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From Wertheim:

"Remember a few weeks (months?) ago when we discussed how seldom tennis players have appeared on Saturday Night Live? I'm not at liberty to say much more, but star the night of Nov. 8 on your calendar."

I'm guessing Andy Roddick or a Williams sister.
 

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OOOO- you mean The Reverend Margaret Court is going to host. I'll stay up for that! :lol:
 

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ughh...must be roddick. The first Saturday Night Live I'll miss in about a decade.
 

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yup its Roddick. vamos with SNL:banana:
 

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It could be Sampras.......getting all frisky and carefree now that hes retired. But, yawn, itll prob be Roddick. I wonder how long on camera he'll last without busting into tears...hehe :D :D
 

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Roddick: The new 'It' guy


By Karen Crouse, Palm Beach Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, September 9, 2003



NEW YORK -- Andy Roddick was no stranger to Times Square. He had walked along Broadway before. But never like this, with a phalanx of photographers backpedaling furiously to capture every stride.

"This is a little embarrassing," Roddick thought to himself as he tried to affect a look of nonchalance, as if it were just another manic Monday.

Roddick was walking arm-in-arm with his girlfriend, Mandy Moore, drawing stares with every step he took. It seemed that everybody and his mugger recognized the Boca Raton resident as the newly crowned U.S. Open champion.

For the first time in the celebrity couple's year-old relationship, it was Moore's face that people couldn't quite place. One bicycle messenger pedaled past the singer-slash-actress and cried out, "Hello, Britney."

Roddick nearly rolled on the sidewalk in merriment when he heard that one. Moore would get the last laugh. A block later, Broadway and 45th, a man clad only in a cowboy hat, cowboy boots and white briefs stopped in mid-note of his Like a Naked Cowboy parody of a Glenn Campbell hit to gawk at Roddick.

Yes, the world's No. 2-ranked tennis player picked up all sorts of new fans Sunday with his 6-3, 7-6 (2), 6-3 victory against Juan Carlos Ferrero, the world No. 1, in his first Grand Slam final. President Bush's people were in touch with Roddick's people to see whether the two of them could hook up on the telephone.

Roddick was noncommittal. He's awfully busy these days.

Mr. Bush would appreciate this: So many people now want to shake his hand, Roddick tucked a miniature bottle of antibacterial gel in his blue jeans pocket.

"It's craziness," said Roddick, who got 4 1/2 hours of sleep after dining and dancing much of the night away. "I would have never imagined what it was like to win a Grand Slam and it's aftermath. This is all a bit of a trip for me. I think the fun part starts when I get a chance to breathe."


The dark side of glory

The world got claustrophobic for Roddick really fast. One hour and 42 minutes was all it took for the 21-year-old to become the last man standing in a U.S. Open fraught with rain and ire. He left everybody swooning over his serve, but in the end the 123 aces he collected during the fortnight were all smoke and subterfuge.

More than his heat, his heart was what cinched Roddick's first major title. It was bigger than the 141-mph ace he delivered against Ferrero, stouter than his whipcord forehands.

It took the mettle and moxie of a street urchin to survive innumerable weather delays, weather a third-set match point against him in his semifinal and triumph over the sniping of his fellow competitors and the anxiety that comes with being a nation's No. 1 hope.

People can shred any picture they might have had of Roddick as a coddled child of privilege, another American kid born with a silver racket in his hands. His hunger at the U.S. Open was voracious; his victory, immensely satisfying.

Now comes the hard part. Nothing rankles like success. What he gains in popularity with the public, he loses in popularity among his peers. That's just the way it is.

The more you separate yourself from the pack, the more fiercely the pack bites at your heels. Roddick can consider himself warned. "The players who are winning the most," said Jim Courier, a four-time Grand Slam singles champion, "are not going to be universally liked."

Roddick is hard to hate. He's polite, respectful and as unostentatious as the tennis season is long. That didn't stop Ivan Ljubicic, whom Roddick vanquished in a tense second-round match at the Open, from saying nobody in the locker room likes Roddick because of his high jinks on the court.

Ljubicic amended himself, saying "some people" in the locker room can't stand Roddick's antics. Either way, it was a curious statement, considering Roddick was the aggrieved party to the Mount Vesuvius of all eruptions in men's tennis this year, that being the spewing of Greg Rusedski during his defeat to Roddick at Wimbledon.

