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What's your favorite kind of music?


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Discussion Starter #81
One of the highest rated album in Classical Music, all genres, is Steve Reich's Music for 18 Musicians released in 1978. The genre is called Minimalism, which is a branch of Modern Classical. Minimalism has connections to electronic and experimental music as well (initiated by Terry Riley back in the late sixties). I'm not necessarily crazy about minimalism but looking for the most immediately striking stuff of the kind, I must say that Gavin Bryars The Sinking of the Titanic from 1975 is a piece of beauty. Here the minimalism is much less radical and actually closer to Classical Music. I must have heard this thing already but can't remember where or when. Maybe in a movie.

 

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Discussion Starter #82
Heard that tune for the first time last week, as my immediate neighbours were playing it loud. I suspected it was a recent chart topper, and yes it is:

wiki:

"Dance Monkey" is a song by Australian singer Tones and I, released on 10 May 2019 as the second single from Tones and I's debut EP The Kids Are Coming. The song was produced and mixed by Konstantin Kersting. Upon release, Tones and I said the song is about the expectations that are placed on musical performers.

It reached number one in Australia, where it has so far stayed for twelve consecutive weeks. Outside Australia, "Dance Monkey" has also topped the charts in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, and peaked within the top ten in many other European and Asian countries. It is the first charting single for Tones and I in the United States, debuting at number 96 and peaking at number 75 on the Billboard Hot 100.
I was trying to sleep when my neighbours were playing it... and I thought: "Typical bitpop but damn catchy". Today I decided to find out and here it is. This is what you hear everywhere.

 

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Discussion Starter #83
^ I feel for all the parents who have children listening to this all day. :lol:

I was surprised, as for me, by the relative quality of the music played in a supermarket in town (including old sixties stuff to my taste). There are probably people whose job is to make playlists for shops. I've heard it's elaborated with marketing goals. In big supermarkets, you have different kinds of musics adapted to every corner to set the customers in the right mood to buy the products.

That consumer world is sometime scary and sad. I have a taste for freedom that consists of getting away from it as much as possible.

You're under the influence of everything, whoever you are. I'm not delusional about it. Wherever you grow up, you're under influences, and it's not bad. You learn to assimilate. What's important is to be aware of it.
 

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I always tell myself to keep an open mind and open heart to everything. We have our tastes but we can choose to be receptive to things that we don't typically take towards. Music for different purposes, people and time.

Speaking of time, it is weird hearing Wagner's Overture to "The Mastersingers of Nuremberg


This version in the clip above was performed during the midst of World War II in Germany. The piece is associated with Nazi propaganda after the fact (and Wagner himself had nationalistic tendencies) but there is some understated brilliance about the piece and the times; quite a stunning video when you look at it and the mood captured by the audience as well (VERY serious).
 

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Heard that tune for the first time last week, as my immediate neighbours were playing it loud. I suspected it was a recent chart topper, and yes it is:



wiki:







I was trying to sleep when my neighbours were playing it... and I thought: "Typical bitpop but damn catchy". Today I decided to find out and here it is. This is what you hear everywhere.



It's a very popular song on TikTok. People are filming short funny videos to the background of this song.
 

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Discussion Starter #86
^ Interesting. I didn't know that app. What I read about it is worrying. I wouldn't be surprised if my neighbours were using it, they're the hysterical kind.
 

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Discussion Starter #87
Pop leads the poll. Here's a list of Pop genres that I separated from other genres they overlap with.

Pop:

Adult Contemporary
Ambient Pop
Art Pop
Baroque Pop
Blue-Eyed Soul
Boy Band
Brill Building
Bubblegum
CCM
Classical Crossover
C-Pop
Dansbandsmusik
Dansktop
Easy Listening
Europop
French Pop
Girl Group
Indie Pop
Italo Pop
Jazz Pop
J-Pop
K-Pop
Nederpop
Palingsound
Progressive Pop
Schlager
Shibuya-kei
Sophisti-Pop
Soviet Estrada
Sunshine Pop
Teen Pop
Traditional Pop
Turkish Pop
V-Pop
Yé-yé

w/ Dance:

Dance-Pop

w/ Electronic:

Bitpop
Electropop
Glitch Pop
Synthpop

w/ Folk:

Folk Pop

w/ Psychedelia:

