the national music industry. Some people separate idol songs from the rest of the J-pop genre, but still conform to being called by this term. Still, there can be artists who deviate from the idol business by writing and/or producing their own music, such as Hikaru Utada and Ayumi Hamasaki.

Some J-pop songs can be marketed as opening, ending or insert songs for anime or Japanese dramas, which are easier to market to international audiences than the standalone music business.

Top albums




  1. KOTO - Platonic Planet (2015)
  2. Hokago Tea Time - II: Ho-kago Tea Time Second (2010)
  3. Laugh & Peace - Vib-Ribbon (1999)
Shibuya-kei

Shibuya-kei is an eclectic Pop scene from Japan, originating in the late 1980s and popularised through the early 1990s. The name, translating literally as "Shibuya-style", specifically refers to the Shibuya shopping district of Tokyo, an area which at the time was considered the epicentre of fashion with its throwbacks to Western retro and kitsch culture, particularly of the 1960s. Also central to the Shibuya district and its culture were its record stores, stocked with import records from Europe and the United States, whose musical styles would form the basis for a Shibuya-kei movement which reflected the fashion styles popular in the district.

The early pioneers of what would come to be known as Shibuya-kei were Pizzicato Five, drawing heavily from Lounge and Bossa nova, and Flipper's Guitar, whose sound was initially based off that of "neo-acoustic" groups, a Japanese term for a blend between Indie Pop and Jangle Pop. As newer artists like Takako Minekawa, Fishmans, and Kahimi Karie became part of the scene in the following years, influences as broad ranging as Yé-yé, Psychedelic Pop, Exotica, Jazz, Dub, Funk, and Disco were thrown into this melting pot of retro styles. Other artists like Fantastic Plastic Machine and Towa Tei brought in the influence of electronic styles like House and Downtempo. By the mid-1990s, this wide-ranging melting pot would include styles as disparate as the experimental, dancy rock of Buffalo Daughter, the arty dub-influenced Hi-Posi, and Cornelius of Flipper’s Guitar, founder of the influential Trattoria label, who brought in elements of Psychedelic Rock, Shoegaze, Indietronica, and Neo-Psychedelia on his later solo releases. As the 1990s went on, Pizzicato Five and Cornelius would gain international notoriety on the Matador label, influencing the contemporaneous and similarly retro Chamber Pop style in Europe and North America.

The Shibuya-kei scene would be declared "dead" in 1998 by British musician Momus, who had worked with several of its prominent artists, after the release of Cornelius’s genre-bending Fantasma album and the slow dissolution of Pizzicato Five. However, even in the late 1990s, the sound of Shibuya-kei was pushed forward by groups like Spank Happy, Qypthone, and Paris Match. Another wave of younger musicians who had grown up with the first wave emerged in the early 2000s and were marketed as "neo-Shibuya-kei" by labels and the press, with Capsule the most prominent and commercially successful of these artists. Their producer, Yasutaka Nakata, would lead the way in blending Shibuya-kei’s retro elements with J-Pop, in Capsule as well as the early music of idol group Perfume. Other post-millennium artists like Plus-Tech Squeeze Box and Sonic Coaster Pop sped up the sound and brought in elements of Chiptune to create a substyle sometimes known as Picopop. Though even this neo-Shibuya-kei movement has faded with the end of the 2000s, the Shibuya-kei movement’s investment in and repurposing of retro Western pop styles still influences mainstream Japanese pop and underground artists in the country alike.

Top albums




  1. Cornelius - Fantasma (1997)
  2. Lamp - Koibito he (2004)
 

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Discussion Starter #117
What is Progressive Pop?

Progressive pop is a genre known by a few characterizations. One places the genre as a precursor to Progressive Rock. When the two terms appeared in the 1960s, they were roughly interchangeable, referring to a particular style of Pop or Rock music that was more complex and personalized than had been normal for AM radio. Another characterization, most often associated with the 1970s–80s, is thought to bridge the musical elements of progressive rock and pop together. In short, the instrumental virtuosity and expansive structures found in the former are combined with the catchiness, oftentimes simple melodies, and accessibility of the latter, to bring a sound distinct from both.

To properly distinguish this genre, progressive pop is best viewed as a comparatively milder (or "pop") counterpart to progressive rock. Like in prog rock, the term "progressive" refers to the genre's attempts to break with standard music formulas. In the case of progressive pop, this means the standards of pop music prior to the mid to late 1960s, which was often short, simple, and had instrumentation that either involved guitar, bass and drum combos or traditional orchestrated arrangements for vocalists. In contrast, progressive pop usually contains more eclectic (sometimes quasi-symphonic) instrumentation, song times longer than the average 2.5 minutes, unorthodox harmonic structures (for pop), and/or abnormal timbres and textures.

