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What's your favorite kind of music?


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I listen to many kind of music, still 90% of time it's classical and opera. Otherwise I like some sorts of Jazz, classic rock , hard rock (Led Zeppelin, Guns'n Roses), and some older pop. I am not a fan of country/folk music and I really don't like hip hop.
http://https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=df-eLzao63I
Great! Where in Canada do you follow classical music, do you attend concert & opera events or have a massive CD collection I guess?

On a side note: Peter Freestone, Freddie Mercury's personal secretary and the key consultant for the recent movie hit Bohemian Rhapsody was recently asked why did he live in the Czech Republic.

'I love classical music and here it's everywhere. Every day and every week I can visit a concert. I also like how kids are taught to be proud about the country's musical heritage and composers. Even very little kids know lyrics of the local folk songs by heart. We don't have this in the UK'.

It was pretty interesting to me to learn that someone who had been exposed on a daily basis to the music of Queen and spent 365 days a year around Freddie Mercury was such a classical music lover.
 

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Discussion Starter #62 (Edited)
^ You may appreciate the Phantom Thread soundtrack by Jonny Greenwood (guitarist and arranger of Radiohead).

This musician's tastes cross all the borders of music, from hip hop to classical, jazz to electronic. He composed several film scores. Greenwood enjoys modern classical and mentions Messiaen and Penderecki. :)
 

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^This x10000000000.

Buy on iTunes, at your local record shop, Barnes & Noble, Wal-Mart, Target, or stream on Spotify, Apple Music, Youtube, Amazon, Tidal, Deezer, or mySpace. Thank yiew.
 

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Mostly Rock, Metal, and some Electronic music. I'm currently in a 90's Latin rock-jazz phase and it's great.

I respect all kinds of music, except bachata and reggaeton.
 

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Discussion Starter #67


Lana Del Rey's new album was released on August 30 and is already 2019 Top 4 album on Rate Your Music. Great for her, but let's give it time. :eek:h:

Apparently she made a "singer/songwriter" album this time around?

I have two albums of her, Born To Die and Ultraviolence, like them moderately. I'm giving a spin to this new album and don't seem to hear many changes of style. Are the lyrics making it especially worthwhile?
 

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Discussion Starter #69
Once you're at "The Next Best American Record" you're exasperated, though. She really should try variety, because that album sounds like the same song from start to finish. Oh, but it follows with "The Greatest" which is a very good song (no related to Cat Power). So, she should have skimmed a bit more.

In parts it's a piano-ballad album that reminds a bit of Fiona Apple.
 

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Discussion Starter #71
So, after a full listen, I'll say Lana Del Rey offered a "singer/songwriter" album, yes, digging her own style in a radical way, like some artists do sometime in their life. Think Springsteen with Nebraska or Nick Cave with The Boatman's Call. You have to enter Lana's intimate world. Her mood isn't necessarily easy to approach, it's melancholy, languor, it can sound monotonous... but if you respect the artist you have to give it several listens (well, unless it doesn't fit your taste or really exasperates you :eek:h:). Personally, I can give it another listen sometime, I already have a lot of albums of that kind in my CD collection (Emily Haines, for instance, and many others).

Maybe she should have tried to reduce the batch of songs to ten at best? The last one, "Hope is a dangerous thing for a woman like me to have - but I have it" was good too.
 

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Discussion Starter #72
Mostly Rock, Metal, and some Electronic music. I'm currently in a 90's Latin rock-jazz phase and it's great.

I respect all kinds of music, except bachata and reggaeton.
What kind of Metal, for instance? :eek:h:

Can't help but laugh at the list of sub-genres below :laugh2:

1. Alternative Metal
2. Funk Metal
3. Nu Metal
4. Rap Metal
5. Avant-Garde Metal
6. Black Metal
7. Atmospheric Black Metal
8. Blackgaze
9. Black 'n' Roll
10. Depressive Black Metal
11. Melodic Black Metal
12. Pagan Black Metal
13. Symphonic Black Metal
14. War Metal
15. Death Metal
16. Brutal Death Metal
17. Slam Death Metal
18. Death 'n' Roll
19. Melodic Death Metal
20. Technical Death Metal
21. Doom Metal
22. Death Doom Metal
23. Funeral Doom Metal
24. Traditional Doom Metal
25. Drone Metal
26. Folk Metal
27. Celtic Metal
28. Medieval Folk Metal
29. Gothic Metal
30. Grindcore
31. Cybergrind
32. Deathgrind
33. Goregrind
34. Groove Metal
35. Heavy Metal
36. NWOBHM
37. Industrial Metal
38. Cyber Metal
39. Neue Deutsche Härte
40. Melodic Metalcore
41. Nintendocore
42. Trancecore
43. Metalcore
44. Deathcore
45. Mathcore
46. Neoclassical Metal
47. Post-Metal
48. Power Metal
49. Progressive Metal
50. Djent
51. Sludge Metal
52. Atmospheric Sludge Metal
53. Speed Metal
54. Stoner Metal
55. Symphonic Metal
56. Thrash Metal
57. Crossover Thrash
58. Technical Thrash Metal
59. Trance Metal
60. Viking Metal

Seriously, though, there is some stuff from these genres I quite like. Atmospheric Black Metal is really something. One has to listen to Burzum!