Psychedelic Pop

w/ Regional Music:

Arabic Pop
Balkan Pop-Folk
Cambodian Pop
Country Pop
Dangdut
Flamenco Pop
Indian Pop
Latin Pop
Persian Pop
Pop Ghazal
Pop Raï
Pop Sunda
Rabiz
Rigsar
Rumba catalana
Russian Chanson
Sertanejo universitário

w/ Rock:

New Romantic
Pop Rock

w/ Soul:

Pop Soul

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Of course it's always tricky to classify musics. Rate Your Music, that I use as reference, usually describes albums under several genres, rarely a main one. It is nonetheless interesting to dig further and learn more about the various music genres, scenes and cultures of the world, past or present. It helps a lot to open the mind and... the taste.
 

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Discussion Starter #88
Rate Your Music have charts based on average ratings that you can find for pretty much everything: music genre, year, format, etc...

So I guess a good way to get an idea of every genre listed above is to look for the single that tops it.

For Adult Contemporary, the single that tops the genre is Roxy Music's version of 'Jealous Guy". Ouch! I love the Lennon version so much I was never able to enjoy Bryan Ferry's version. How open-minded is that? :lol:

Which Pop genre would you like to hear? :eek:h:
 

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I always tell myself to keep an open mind and open heart to everything. We have our tastes but we can choose to be receptive to things that we don't typically take towards. Music for different purposes, people and time.

Speaking of time, it is weird hearing Wagner's Overture to "The Mastersingers of Nuremberg


This version in the clip above was performed during the midst of World War II in Germany. The piece is associated with Nazi propaganda after the fact (and Wagner himself had nationalistic tendencies) but there is some understated brilliance about the piece and the times; quite a stunning video when you look at it and the mood captured by the audience as well (VERY serious).
I'm loving this overture although this particular clip is of a poor quality for obvious reasons. It's very dynamic and melodic and the music flows beautifully with full power of the orchestra behind it. It's probably his best intro along with the overtures to Lohengrin and Tannhäuser.

Besides the world-famous 'Here Comes the Bride', my all-time favourite piece by RW is probably the chorus 'Freudig begrüßen wir die edle Halle' from Tannhäuser.


It's actually funny when timeless classical treasures have just a handful of views, while some random 'modern' garbage which will be soon forgotten attracts dozens of millions of viewers :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #90 (Edited)
Still in Adult Contemporary, what tops the albums charts is the album Costello made with Burt Bacharach. I haven't listened to that album in full as it bores me right away. I could rarely like Costello's voice, to boot. I only tolerate his early albums with the Attractions.

A sub-genre of Adult Contemporary is City Pop, which comes from Japan. City Pop is much more favored than Adult Contemporary if I believe the album charts (Top 5 is City Pop). Tatsuro Yamashita's Ride On Time (1980) comes first. I won't say i'm crazy about it, but I find the opening song charming so I could get into this stuff.


What tops the City Pop singles charts on the other hand is "Plastic Love" by Mariya Takeuchi (1985) and I don't like it at all.

The albums charts have three albums of Yamashita, and also an album of Sugar Babe and another of Taeko Ohnuki, all from Japan. Sugar Babe was actually Yamashita and Ohnuki's collaborative effort in 1975 before they parted ways.

A full play of Yamashita's album above leaves the present listener with a product of its time, with a kitsch charm, but more than that, I appreciate the man lives through his music and comes with something human and consistent (some kind of mellowness comes from soul music too). It's comparable to what we call "musique de variété" in France (with a 70s-80s stamp in this case). Comparable to what France Gall did with Michel Berger, for instance.

I wouldn't compare that to Julio Iglesias on the other hand, though Iglesias certainly fits in what we call Adult Contemporary, a genre that is far from my cup of tea overall.

Look for the song at 26:26 on the album above. That's very sweet and totally soulful. It's called "My Sugar Babe" and I suspect it's no coincidence with his past collaboration.
 

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Discussion Starter #91
On Rate Your Music, Wagner tops the Opera LP charts with this 1953 release of Tristan und Isolde:

 

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I'll give the first vote to folk & country.
 

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On a more general note, what's fascinating about music is that it connects people of various backgrounds, professions or ages and popular musicians are often so adored that they are given lavish and pompous state funerals.

