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Discussion Starter #1
:confused: :scratch: :shrug:











:p











:rolleyes:









:haha:
 

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I think unmarried daughters in Russia have an 'a' at the end of their fathers surname, thats why its Marat Safin and his sister Dinara Safina....i think?
 

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medvedev and medvedeva
 

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Why is Maria's dad Sharapov but her last name is Sharapova
The ending of Russian surname is different for women and men - an 'A' is added for the women's surname.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
:lol:
 

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CJW1984 said:
I think unmarried daughters in Russia have an 'a' at the end of their fathers surname
:) It has nothing to do with marriage status, it's just the way many Russian women (and girls) last names are.
If a married woman changes her last name, it could again end with 'a' depending not on her status, but on grammar rules.
Say, future wife of Marat Safin could take his last name and become Safina.
(btw, Safin is not really a Russian surname, but it doesn't matter in this case).
 

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Slightly off topic, does "sky" = "skaya"?
 

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Dementiev ~ Vera Dementieva ~ Elena Dementieva

(what is LenaD's dad first name??? :confused: )
 

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that`s cool! I noticed that too before... but I read in an article yesterday where the journalist wrote wrong the surname of yuri... he put SHARAPOVA instead of SHARAPOV ;)
 

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The question should be not about Maria here. I was wondering why Tatiana Golovin doesn't have "a" in the end (GolovinA) ;) ;)
 

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Vass22 said:
The question should be not about Maria here. I was wondering why Tatiana Golovin doesn't have "a" in the end (GolovinA) ;) ;)
Tatiana moved to France when she was 8 month old,
and her whole family lives according to French rules,
so she is Golovin as her father is.
I think, her mom is Golovina anyhow, she was grown-up when moving :)
 

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All Russian girls add a "a" at the name of last name

Male_________Female
Dementiev - Dementieva
Krasnoroutsky - Krasnoroutskaya
Sharapov - Sharapova​
Golovzin - Golovzina​


The only name that doesnt change in Russia are names that end in "-enko" .. thats because "-enko" isnt etimolicly Russian .. "-enko" is a Ukrainian form of last names (Vakulenko,Bondarenko,and even Kirilenko(Im guessing a member of her family has Ukrainian descent))
 

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PointBlank said:
All Russian girls add a "a" at the name of last name
...
The only name that doesnt change in Russia are names that end in "-enko" .. thats because "-enko" isnt etimolicly Russian .. "-enko" is a Ukrainian form of last names (Vakulenko,Bondarenko,and even Kirilenko(Im guessing a member of her family has Ukrainian descent))
hmm, how about Natalya Mishkutyonok, Natalya Linichuk? You may add a plenty last names like Shavlo, Sitchkar' etc. There is no strict rule.
 

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PointBlank said:
All Russian girls add a "a" at the name of last name

Male_________Female
Dementiev - Dementieva
Krasnoroutsky - Krasnoroutskaya
Sharapov - Sharapova​
Golovzin - Golovzina​


The only name that doesnt change in Russia are names that end in "-enko" .. thats because "-enko" isnt etimolicly Russian .. "-enko" is a Ukrainian form of last names (Vakulenko,Bondarenko,and even Kirilenko(Im guessing a member of her family has Ukrainian descent))
Is it your empirical rule? :lol:
Reality is somewhat different.
'a' ending is common but not totally.
(btw, '-aya' is not fully the same as it corresponds to '-iy' or '-oy' mostly).
'-enko' is a particular case of '-o' (Louchko, Koutalo...).
We have many forms not changing for gender, e.g.
Monomakh, Malezhik, Shevchuk, Kluny, Khmara, Malevich, Chernykh...
Yes, some of them are like Ukranian/Byelorussian, but it's a different (and difficult)
question of separating three (at least) east-slavonic languages...
I'm not a philologist, and it's not simple to recall at once,
but I'm sure many more surnames (and their patterns) may be found out in dictionaries...
 

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The endings of Russian surnames variate in dependance of Russian grammar's requirements.

The masculine endings -ov, -ev, -in mean belonging to someone.

For example Petrov means Peter's, Ivanov means Ivan's and Nikitin means Nikita's. There are plenty of English names constructed by the same principle (letting out the apostrophe). This is a form of genitive case.

And since Russian genitive differs between masculine und feminine, an "-a" must be added, if it's a woman.
So you have Petrova, Ivanova or Nikitina. This has nothing to do with state of marriage or so.

The ending -sky is comparable with the ending -ian. For example Moskovsky means Moscovian. Here, Russians also differ between M and F. The female ending is -skaya und the word would sound Moskovskaya. The wife of Dostoevsky was called Dostoevskaya and so on.

The starter of this thread Serena Nowitski also seams to have a Russian or Polish name which stopped to be conjugated. If you came to Russia again people would say Nowitskaya.
 

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t_fan said:
hmm, how about Natalya Mishkutyonok, Natalya Linichuk? You may add a plenty last names like Shavlo, Sitchkar' etc. There is no strict rule.
Russians that have names that end in k and o are most likely Ukrainian in origin and don't get conjugated. I don't know about Sitchkar. How/if the name gets conjugated depends on the form/origin of the name as well as the culture the person lives in.
 
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