 

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So, after a full listen, I'll say Lana Del Rey offered a "singer/songwriter" album, yes, digging her own style in a radical way, like some artists do sometime in their life. Think Springsteen with Nebraska or Nick Cave with The Boatman's Call. You have to enter Lana's intimate world. Her mood isn't necessarily easy to approach, it's melancholy, languor, it can sound monotonous... but if you respect the artist you have to give it several listens (well, unless it doesn't fit your taste or really exasperates you :eek:h:). Personally, I can give it another listen sometime, I already have a lot of albums of that kind in my CD collection (Emily Haines, for instance, and many others).

Maybe she should have tried to reduce the batch of songs to ten at best? The last one, "Hope is a dangerous thing for a woman like me to have - but I have it" was good too.
lol love the review. Yeah it all sounds similar but that just what she's been doing whole career. Though this one feels so much like a chill summer trip back in time. For me, the melancholy is soothing, I hit play while working and don't even notice time passing by. Also, that Sublime's Doin' Time cover is great and such a good fitting for the album.
 

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Discussion Starter #74
For your own pleasure: my favourite version of "Summertime"


I spent last year's summer listening to singles from the 20's, 30's, 40's... thanks to YouTube.
 

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Lana Del Rey's new album was released on August 30 and is already 2019 Top 4 album on Rate Your Music. Great for her, but let's give it time. <img src="http://www.tennisforum.com/images/smilies/oh.gif" border="0" alt="" title="oh" class="inlineimg" />

Apparently she made a "singer/songwriter" album this time around?

I have two albums of her, Born To Die and Ultraviolence, like them moderately. I'm giving a spin to this new album and don't seem to hear many changes of style. Are the lyrics making it especially worthwhile?
I’d recommend Lust for Life. It’s more mainstream but it’s a little different from her usual “sound” and it’s her trying and experimenting with a different sound. It doesn’t always work out well IMO but I stan her so don’t tell anyone I said that.

Also Ultraviolence is just a freaking amazing album. As is Honeymoon, Lust for Life, Norman Fucking Rockwell, Paradise, and Born to Die...although Born to Die definitely has a few “filler” tracks on it and some of the songs feel overproduced. Just the ones I can think of: “Diet Mountain Dew” is not filler but it was wayyyy overproduced there’s a demo of it out there on YouTube that is so much better. Then there’s 2 or 3 tracks that feel like filler. For me though I can cut the girl some slack it’s her first album though and considering that it’s still one hell of a debut IMO. (I used to actually NOT like Lana but then I forced myself to listen to Ultraviolence and I was like omg I love this.)
 

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Hate to admit, but I'm obsessed with Norman FUCKINg Rockwell. Most enjoyable album experience in years!

Yes, the style is good old reliable Lana. But it all feels more mature and clever overall. Yes the lyrics are more interesting than before. For example, I couldn't finish her 2015 album Honeymoon and Ultraviolence from 2014 had many duds too. 2017's Lust For Life wasn't good overall, too hit or miss, with too rare flashes of brilliance. The production on the new record has less elements of the modern mainstream trends, therefore the album stands out among other contemporary releases. Her vocals turn out great, despite (or because of?) of her vocal limitations. It's her strongest work by far. Everything falls into place, which I appreciate although I don't normally appreciate the album oriented projects.
 

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Discussion Starter #78 (Edited)
A definition of Pop from Rate Your Music:

Pop music, more than any other genre, is closely tied to the economic forces of mass production and mass marketing. The first popular standards were a result of the new market for sheet music in the 19th century. For the first time, songwriters could earn a living from consumers without a traveling show or a supportive patron. The invention of the phonographic cylinder at the tail end of the 19th century, and the more lasting disc technology developed at the beginning of the 20th century took the standardization of songs and potential for mass consumption a step further.

Non-Classical Music in the first half of the 20th century was broadly referred to as "popular" music, not "pop" music. Nonetheless, the popular music from the 1900s to the 1940s that appealed to the most mainstream tastes in America, is generally recognized now as Traditional Pop.

