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When did you start liking Barty?

  • From a junior.

    Votes: 27 21.6%
  • Fed Cup.

    Votes: 4 3.2%
  • Miami titles.

    Votes: 20 16.0%
  • First Slam at FO.

    Votes: 9 7.2%
  • Wimbledon Win.

    Votes: 5 4.0%
  • I have never liked Barty.

    Votes: 26 20.8%
  • I'm indifferent and waiting.

    Votes: 33 26.4%
  • I don't follow tennis.

    Votes: 6 4.8%
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when she retires
 

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I was most of the time indifferent to her and I admit I disliked her for a short period after she beat Kerber in Wimbledon but I like and appreciate the fact that she is one of the few true dominant #1 we had the last decade and I also like her calm but straightforward personality.

Honestly, younger players like Osaka or Andreescu would be better as #1 to promote the WTA but as second choice Barty does a great job too and wouldn´t mind if she keeps this up.
Well....Bianca and Naomi gotta be "in to win it"......so ya know .....there's THAT. How do "promote" players who are basically sitting out half the season?:unsure: 'dems the facts....hope it changes.
 

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Never had a problem with her at all, but I've grown to like her more in the last number of months than I did before. I guess when I know my own favorite player (Iga) can struggle with maintaining her poise when things aren't smooth sailing, it's very easy to appreciate Barty's calm and collective demeanor during a match when she's facing adversity. Ash gave her a good lesson in that when the two played their thus far lone match against one another earlier this year in Madrid. I remember Iga had her down early in the first set, but Ash kept her cool, came back and won the set. Then in the second set, I don't remember exactly what the game score was, but Iga had Barty in a 0-40 hole, but Barty didn't panic, came back to get the hold and it was basically smooth sailing for her in the second set from that point forward. Then when I watch other matches of hers where she doesn't play Iga, it's also really easy to like how easy she makes it look at times with the strong serve and excellent ball placement in corners and on lines on ground strokes. Granted she does have drops on her play, but like I said, I never get this sense of panic with her that I get with Iga and other players when they have a drop in their level of play.

I get that she won't be everyone's cup of tea since she may not play the most exciting brand of tennis on the tour nor does she have this big, outgoing personality that'll draw a ton of casual fans her way. Like Chris Evert said, she lacks this "arrogance" a player supposedly needs to be great. Nobody's let Ash in on the secret though since she's getting better results than anyone on the tour this year. But if anything, her lack of arrogance makes me like her and so does the way she can make the game look very easy even if it's not always the most exciting to most people. Being in the U.S. and following all the major sports there for most of my life save for hockey, I get my share of arrogant professional athletes with that. Given this, I like it when there isn't this great arrogance with a great player, which makes me like Barty and have her in my top 5 favorite WTA players.
 

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There’s really no valid reason to dislike Barty. She’s very professional on and off the court, never gets angry, smashes rackets or throws hissy fits, she conducts herself well in interviews despite being somewhat of an introvert, mega talented with a tons of weapons to hurt opponents, she doesn’t grunt/scream and she just seems like a nice, down to earth girl who you would like as a mate.
but I am very glad the sport had someone like her at the top and I’m happy for her to have all the success she is having as I feel she truly deserves it.
All of this describes Barty well, and why I'd put her on my top 5 list of favorite players along with Iga and Rybakina (with the other two up for debate). Guess I'm a bit more into the introverted types (Ash and Rybakina) than most, but being very introverted myself, I guess it makes it easy for me to relate to that.
 

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But it's also funny to see a few posters talking about her looks. The first tennis player I liked for that reason alone was Ana Ivanovic 😁
 

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Amazingly those people (diehard wta fans) are the overwhelming minority and most tv viewers are not interested in watching Barty unless they are casual aussies watching tennis
pff people who genuinely appreciate good tennis love Barty and turn out in spades around the world to watch her. it's the diehard fanboys on this forum who live vicariously through their favourites on IG who find her boring.
 

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I wasn't really aware of her in her first career. When she came back, I think I first watched her play properly in the 2017 grass season, and I liked what I saw. She seemed very suited to grass, and I thought she would be like Riske/Vekic who play particularly well on the surface. Got a nice player to watch every grass season :p I was a bit disappointed when she then lost R1 in Wimbledon to Svitolina, but anyway.

She had some really solid results in the US hardcourt swing, especially since she had to qualify for them, and that kept her on the radar for me. However, the first time I really took notice and fell in love with her game was her run to the final in Wuhan. The way she dismantled the games of her top opponents round after round was so impressive. I was gutted when she lost the final, but that run made me delve more into her past and find out her background, and I've been loving following her since! :)
In hindsight, her 2017 season is really underrated. She finished 2016 outside the top 300 and she finished 2017 inside the top 20. If it weren't for the fact that she'd failed to break through in her earlier singles career, the idea of a 20/21 year old vaulting from ~#320 to #17 in under 12 months would have been a much bigger story.

