Tennis Forum banner

201 - 220 of 249 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
Vettel has achieved more than Hamilton since 2011, but Hamilton has far more endorsement earnings than Vettel every year at least since 2013. I couldn't find the data of 2011 & 2012, but most probably Hamilton has been more marketable than Vettel ever since the former won F1 world champion in 2008, and that marketing advantage over the latter never changed.



I saw two descriptions on how race played a role in the endorsement gap:

1) Pova isn't more attractive than Rena (because, they insist, beauty is subjective), but sponsors prefer Pova over Rena simply because Pova is a white girl, who is viewed more favorably among the white majority of tennis fans.

2) Sponsors prefer Pova over Rena because Pova is viewed as more attractive, but the standard of attractiveness here is Eurocentric (thus racist, they say).

I don't totally rule out (1) but I think (2) is much closer to what really happened. However, I don't consider rooting for athletes along racial lines or European standards of beauty as racist.
:haha: call me a racist, but that is just delusional
This is the same with Sloane vs Aljona: Sloane will get more endorsement simply because she's the better looking one
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,418 Posts
When Maria walked out on David Letterman in 2008, 42 seconds.....wow.....wow....let me put it another way....omigod.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MVQnQKV3oo


I understand....not all people trust David Letterman's instincts....I thought he was right about this.... David Letterman Calls Donald Trump a "Damaged Human Being...To Be Shunned"
but he was dead on about Maria.....she was and is so special she needs a category of her own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,309 Posts
I just finished the book. What a good read. She's way more candid than I thought she would be. Seems like she still have some love for Grigor and their break up was not all that bad.

And sounds like she's gonna keep playing for a while. :)

Also the things she said about Serena wasn't even all that bad with context -- people who criticize the excerpts clearly haven't read the book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,052 Posts
Her book sells like candy. Who would have guessed :eek:h:
I know Maria's brand is appealing, overall timing is everything (post her first GS appearance in NYC). And I can only thank those haters who keep bringing Serena's name which in the end only boost the book's sales :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,342 Posts
Her book sells like candy. Who would have guessed :eek:h:
I know Maria's brand is appealing, overall timing is everything (post her first GS appearance in NYC). And I can only thank those haters who keep bringing Serena's name which in the end only boost the book's sales :lol:
people don't even realize that. They are this bad versed in marketing. They are doing Pova's marketing team a favor. Such is the sad state of affair today.

At my time we were aware of things like that. Then I remember people are brainwashed by social media/podcasts and nothing surprises me anymore. You can't escape the brainwashing anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,913 Posts
I think another key reason for Maria's endorsement success too which is often overlooked is the good and strategic job her team has done building her brand with the right kind of deals, rather than going all over the place for the exposure and money.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,699 Posts
"Russian-American" :spit:

Just blasted through the whole thing in a single sitting. A really candid, compelling read. The section where she and Yuri first get to the States is easily the best part. I would have liked a little bit more on her career post-surgery - even her French Open wins are glossed over in just a couple of pages each - but overall I'm really satisfied.

Miscellaneous thoughts:

-Serena does come up quite a bit, but that shouldn't be surprising, considering how their paths crossed in an almost cosmic way so many times. I think it's clear they're both pressed af about each other for different reasons, but Maria clearly respects the hell out of her.
-A big chunk of the book is (obviously) devoted to Wimbledon 2004. I was surprised that she felt she played her best match of the fortnight against Hantuchova :spit:
-I was also surprised to hear her admit that she never really jelled with Hogstedt off-court. They seemed like such a good pairing, and they were, but she was very clear that she kept him around solely because he brought good results. She clearly has a great deal more personal loyalty to her team now. Sven will almost certainly be her coach until the end.
-I'd say with a great deal of certainty that Clijsters was the only player on tour who Maria actually likes. She had some very nice things to say about Kim in one passage.
-She planned the 2017 US Open to be her last tournament, and it's funny that it turned out to be a rebirth of sorts. She showed she's still got it and there's plenty of work to be done. Based on the last couple of chapters she seems totally committed to getting back to where she was, and I can't wait to see it happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,029 Posts
Did read it a week ago.

First of all, how I wish the epithet she used as the title was relentless or something of the sort rather than unstoppable. Yes, on the one hand, solely so that she could avoid ridicule but to me there were a few things that did derail and 'stop' her and Yuri; it was the fact that they persevered that is the commendable, aspiring story.