The dynamic post-World War II economy and the advent of the Rock & Roll era brought about a new age of teen consumerism and the first wave of Teen Pop celebrities. Various sources suggest the use of the word "pop" dating back well before the 1950s, but it was certainly the '50s when it took hold as a cultural phenomenon.

Because "pop" can simply mean what is or was popular in many different times and places, defining it more narrowly as an actual musical genre is arguably ill-advised. Nonetheless, most pop music does share many distinct traits. Pop music is generally designed to be catchy, with a beat or a melody or a lyric or a hook (or all four) that are readily accessible, particularly to young people. It is also produced, often by large and expert teams, in way that removes any rough edges.

Pop music, more so than Rock music, also tends to emphasize the vocalist as the lead performer. As such, pop songs tend to be somewhat short with only brief instrumental breaks. A basic intro/verse/chorus/verse/chorus structure, or some mild variation on that structure, is very common in pop music and has remained common over the decades.

In the 1960s, The Beatles brought Pop Rock to the fore, and in doing so challenged some notions of what rough edges might be allowed within the basic construct of pop. In the 1970s, many Soft Rock artists went the other direction and softened pop reducing the centrality of the beat in pop music. By the end of the decade, however, Disco had taken pop in an even more dance oriented direction paving the way for Dance-Pop.

Pop and R&B have always coexisted with a great deal of direct crossover and indirect crosspollination. In the 1980s those lines were blurred even more as Michael Jackson was crowned the king of pop. In the 21st century, Hip Hop has become a major influence in pop music with many pop stars employing the top hip hop producers to assist in making their hits.

Pop music has also become globalized to a tremendous extent (e.g., C-Pop, K-Pop, Indian Pop, and Latin Pop) reflecting both a global economy and a growing consumer class in most of the world.

Top albums of broad, global Pop category:




  1. Michael Jackson - Thriller (1982)
  2. Roy Orbison - In Dreams (1963)
  3. ABBA - Super Trouper (1980)
  4. George Michael - Listen Without Prejudice Vol. 1 (1990)
 

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Discussion Starter #79
An interesting definition of Classical Music (RYM):

Classical Music is part of a broad generalization about the structure and function of music throughout history and across the globe, describing traditional genres of music distinct from Traditional Folk Music and Popular Music developed in the 20th century. Genres are typically classified as Classical in recognition of their own culture considering them a form of art separate from and more "sophisticated" than its Traditional Folk. Classical Musics tend to exist in relatively unified form on territories much larger than Traditional Folk genres do, thus overlapping several separate Traditional Folk areas. They usually begin as a "refined" version of Traditional Folk created for ceremonial use and often continue to take inspiration from and have influence on Traditional Folk later in their history.

However, there exists a couple of common features that can be used to indicate how and when a genre ceases to be Traditional Folk and develops as something "Classical". These two seem to be intertwined: It could be said that Classical forms of music are preferred by priests/royalty/scholars due to their perceived higher complexity and refinement. But at the same time it is this preference and patronage that enables the musicians to train full time, giving them opportunities to improve their skills and develop the music. That full-time training sets Classical music apart from Folk in terms of performance - contrary to Folk genres, almost every Classical genre around the world has a rather rigid norm of a "correct" performance and "correct" compositional structure. Although Classical music in its model form originates from professional musicians, its appreciation and amateur performance can be and often is widespread in the society.

Given that the concept of Classical music seems to be absent in non-hierarchical societies, it could be assumed that the support of some kind of an elite (economic, social, scholarly, religious) is necessary for the development of Classical music. Also, the distinction between Classical Music and Folk music can be viewed as reflecting the hierarchy in a society. This kind of music is known under dozens of different names across the globe; they often suggest some kind of superiority (e.g. Polish muzyka poważna = "serious music", Korean 정악 = "proper music", common "art music") reflecting its status privileged by customary cultural biases.
 

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Discussion Starter #80
The various paths of Classical Music:

Arabic Classical Music
Brazilian Classical Music
East Asian Classical Music
Latin Classical Music
Modern Classical
Persian Classical Music
Pibroch
Shashmaqam
South Asian Classical Music
Southeast Asian Classical Music
Turkish Classical Music
Western Classical Music

Modern Classical and Western Classical are, from a western perspective/overview to the least, the only gates that you won't find in Regional Music as well. I guess it means the history of Western Classical and Modern Classical has gone culturally beyond regional tradition?

When I listen to classical romanticism today, I get bored fast, I must admit. If I look for some kind of beauty in the field of Chamber Music for instance, I'll rather get into Alfred Schnittke's work for string quartets.

 
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