By my count, the only players finishing inside the top 20 with a bigger year-on-year jump since 2000 are:
  • Henin from 2009 to 2010 (unranked to #12)
  • Clijsters from 2008 to 2009 (unranked to #18)
  • Hingis from 2005 to 2006 (unranked to #7)
Those were previously #1 ranked players. In contrast, Barty showed something she hadn't shown before.
 

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so many people mentioning slice in this thread..decent number of top players can deal with Barty's slice..I actually think forehand (alongside serve) is her most important weapon..it's very accurate and she does a great job in hitting angled forehands that drag players out wide.
The shots do two different things on purpose. The slice backhand controls the tempo, while her rallying forehand controls court positioning. When her backhand is slicing well, it's extremely hard to hit a powerful shot off of it, and with Barty's footwork and footspeed, she can then move to the forehand side to start dictating the points.

The goal is almost always to finish with either a forehand winner or at the net, but having two different means of workings towards that goal, in different ways, it's harder to get to Barty without redlining your own game.
 

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In hindsight, her 2017 season is really underrated. She finished 2016 outside the top 300 and she finished 2017 inside the top 20. If it weren't for the fact that she'd failed to break through in her earlier singles career, the idea of a 20/21 year old vaulting from ~#320 to #17 in under 12 months would have been a much bigger story.

By my count, the only players finishing inside the top 20 with a bigger year-on-year jump since 2000 are:
  • Henin from 2009 to 2010 (unranked to #12)
  • Clijsters from 2008 to 2009 (unranked to #18)
  • Hingis from 2005 to 2006 (unranked to #7)
Those were previously #1 ranked players. In contrast, Barty showed something she hadn't shown before.
Maybe she flew under the radar because everybody was complaining how bad 2017 was. But I think it was good for her because when she made the next step forwards to the top she was ready for it. If people had hyped her as the next best thing in 2017 it might have been harder to deal with.
 

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Maybe she flew under the radar because everybody was complaining how bad 2017 was. But I think it was good for her because when she made the next step forwards to the top she was ready for it. If people had hyped her as the next best thing in 2017 it might have been harder to deal with.
I just think it's that she wasn't exactly new.

Yes, she was in a completely different mindset and place and energy, but she was half a decade removed from being a junior champion, and she'd already played the main draw of every major prior to that season, so it wasn't the same as (say) Agnes Szavay, who jumped nearly 200 spots in the rankings between 2006 and 2007, but had never played the main draw of a major prior to her 2007 season.

Add into it, the narrative around Barty's comeback was "she left to play cricket" but that's not even close to accurate. To my knowledge, she hasn't come out and said "depression" but people close to her (including her father) have effectively said as much. She didn't do much of anything for the first six months after she left the sport; it wasn't until she was feeling up for it again that she started with the cricket. That's....pretty classic depressive behavior.

It's kind of ironic that there's all this new(-ish) talk about mental health in tennis as a consequence of Osaka's social media attack on the press during clay and grass season. All the while Barty is the player with perhaps the best track record of taking mental health seriously (i.e. it's like an injury, treat it as such) and the best rebound from taking mental health seriously, yet (again, to my knowledge) she has barely been asked about it or mentioned in media coverage of the topic.
 

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I just think it's that she wasn't exactly new.

Yes, she was in a completely different mindset and place and energy, but she was half a decade removed from being a junior champion, and she'd already played the main draw of every major prior to that season, so it wasn't the same as (say) Agnes Szavay, who jumped nearly 200 spots in the rankings between 2006 and 2007, but had never played the main draw of a major prior to her 2007 season.

Add into it, the narrative around Barty's comeback was "she left to play cricket" but that's not even close to accurate. To my knowledge, she hasn't come out and said "depression" but people close to her (including her father) have effectively said as much. She didn't do much of anything for the first six months after she left the sport; it wasn't until she was feeling up for it again that she started with the cricket. That's....pretty classic depressive behavior.

It's kind of ironic that there's all this new(-ish) talk about mental health in tennis as a consequence of Osaka's social media attack on the press during clay and grass season. All the while Barty is the player with perhaps the best track record of taking mental health seriously (i.e. it's like an injury, treat it as such) and the best rebound from taking mental health seriously, yet (again, to my knowledge) she has barely been asked about it or mentioned in media coverage of the topic.
I doubt that she even wants to talk about since it's a privat very difficult situation and Ash isn't the person who will use it as an excuse for anything. That's what I respect in her too :)
 

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I used to dislike Barty, a lot. I thought she was "lame, lack of charisma", you know typical TF arguments. I just found Naomi's power tennis and Vanessa's flashy game and attitude were much more interesting and "better" to represent and sell women tennis to general public.