In comparison to Art Pop, which subverts/deconstructs/synthesizes pop music in various ways, progressive pop focuses more on relatively complex, melodic, yet palatable songwriting. Progressive pop should also not be mistaken for "experimental pop" or "avant-pop" styles, as it never overindulges in challenging avant-garde forms.

Progressive pop music was jump-started by the sectors of 1960s Psychedelia which contributed significantly to the emergence of prog rock, beginning with Pop Rock groups who aspired to elevate their music from teen entertainment to artistic statement. The Beach Boys' Pet Sounds was one massively influential example, containing several pop songs that drew from Western Classical Music while experimenting with arrangement, production, form, and tone colors. Progressive pop subsequently lived on for the rest of the decade mostly as an undercurrent within early prog/Art Rock like The Moody Blues' Days of Future Passed, whereas others, like Van Dyke Parks' Song Cycle, embraced full-on progressive pop with little to no rock influences.

By 1970, the notion of "progressive" pop music was seen as somewhat antiquated, and was spiritually succeeded by the prog/art rock movements. Later in the decade, some artists formerly associated with prog rock brought the genre closer to its 1960s pop rock roots. These included Electric Light Orchestra ("Mr. Blue Sky"), Supertramp ("The Logical Song"), and The Alan Parsons Project ("I Wouldn't Want to Be Like You").

Top albums




  1. Lucio Battisti - Anima latina (1974)
  2. Hakushi Hasegawa - エアにに (2019)
  3. Liekki - Korppi (2003)
  4. 3776 - Saijiki (2019)
  5. The Fiery Furnaces - Blueberry Boat (2004)
I enjoy that:


As for Lucio Battisti it sounds very nice but I could only catch this on YT from the album listed:


I seem to recall the full album was there but apparently it was deleted.
 

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Too many subgenres...

It seems like there are disproportionally many Japanese music fans on that forum. Lots of "top albums" contain Japanese albums.
 

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Discussion Starter #119
Too many subgenres...

Alos, it seems like there are disproportionally many Japanese music fans on that forum. Lots of "top albums" contain Japanese albums.
Well, I don't know well Japanese music but 3776 may come with my favorite music this year if I judge by the track above. If the full album is that level it's rather underrated in comparison to western artists topping the charts.
 

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Rate Your Music has it in Coldwave, which is defined as such:

Coldwave is a style of Post-Punk music that originated in Europe in the late 1970s and early 1980s and is known for its generally dark, gloomy (thus "cold") atmosphere and heavy reliance on synthesizers. It was popular predominantly in continental Europe (especially in France, Poland, and Belgium) and consisted largely of bands that were heavily influenced by British post-punk acts such as Joy Division and Siouxsie and The Banshees (and these British acts are sometimes referred to as coldwave in those countries).

Whereas Polish coldwave bands such as Siekiera were more directly influenced by guitar-driven post-punk music, French and Belgian artists such as Clair Obscur and Siglo XX incorporated more synths and electronics and crossed over heavily with Minimal Wave and Minimal Synth. Due to the frequent genre-bending nature of these bands, it can be sometimes difficult to classify bands as strictly coldwave, post-punk, or minimal synth, but all of the artists in the coldwave scene shared a dark, cold, and metallic atmosphere and incorporated both guitars and synths.

:hatoff:
a lot of Polish artists from this genre and new wave, while really good, ripped straight off not from English or French, but from Yugoslavian bands :tape: Shame to say our most famous rock band of the last 30 years, one I liked a lot in their 15 years prime, is entirely built on Haustor :sobbing:

And completely not surprising that their leader organized in the early 2000s projects that covered Yugoton classics in Polish. And they were all *huge* mainstream hits in the next several years in Poland.

Ex-Yu scene is not only Yugoton. There were more underground projects. Their scene was better and more original than Polish. :sad:


I also like some Dutch (it's crazy how ahead of their times they were sometimes) and Belgian projects.

Though French 80s are my favourites. I like also how the prog / jazz French musicians turned into minimal wave (and later even synthpop lol... for example, Magma musicians played on that Barre Phillips' daughters' commercial synthpop record that Laurent Moy once sent on BSG) and still managed to kill at it.

So, here we are French minimal wave is my favourite genre :inlove:

 
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