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None of you answered my previous post so FU! 🖕

I started reading Drive Your Plow Over The Bones Of the Dead.
 

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Just finished: The Moon and Sixpence by W. Somerset Maughan. Totally brilliant, as usual.

Starting: The wreck of the Mary Deare, by Hammond Innes
 

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Ann Patchett, The Dutch House.

I fell in love with her prose when I first read Bel Canto. Her writing is absolutely sublime... I just wish she would put out more, like Asimov!
 

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None of you answered my previous post so FU! 🖕

I started reading Drive Your Plow Over The Bones Of the Dead.
I couldn't answer as I hadn't read any of those two books. My father just started reading the PT translation of "Drive Your Plow Over The Bones Of the Dead", and his initial impressions have been positive, but when he talked to me about it on Saturday he was only c. 50 pages in.
 

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I couldn't answer as I hadn't read any of those two books. My father just started reading the PT translation of "Drive Your Plow Over The Bones Of the Dead", and his initial impressions have been positive, but when he talked to me about it on Saturday he was only c. 50 pages in.
She is one of Poland's most respect writer and was the winner of 2018 Nobel in Literature
 

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"Home Stretch" by Graham Norton of all the people. It came out last month. It was the blurb that attracted me in the beginning - I didn't even think it would be the same guy when I saw the cover. I always liked him as a talk show host but I didn't know he was this talented in another field :D.

Highly recommend to whom an Irish gay-themed drama story sounds interesting.

Also reading Manning Clark's History of Australia.
 

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Two re-reads, that impressed my at the time, both set in 70s America.

Trance - Christopher Sorrentino
Based on the Patty Hearst kidnapping by the very weird and messy beyond belief Symbionese Liberation Army, and her transformation from spoilt rich heiress to gun toting icon, bank robber, pig-killer Tania. It's a long one, a bit dense at times, but worth persevering. Overall I think it's a great read, and ofc a great story, unexpectedly and hugely funny, and captures so well the political and social upheavals of the times. It's a bit eerie that her kidnapping was predicted in almost minute detail a couple of years before it happened by two obscure novels by unknown writers. One of them didn't write anything else, used a pseudonym and only communicated through a PO box linked to a firm that operated as a CIA front.

The Virgin Suicides - Jeffrey Eugenides
I think this is the best first novel I've read in years and years. It's just wonderful. I love the dreamlike and hazy quality of the story, probably because it's told decades later, by someone who is not even named, so that made it easier for me to become involved, and despite the topic, five sisters commiting suicide, and there being some unbearable small moments of loss and despair, it's far from depressing. There's a lot of black humor too and the writting is near perfect.
 

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Shovel Yourself Out Of The Shit
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