Just a few weeks ago, we had this situation in Prague, as the country's most popular singer dubbed 'Sinatra of the East' had died and his fans put more than 30,000 candles in front of the house where he had lived.



The mourning for him and the subsequent funeral was being compared to that of Johnny Hallyday in France, where a million people turned up on the Champs Elysées to accompany the coffin.



People love and are willing to pay tribute to the musicians who have touched their hearts and souls :cheer:
 

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Discussion Starter #95 (Edited)
Let's take a look at what's called Art Pop. A definition from RYM:

Art pop is a loose subcategory of Pop that is characterized for its manipulation of signs and its synthesis of cultural art forms; where artists reflect an affinity with art school practices or other musical/non-musical art sources such as pop art, literature, cinema, traditional music, theater performances, Experimental, Electronic, and so on. This can be musically expressed through the subversion or deconstruction of various styles, for example, by reimagining historical genres in a disparately contemporary setting, or by adopting traditions from 'serious music' (like those from Western Classical Music). In any case, the music remains in a fairly pop context.

While many art pop examples may also be considered 'experimental pop' or 'avant-garde pop', the music does not have to be challenging or inaccessible. In addition to this, relatively complex or atypical structures (for pop) should not be considered an inherent feature of the genre (unlike Progressive Pop). Art pop's main distinction to Art Rock (a related genre which contains overlapping characteristics) is that it does not confine itself to Rock idioms through the extensive use of guitars, electric bass, drum kits, etc.

Early artists who helped to develop the genre, without necessarily always fully embracing it, include Brian Wilson, John Cale, David Bowie and Brian Eno, most of whom integrated inspirations from their art school studies to their music. They were followed in the 1970s by musicians such as Sparks, Todd Rundgren, Slapp Happy, Godley & Creme and Japan, who continued to integrate art school sensibilities prominently in their work. In the 1980s, Kate Bush was influential to a new wave of melodramatic art pop, while in the 1990s, Björk characterized the genre with a heightened emphasis on digital electronics. Recently, art pop artists come increasingly more often from an Indie Pop/Indie Rock background, for instance St. Vincent, alt-J, Julia Holter. There is also a big part of art pop artists with Contemporary R&B sensibilities, for example Janelle Monáe and FKA twigs.

Top albums:




  1. Björk - Homogenic (1997)
  2. Kate Bush - Hounds of Love (1985)
  3. Gorillaz - Demon Days (2005)
  4. Sheena Ringo - Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana (2003)
  5. Stereolab - Emperor Tomato Ketchup (1996)
  6. FKA twigs - Magdalene (2019) [ ---> fairly new, beware of the hype...]
  7. Julia Holter - Have You in My Wilderness (2015)
  8. David Sylvian - Secrets of the Beehive (1987)
 

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Those labels are useful only superficially. Because for me, I can easily adore one artist and dislike another artist belonging to the same "group". For example, I hate FKA Twigs but love Stereolab, Julia Holter, Kate Bush... and am indifferent towards David Sylvian, Sheena Ringo and Bjork's Homogenic.
 

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What I wanted to say, those albums are really different sounding. I would never group them together myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #98
Those labels are useful only superficially. Because for me, I can easily adore one artist and dislike another artist belonging to the same "group". For example, I hate FKA Twigs but love Stereolab, Julia Holter, Kate Bush... and am indifferent towards David Sylvian, Sheena Ringo and Bjork's Homogenic.
What I wanted to say, those albums are really different sounding. I would never group them together myself.
I learn from these kind of classifications as for me - and it's fine to debate about it. The effort to label musics, such as what RYM does, adds a more global and comprehensive view to mine. Most of the time I find them pertinent or interesting. Sometime I find them disturbing, especially regarding some not well known musics I know well. Still I appreciate the effort (obviously, given this thread :eek:h:).

I struggle to get the appeal of FKA Twigs as well. :tape:

I adore Julia Holter. I don't know the album above but have Loud City Song and it's sublime. :hearts:

I have yet to hear Sheena Ringo.
 

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Discussion Starter #99
A song from the Sheena Ringo* LP listed above:


It's quite enjoyable for me, thanks to the guitars. This track alone sounds more "art rock" than "art pop", so I'm guessing the full album has diverse textures as a whole or if not, a pop sensibility overall for song structures and melodies.

*apparently it's Shiina Ringo or Ringo Sheena.
 
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