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A report on the 1900 Olympics. Note the French source here calls it the World Championships of Tennis-the notion of it being an Olympic event wasn't really well established at this point.


Le Sport universel illustré | 1900-07-07 | Gallica

Charlotte Copper d Mlle Prevost 6-1 6-4

Many sources cite Mlle Prevost as go inf by Helene-but significantly no contemporary sources do so-merely calling her Mlle Prevost.


http://www.sports-reference.com/olympics/summer/1900/TEN/womens-singles.html
http://www.sports-reference.com/olympics/summer/1900/TEN/

Miss Charlotte Cooper-the first female to win an Olympic gold medal



Miss Cooper winning her medal in Paris on the Ile



Mlle Prevost-1900 French champion and runner-up to Miss Cooper.



Another photo said to be of Mlle Prevost

 

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https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tennis_women_1900.jpg




[Wiki partially correct description]

A. Gillou (maybe Kate Gillou?), French contestant, at the 1900 Olympic games Tennis tournament, at the Tennis court Cercles des Sports de l'Ile de Puteaux, Paris. Cover page of magazine La vie au grand air, No 97 from July 22nd, 1900.

Deutsch: A. Gillou (vielleicht auch Kate Gillou?), Französische Teilnehmerin beim Tennis bei den Olympischen Spielen 1900, auf der Tennisanlage Cercles des Sports de l'Ile de Puteaux, Paris. Titelseite der Zeitschrift La vie au grand air, No 97 vom 22. Juli 1900.

[Rollo's explanation]

A. Gillou is quite obviously Antoinette Gillou, sister of Katie Gillou. There is at present no record of her in the Olympic event itself, but there were many other events being held that same week at the Sports Club.
 

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If the site below is correct the club had 10 clay (sand) courts

The 1900 Olympics ? Charles E. Sands

The Olympic tennis competition was played at the Ile du Puteaux Club, an exclusive private tennis club located on a small island in the Seine. Five of the club’s ten courts were made available for the event beginning on July 6th. Charles Sands entered three events: Men’s Singles, Men’s Doubles and Mixed Doubles. Sands was well prepared for the competition. He had spent two years playing tennis in France prior to the Paris games, winning the Racquette D’Or—France’s highest award for court tennis—in both 1899 and 1900. However, British players dominated the Olympic tennis competition and Sands was defeated in the first round in each of his three events.
 

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Olympics results from 1900 providing sources:

http://library.la84.org/SportsLibrary/Mallon/1900.pdf

[from page 7]

Under Mérillon’s plans, the track and field athletics would be held on the grounds of the Racing Club of France, at the Croix-Catelan in the Bois de Boulogne; the swimming would takeplace at Asnières in the Seine River; the yachting was scheduled for both Meulan and Le Havre;
the fencing at the Tuilerie Gardens in the Palais des Expositions; the lawn tennis on the Ile de Puteaux; the gymnastics at Vincennes; the equestrian events at the Avenue de Breteuil; the cycling at the Parc des Princes; and the shooting at several different venues.

It all anticipatedthe Olympics that took place toward the end of the 20th century, with the events scattered in many venues, but without the advantage of easy transport and access to these venues. Coubertin attempted to salvage matters by issuing a bulletin urging athletic groups to support the new organization. He then began a tour of Europe during which he agreed to serve as an unoffcial liaison between the new organizing committee and foreign teams. He visited Prague,Berlin, Copenhagen, Stockholm, and Russia. The Olympic authorities of Sweden, Hungary, Aus-
tria, and Bohemia insisted on conducting all their correspondence through Coubertin, while inthe United States, Caspar Whitney and Professor Sloane reported that the information forth-coming from Paris was so vague and uncertain that they were about to cancel America’s participation.

Eventually, the new organizing committee conducted a myriad of sporting events alongside the great world’s fair of ¡900. The sporting events were rarely called “Olympic.” The term“Olympic Games” was discarded and replaced with “Concours internationaux d’exercises physiques et de sport.” In the press, the competitions were hailed variously as “International Games,” “International Championships,” “Paris Championships,” and “World Championships.” Occasionally in the foreign press one read of the “Olympian Games” or, rarely, “Olympic Games.”