But then Osaka revealed her true narcistic face, and never in my life I made a 180 degree turn from fan to a hater in a single day 😂 It was truly disappointing and disgusting to see someone that you like, think that she's so much bigger than tennis that originally put her in such privileged place she is right now. That's when I really appreciate Ash and her commitment to the tour. I criticized her a lot when she's not playing in 2020, but then again at least her reasons were very reasonable and when she's back this year, she shows that she's very committed to every tournament she entered, always managed to go far into the latter rounds and she's not playing only due to injuries or travel restriction. Now I'm such a big fan, and I truly think her consistency will save and at least keep women's tennis from being a laughing stock.

Re: Bianca, i've also dropped her from my fan list. The way she treated the tour is so sketchy and disrespectful. Not that I hate her, but I couldnt care less now if she's out of top 100 by the end of this year.
 

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I doubt that she even wants to talk about since it's a privat very difficult situation and Ash isn't the person who will use it as an excuse for anything. That's what I respect in her too :)
Agreed - there are a handful of longer-form interviews she's done since she hit the top 20 that have gotten as close as anything to touching on it, but there's an almost studious avoidance of outright saying anything specific.

However, the way it has been narratively ignored is also part of why the rhetoric around her staying home during the last half of 2020 (notably, the same as Halep and Osaka - neither of them traveled outside their home region) was pretty tone-deaf. She was not only dealing with stricter policies than North American or European-based athletes, but she had literally left the sport for 18 months because of the strain of being separated from her family. She's made it clear that her comeback was, in part, contingent on her ability to come home when she wanted. I was not even sure she'd be traveling at all in 2021 given the restrictions on returning to Australia.
 

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I just think it's that she wasn't exactly new.

Yes, she was in a completely different mindset and place and energy, but she was half a decade removed from being a junior champion, and she'd already played the main draw of every major prior to that season, so it wasn't the same as (say) Agnes Szavay, who jumped nearly 200 spots in the rankings between 2006 and 2007, but had never played the main draw of a major prior to her 2007 season.

Add into it, the narrative around Barty's comeback was "she left to play cricket" but that's not even close to accurate. To my knowledge, she hasn't come out and said "depression" but people close to her (including her father) have effectively said as much. She didn't do much of anything for the first six months after she left the sport; it wasn't until she was feeling up for it again that she started with the cricket. That's....pretty classic depressive behavior.

It's kind of ironic that there's all this new(-ish) talk about mental health in tennis as a consequence of Osaka's social media attack on the press during clay and grass season. All the while Barty is the player with perhaps the best track record of taking mental health seriously (i.e. it's like an injury, treat it as such) and the best rebound from taking mental health seriously, yet (again, to my knowledge) she has barely been asked about it or mentioned in media coverage of the topic.

They do talk a bit about depression here. I remember reading this article in 2017 when I was trying to learn more about her and it definitely moved me and gave me a lot of appreciation for how she fought despite her mental struggles. To anyone who hasn't read this article yet, please do, it's worth it :)

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On an unrelated note, I remember reading the below article from 2018 and thinking: Ash has so many great shots - why isn't she top 10 yet?! And then boom 2019 happened haha


It is time for a new survey to reflect the change and the talent on the rise. As in 2014, more than 20 coaches, players, former players and analysts have been polled. Each participant was asked to select a top three in each category with the focus on singles play. Greater weight was given to the votes of current tour-level coaches who regularly scout the leading women’s players.
Conclusions? Ashleigh Barty, a versatile 22-year-old Australian, might not have made it past the fourth round of a Grand Slam tournament in singles, but she has no shortage of admirers. As for Williams, she has slipped in some categories: forehand, movement and returning in particular. But at age 37 and even after playing just seven events in 2018, she can still hold her own in the ratings game.
 

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I doubt that she even wants to talk about since it's a privat very difficult situation and Ash isn't the person who will use it as an excuse for anything. That's what I respect in her too :)
She does talk about it when asked. But yes she will not used it as an excuse for anything


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Sounds like Ash Barty was effectively used as the poster girl for the final Brisbane 2032 games bid.
She'll be 36 then, and while that's probably too old for her to be a medal threat in singles, I can picture Barty playing a specific and reduced doubles calendar for a long time into her 30s.
 
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