I loved the backstory, if you will, it was captivating and it gave me a bigger appreciation of what it has taken to achieve what she has. Hearing that tagline of 'you came to America at 7-years-old and you did not see your mom for 2 years' sounds tough but the book really puts it into perspective. Yuri really is a trooper.

As to the controversy, it is a bit of a 'damned if you do and damned if you don't'' type of situation. She had to talk about Serena since Serena has in a way defined her career. Do I think there was some racial coding going on? No. The impression I got, she was painting herself as the underdog and how unbelievable it was that she did win at 17. Do I wish she was cognizant enough not to use that description of Serena? Yes, yet I do not believe she is well-versed or aware enough of the political climate and the racial issues to know better. Let's face it she is a rich white woman so has not faced adversary connected to how she looks.

As to the overall Serena-themed talk, Maria is a human being, a flawed one so while I am not enamoured with the pettiness and bitterness that come through at times, it is what it is. It is a true representation of how she feels and it is understandable after being basically humbled time and time again; it must be a hard pill to swallow for such a strong-willed individual as herself. That relationship is a very complex one with the media and other factors playing a role and pitting them against each other. Maria has been painted as the emanation of white privilege( not that there is not some merit to it, yet it has been overblown) and I have no doubt that Serena sees her so as well.

Overall, enjoyed it quite a bit apart from the Serena & meldonium sections. Wish she did not gloss over most of the stuff post-Wimbledon, especially, the comeback years; wish there was more on her struggles in 2009-2010.

Random tid-bits:
- she read Sasha to filth for being a 18th century neanderthal;
- I so wished she kept working with Lansdorp;
- calling Henin a mosquito :spit:;
- weird that she discarded the Ebersol relationship as not being 'serious';
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,913 Posts
Surely her shoulder stuff would've gotten more airtime without the meldonium saga. It's interesting to think how that would've changed the book given that it was in the works before that mess.

Would she have gone more into tour stuff? More Yuri stuff? Or maybe it'd be just shorter (doubt the second two).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,699 Posts
Surely her shoulder stuff would've gotten more airtime without the meldonium saga. It's interesting to think how that would've changed the book given that it was in the works before that mess.

Would she have gone more into tour stuff? More Yuri stuff? Or maybe it'd be just shorter (doubt the second two).
From what I remember she only mentions Meldonium in the first chapter and in the closing. The second chapter also reads like an intro, so I'm guessing the rest of it was mostly kept as is.

The book was clearly supposed to be released as she was retiring, so I'm hoping that we'll get an updated version when she really does leave the game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,906 Posts
Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: Maria Sharapova on ‘Unstoppable’

By JOHN WILLIAMS SEPT. 24, 2017

Since shocking the tennis world with her win over Serena Williams in the 2004 Wimbledon finals, Maria Sharapova has spent time as the No. 1 player in the world, a glamorous pitchwoman whose endorsement deals run in the tens of millions of dollars and a figure of controversy. Last year, the Russian-American star tested positive for meldonium, a drug that had been recently banned by the International Tennis Federation. She returned to the court earlier this year after serving a 15-month suspension. Sharapova has now also written a memoir, “Unstoppable,” looking back at her life and career. It arrives a few months after she turned 30 — not exactly old age in tennis but getting there. In the book, Sharapova writes about Serena Williams, who turns 36 this month and continues to dominate the sport: “Serena and I should be friends: we love the same thing, we have the same passion. … But we are not friends — not at all.” Below, in an email interview, Sharapova talks about her unlikely beginnings, how her book transformed into a rallying cry for overachievers, the way art and fashion inspire her and more.

When did you first get the idea to write this book?

From the moment I won Wimbledon, at age 17, my career has been documented. But it was as if someone just put me inside a television screen and handed me the Wimbledon plate. I seemed to have come out of nowhere. When the questions started pouring in about how I got there, when I began telling the story of what brought me to that moment of victory, no one believed it. Your mother was pregnant with you when the Chernobyl reactor blew up, only 30 kilometers away? You were spotted by Martina Navratilova at age 6? Your father convinced a U.S. immigration officer to give him a visa to bring his 6½-year-old daughter to the United States to become a tennis player? I would tell journalists these stories, but no one really believed them, because it was such a crazy tale. So I decided to write about it.

What’s the most surprising thing you learned while writing it?

I think, first of all, I was really struck and moved by the tough decisions and the setbacks my father, Yuri, had to face in our early years here. I interviewed him extensively for this book, because I was so little when we came here. I hadn’t really thought about how tough it had been for him — to leave his home, my mother (who couldn’t get a visa for years), to land in the middle of the night in Florida with no English at all. We came here with only $700, and he lost that almost immediately. We moved through a series of Florida tennis factories before we were secure. But my father is a believer in getting through. He took endless odd jobs; he did everything he could to make my career happen. I interviewed a lot of my coaches, too, for the book. That was so interesting to me. On the court, it is just you facing your opponent. But the truth is, you are always part of a team.