Coubertin would later comment to his friends: “It’s a miracle that the Olympic Movement survived that celebration!”
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)

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A Famous Tennis Club

About three-quarters of an hour's drive from the centre of Paris, and situated in the parish of Neuilly, lies the beautiful Isle of Puteaux, where the well-known Société de Sport de l'Ile de Puteaux, so closely connected with the development of lawn tennis in France, holds supreme sway. It may be mentioned that quite long ago enterprising members of leading French clubs and devotees of sport had the idea in their minds of founding a club in the Bois de Boulonge where tennis could be played, but the difficulty of finding sufficient financial support stood in the way at the outset. M. La Montagne and Mr. Edmund Kelly, however, approached the Vicomte Léon de Janzé, and pointed to the possibility of founding a club on the Ile de Puteaux, belonging to the Dowager Baronne James de Rothschild. Setting immediately to work, the Vicomte de Janzé secured from the owner, on very low terms, an annual lease for a small portion of the north-eastern extremity of the Ile de Puteaux, and shortly afterwards a financial company was formed to supply the very modest capital required. Next a committee was appointed, two-thirds of its members being foreigners, as Frenchmen at that time did not know much of the new sport.

M. Nicolas Escalier, one of the shareholders of the new company, undertook to prepare plans for a small house, which he little thought was destined to become the first of a series of buildings which now has the appearance of a little village.

By the spring nearly two hundred applicants had been admitted to membership by the committee, two tennis courts had been laid out, the small club-house had been completed, and a boathouse erected. It was in this boathouse, converted into a ballroom, that the Grand Duchess Vladimir inaugurated the club. On this occasion she danced a quadrille with the president, Vicomte Léon de Janzé, as partner, their vis-à-vis being Miss Helen Munroe and M. La Montange, the treasurer. M. La Montagne's witty comment is still remembered: "C'est la 'grande duchesse' qui danse en face de la 'Belle Hélène'."

Of the two hundred members at the time of the club's origin, about 75 per cent. were British, or Americans, but a liking for lawn tennis was gradually developed in France. French members became more and more numerous, until now the proportion has been reversed, and there are at least seventy-five Frenchmen for every twenty-five foreign members.

From two hundred in 1885 the membership of the club has increased to five hundred in 1895, and now there are more than twelve hundred permanent members. Foreign applicants are admitted permanently after temporary membership for one year, and only on giving proof of continuous residence in France.

The first soirée dansante was given towards the year 1895, but the small salon of the early days was found much too small. M. Charles Morice, who had succeeded M.N. Escalier as club architect, discussed enlargements with M. de Janzé, and in the following year a large verandah was built on the sides of the tennis courts, while the number of dressing-rooms was greatly increased. Shortly afterwards attention was turned to the boathouse, which was moved to another spot and greatly enlarged. Secretary's offices, kitchens and outhouses were next added, thus completing the village in the Ile de Puteaux.

In the meantime, however, the members of the committee, under the prudent direction of their president, had a difficulty to face. They were led to fear that their efforts had given too great a value to the ground. The Barons de Rothschild, who had inherited the property from their mother, expressed their intention of purchasing the portion of the island occupied by the club.

After lengthy negotiations the parties came to an agreement. The deed of sale was signed on the same day as the constitution of a société immobilière to take over the grounds at the north-eastern end of the island, the capital being subscribed in twenty-four hours by the members of the Société de Sport de l'Ile de Puteaux. The building operations referred to above were decided upon at that time.

From the point of view of tennis, the Société de Sport de l'Ile de Puteaux organises each year on its excellent courts handicap and championship tournaments reserved for its members, and also Schools Championship Singles, which event is always played on the courts of the club. Other matches are the Women's Championship Singles and Mixed Doubles of the Union des Sociétés Françaises de Sports Athlétiques.

These matches commence on May 20 and continue until about July 10. In 1900 the athletic sports committee of the Exposition Universelle trusted the committee of the Société de Sport de l'Ile de Puteaux with the organisation of an international lawn tennis tournament, for which it gave prizes to the value of 10,000 fr.

The success which attended this tournament has left so lasting an impression on the minds of sportsmen that it is unnecessary to refer to it.

Since that period, with the exception of last year, the S.S.I.P. has given an international tournament at the commencement of every July, when the competitors have been drawn from among the best English, American and French players. R.F. and H.L. Doherty, Gore, Simond, Caridia, Lewis, Mahoney, Decugis, Worth, and the brothers Vacherot, are among the many who have taken part in these tournaments. This year an important Open Tournament will be held on the 23rd June with Mr. G.M. Simond as referee and handicapper.

Source: Lawn Tennis and Badminton – May 29, 1907, pp. 73–74
 
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