Tennis Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Veelieve!!!
Joined
·
32,523 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
By Jon Bramley

LONDON, April 29 (Reuters) - Wimbledon's tradition of players bowing and curtseying to the royal box on centre court will largely stop from this year, tournament chairman Tim Phillips said on Tuesday.

Players will be excused from making the gesture to members of the Royal Family and visiting dignitaries, apart from the Queen and Prince Charles.

The Queen has not attended the tournament since her Silver Jubilee year of 1977 when she presented the women's singles trophy to Briton Virginia Wade.

The move follows a request from All England Club President, the Duke of Kent, to cease the tradition in line with common practice elsewhere.

"We have had an ongoing dialogue over a number of years with the Duke and his preference is to stop doing it," said Phillips.

"Players are always very agreeable and they have no problem with it. But the Duke of Kent feels that during his lifetime and that of most of the Royal Family the tradition of bowing and curtseying is pretty much on the way out.

"To do it very publicly on the Centre Court at Wimbledon doesn't seem right therefore."

The tournament organiser also announced a 9.5 percent increase in singles prize money and said they planned to limit the number of people queuing overnight for the middle Saturday of the two-week grand slam event.

Phillips said that the queue of people camping out had grown to 9,000 -- an increase of 6,000 on other days -- and needed to be reduced for safety reasons.

"It has reached a critical stage," he said.

Instead there will only be 500 tickets on sale for the centre court on that Saturday instead of the 2,000 available last year. The remaining 1,500 of those centre court tickets will be redistributed to the public in a ballot beforehand and to accredited clubs.

Chief Executive of the All England Club, Chris Gorringe, said: "The Wimbledon queue has become a legendary part of the event itself and it is a tradition we dearly wish to retain.

"At the same time, we have a serious responsibility for the safety for all those coming to the championships."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
639 Posts
Thanks for posting this article. I think these two changes are pretty big because they break with tradition. The second seems to have immediate resonance, though. Nine thousand over nighters waiting for 2,000 tickets sounds like a recipe for trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,802 Posts
No more bowing? in a way I'm glad it's gone but I'm so used to seeing it and some of the best moments have come when people forget to bow. for instance, after the ladies' doubles final, Serena had to tell Paola to curtsy. I thought it was nice when both players left the court at the same time. Next, wimby is going to allow other colors than white. :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,073 Posts
I don't guess they have any plans in the near future of stopping the tradition of paying the men more than the women. :rolleyes:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
181,834 Posts
thats the only rule i want changing
i want Sunday play (but the people who live around the club don't want it :mad: )
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,310 Posts
jmp said:
Thanks for posting this article. I think these two changes are pretty big because they break with tradition. The second seems to have immediate resonance, though. Nine thousand over nighters waiting for 2,000 tickets sounds like a recipe for trouble.
There are also tix available for Court 1, Court 2 and grounds passes to those who queue overnight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,802 Posts
agreed, the Sunday rest day is pretty pointless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,731 Posts
Sunday rest day is crap, but playing all the R16 matches on the Sunday of Rolland Garros pisses me off too!!!

Glad the bowing is gone though, I mean it could cause a knee injury, and also not all the players are British.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,901 Posts
Really anoyed the mens prize money is increased more than the womens.It should be getting closer!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,408 Posts
I've always liked the bowing and curtseying.. Was a very British thing ;)

But yes, agreed about how the prize money should be equal.. At this rate, it'll only be another century or so before that happens :fiery: :mad:
 

·
psychotic banana
Joined
·
3,022 Posts
These writers love play-on words.

Back to the topic at hand, this change does nothing to me, so "eh". *somewhere deep in mind a concession to missing the bows/curtsies is taking place*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,233 Posts
I liked the bowing, it's TRADITION, which is why the players love Wimbledon so much. It's all about tradition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
Wimbledon abandons the Royal Box curtsey

http://www.dailytelegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2003/04/30/nbow30.xml&sSheet=/news/2003/04/30/ixhome.html


Wimbledon abandons the Royal Box curtsey

By John Parsons and Caroline Davies
(Filed: 30/04/2003)

The long-standing tradition of Wimbledon's Centre Court players bowing or curtseying to the Royal Box has been scrapped. The order, which comes into immediate effect, was issued yesterday by the Duke of Kent, President of the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club since 1969, who has deemed it an anachronism in modern times. The only exception would be if the Queen or the Prince of Wales attended, which is about as likely as a British player winning a Wimbledon singles championship. The Queen has visited on around four occasions, the last 26 years ago when Virginia Wade lifted the women's singles during the Silver Jubilee year. Prince Charles has inherited his mother's lack of interest in the sport. Announcing the change, Tim Phillips, chairman of the All England Club, said of the Duke: "He feels the tradition of bowing and curtseying is pretty much on the way out, and he thinks it is time to stop it. We respect his views on that."

Wimbledon's association with royalty dates back to 1906, when King George V, then Prince of Wales, attended the final day's programme accompanied by Princess Mary at the old Worple Road ground. The couple became regular spectators. But the tradition of bowing or curtseying to the Royal Box was first documented on June 26, 1922, when King George and Queen Mary attended the opening day of the championship on its present site in Church Road. When Leslie Godfree and Algie Kingscote walked on to the Centre Court to play the opening match in the new arena, they instinctively turned and bowed to the Royal Box, thus establishing a tradition that has existed ever since - although it has always been on a voluntary basis. "One of the most difficult things I ever had to learn was that little bob," Martina Navratilova, who won the ladies singles a record nine times, once said. Indeed, in the heat of the moment, many top players simply forgot.

Miss Navratilova found the protocol very baffling during her early Wimbledon career, and, after being presented with a runner-up medal by the Duke of Kent, confided: "I forgot to curtsey. I'd never been through something like that before. Usually at tournaments they give you a cheque, you thank everybody and leave." Jennifer Capriati was in such a hurry to leave court when she was beaten in the 2001 final by Justine Henin that she fled without so much as a glance at the Royal Box. Crown Princess Stephanie of Austria is credited with being the first royal visitor to the championships in 1896. But by 1906 Wimbledon was a firm royal favourite. Along with the Prince and Princess of Wales, later King George V and Queen Mary, the Grand Duchess Anastasie and Grand Duke Michael of Russia came to watch. The organisers were delighted when the Prince of Wales accepted the club's presidency in 1907.

Queen Mary became a regular fixture, occupying the front row of the box and slowly retreating, row by row, during the afternoon to prevent the setting sun from shining in her eyes, thus forcing those behind gradually to renounce their seats. Protocol still prevents anybody sitting in front of the royals in the box. In 1926 the then Prince of Wales, later King George VI, competed in the men's doubles, partnered by Sir Louis Greig. They were knocked out in the first round. The late Diana, Princess of Wales was a regular spectator, as is Princess Michael of Kent and the Duchess of York.

© Copyright of Telegraph Group Limited 2003.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,730 Posts
i just heard this on CNN. this was way too long in coming.

then again maybe the folks at Wimby started wising up to the fact that a lot of the players don't actually curtsey. if you look really closely, few of the Americans (outside of the Android) actually do it properly.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top