I also was surprised by how comfortable I became, writing this book, with honesty and vulnerability. I’ve faced my career and my job with laser tunnel vision, my guard up. But in these pages is the young girl who had to overcome obstacles over and over again.

In what way is the book you wrote different from the book you set out to write?

As I worked on it, and when I read it now, the book became less about my life and more about inspiring others who have a dream of being the best. I was never the strongest, the fastest or the smartest among other kids. But I’ve always loved to hit. For me, it’s the one thing that can fix any problem. I had a coach once who said, “Hit until you win.” Knock me down? I get back up. Again and again, my father taught me to do that. Is it being competitive? Russian? Disciplined? Maybe all three.

Who is a creative person (not a writer) who has influenced you and your work?

One of my favorite artists is a Japanese woman named Yayoi Kusama. I am really inspired by individuals who consistently do out-of-the-box work; work that makes you wonder, think, question. Things that don’t necessarily have an explanation.

I also enjoy following Sarah Burton’s career as creative director of Alexander McQueen. She took on an incredible challenge and delivers, collection after collection. And I like her approach: she stays out of the limelight, but behind the scenes her creativity is as newsworthy as ever.

Persuade someone to read “Unstoppable” in 50 words or less.

This is not a book about tennis, but about a little girl with a big dream: to become a tennis champion. It’s about what it takes to achieve that. Courage. Discipline. The drive to overcome setbacks. Because there will be plenty of them. You have to believe you’re unstoppable.

This interview has been condensed and edited.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/24/books/review/maria-sharapova-unstoppable-book.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,342 Posts
what a self-serving interview . It looks like it's to be made for some Trump supporter site. The mythical and wrong self-made man.

And I see the level of writing is as shitty as always. How many times did she use the word inspiring ?(cc @aknox :grin2: )

She is completely brainwashed by the gibberish stuff she listens to which consists of inspiring, amazing, great, inspire, inspiration, inspired , achieve, greatness, strong, so so strong .

I get that getting old and losing what you once have is though, but man, it hit her really hard.

And vulnerability is not what she thinks it is.
One of my favorite artists is a Japanese woman named Yayoi Kusama. I am really inspired by individuals who consistently do out-of-the-box work; work that makes you wonder, think, question. Things that don’t necessarily have an explanation.
and that's her problem and why she listens to what she listens or watches. She's adverse to anything factual, purposeful, of the why's , to things with substance. No wonder she likes those inspirational bs quotes. As empty as her the "art" she follows.

The sooner she goes away from where she is and distance herself from certain people, the better . They already damaged her enough.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aknox

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,671 Posts
It's a sweet, lovely interview, @fed_up

But you're on a roll. Lol

After googling Yayoi Kusama, erm :unsure:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,418 Posts
what a self-serving interview . It looks like it's to be made for some Trump supporter site. The mythical and wrong self-made man.

And I see the level of writing is as shitty as always. How many times did she use the word inspiring ?(cc @aknox :grin2: )

She is completely brainwashed by the gibberish stuff she listens to which consists of inspiring, amazing, great, inspire, inspiration, inspired , achieve, greatness, strong, so so strong .

I get that getting old and losing what you once have is though, but man, it hit her really hard.

And vulnerability is not what she thinks it is.


and that's her problem and why she listens to what she listens or watches. She's adverse to anything factual, purposeful, of the why's , to things with substance. No wonder she likes those inspirational bs quotes. As empty as her the "art" she follows.

The sooner she goes away from where she is and distance herself from certain people, the better . They already damaged her enough.
Among the many things for which men have an advantage...I can be a fan of Maria Sharapova and Katy Tur and pretend it has nothing to do with their 6' plus imperfect bodies, but rather because I sincerely admire them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,906 Posts
"I do not bitch. I do not throw my racket. I do not threaten the line judge. I do not quit."
Unstoppable: My Life So Far - Maria Sharapova
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,418 Posts
"I do not bitch. I do not throw my racket. I do not threaten the line judge. I do not quit."
Unstoppable: My Life So Far - Maria Sharapova
Something suspicious about that. She certainly has enough money to order a hit on that line judge that knocked her out of the US open with his free advice to not challenge the out call that was in.
 
201 - 220 of 249 Posts
Top