The truth of the matter is, Flavio Saretta flashed more emotion during his third-round loss to Roddick than Roddick did in all his matches. But there are players in every locker room who can't stand the truth.

Human nature dictates that some of his peers liked Roddick a lot better when he had a capricious backhand and no clue how to construct a point. It's only natural that some opponents would find this guy with the shored up backhand, the maddening serves and a 19-match winning streak no fun at all.

Jimmy Connors, an emotive eight-time Grand Slam singles champion, was reviled in his heyday. His personality could be grating but his greatness was what turned a lot of people off.

"Criticism is a part of everybody's success," Connors, a fan of Roddick, said before Sunday's final. "And, you know, for Andy to have made a jump to the forefront like he has over the past (few) months, criticism's all a part of that. It's the way you handle it that counts."


Ready to handle fame

That's where Roddick is fortunate. Starting with -- but not limited to -- his immediate family, he has in place a support system so sound he doesn't need to go outside looking for validation. Roddick plans to buy a second home, in Austin, Texas, to be closer to his two brothers.

It helps immensely that his girlfriend is someone who has seen how unpopular success can make a person. Moore was irked but hardly surprised when she heard about Ljubicic's comments. After she released her first album and started compiling movie credits, some of her peers in Orlando inexplicably turned on her.

"Junior year, I went to homecoming and I had girls come up to me and cuss me out, saying 'You don't belong here. These aren't your friends,' " Moore said as she sat off to the side at a Times Square restaurant, while Roddick conducted one round of interviews after another.

"It was devastating," she said. "It hits you really hard. When you get to the top, for some reason people want to tear you down. I know Andy's going to have to deal with that. But he'll be fine. He's really good at letting things like that roll off his back. A lot better than I am."

If they resented him last week, just wait until Ljubicic and Co. catch Roddick's act on Total Request Live, The Today Show, Regis and Kelly and the Late Show with David Letterman, four of the stops Monday on his victory lap around Manhattan.

The producers of Saturday Night Live also have called. They'd like Roddick to host the show in early November. Roddick isn't so sure he has the game for that one. "That's a scary one because I'm terrible at that stuff," he said. "But I'll have fun with it if it happens."

That's Roddick. Put him in front of a camera and he'll flash a smile, whether he's totally comfortable with it or not. He is a marketer's dream. He's hard on tennis balls and easy on the eyes, and when they dished out personalities Roddick requested seconds.


The Roddick Effect

Instead of resenting Roddick, the other players on the tour ought to stop and consider what his sustained success can mean for their bottom line.

Ferrero, Roger Federer, Lleyton Hewitt -- the tour isn't lacking for young talent. "I think it's gonna make for a real exciting group," Roddick said. "I'm just kind of pumped to be part of it. It'll be fun to see us trying to steal the titles from one another."

It'll be fun, certainly. What'll make it fruitful is if Roddick is the one grabbing the headlines. That's what tennis needs to get the U.S. public to pay attention.

Roddick is talented and telegenic enough to make tennis cool again. If he can lasso the American audience, all the players will enjoy the ride.

"Look at Tiger Woods," Courier said. "His first couple years on the Tour there was a lot of grumbling about the way he acted. The other players didn't like how he pumped his fist after putts, the emotion he showed on the golf course. Now he's providing a meal ticket for all the players on the Tour and everybody likes him. If Andy does the same thing for tennis, then we'll see how the other players regard him."

The main thing is, Roddick's willing to be the face of men's tennis. He's OK with having a day or a few that are not his own, that are given up to interviews and photo sessions and TV appearances.

"If my winning promotes the sport and makes it bigger and better, then awesome," Roddick said. "I'm all for it. It's given me the opportunity to have this amazing life."

Today, he vowed, "it's back to reality."



Sorry, I deleted the last sentence 'cause they took the Lord's name in vain! :eek:
 

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Serena would have been their first choice. but in light of her sister's death it's probably gonna be the fencepost. Lud! :rolleyes:
 

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i don't suppose it could be Anna? John did say a "tennis player".
 

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I'm hearing that the suprise host will be Pete Sampras!
 

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Then why do you talk about him all the time? :confused:
 
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