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I do not worry much about the brand I look at the spec's of individual racquets. Most brands make a few good racquets and a few that are not good. I look for racquets with the best feel, touch and control and don't worry about power because racquets built for power are bad for your arm if you want more power get an elastic string and lower the tension. I found a great list of the best racquets for tennis elbow at http://tenniselbowracquet.com/tennis-racquet .
Good luck and keep playing with the right racquet tennis should be a sport for a lifetime!
 

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I think that yes, the various brands have distinct personalities that are consistent across their frames. Since I'm a car buff, I'll compare them to those (US variants)

In my experience:

Wilson--the Honda of rackets. They really do pretty much everything well, even if they aren't great at any particular single aspect. Usually have moderately good feel, middling stiffness, if a Wilson isn't your favorite stick it's probably your second favorite stick.

Head--More like old-school Audis. Not to everyone's liking with some just plain weird engineering and feel, but if you like them and know how to control them, they are really good. I haven't played with them much (since I find the hard to use) but they give really immediate feedback--almost too much for me. At the same time, I find them a bit floppy, even the ones that are supposed to be stiff.

Prince--classic 'merican muscle, like a Camaro or Mustang. Floaty, not a lot of feel or feedback, but oodles of V-8 power no matter how crappy your swing is. Even their rackets that are supposed to be "control" rackets are more about power than control.

Babolat--Porsche. Not necessarily super better premium, but just that they take a basic racket (think the 911) and roll out 37 different customized versions of it that all have good stiffness and good feedback, but the power really does range from a 6 cyclinder that's pretty tepid up to triple-turbo charged models. I think that's the reason they're selling so well right now is that anyone can find a Babolat they like.

Just my opinions. The funny thing is another person will contradict everything I say, and be completely right without me being wrong. That's why you have to playtest rackets.
I loved this analogy too and, anyone on Dunlop racquets?
 

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A lot of places will let you demo racquets, so you can just take a couple with you to see what you like. Keep doing that with different racquets and you will figure out what works best with your game.
Hey don't mind try to visit this site tennisracketpro.com you will find best rackets variety and reviews.
 

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I would spend at the very least $50.

Good brands are Wilson, Head, Prince, and Babolat.

Look for racquets where the frame is one solid piece. Cheaper racquets often have a two piece frame. You can see the separation of the two frame pieces at the lower part of the head, where the strings attach at the bottom of the head.

Grip size is extremely important. If you have a small hand you will likely want a grip around 4 1/4" - 4 3/8". Larger hands will use 4 1/2 - 4 5/8".

Don't get the wrong size grip, or it will make the racquet difficult to hold.

Also, if you are very small in height, they make shorter length racquets for little people. They are 26.5" long, and you can find good quality models in this shorter length.

If you are thinking about spending a little more for a better racquet, ask the store if they have a demo program. Some stores have demos they can lend you to try them out before you buy them.

I also recommend finding a practice tennis wall in your neighborhood that you can spend time working on your strokes. Some public tennis courts have practice walls. Also, schoolyards sometimes have big walls.

If you decide to try to find a decent used one on Craigslist, you might get a very good deal. Check the frame of a used racquet carefully to make sure it has no cracks.

Many times when racquets become discontinued, they drop the prices down significantly in stores like Big 5. You can sometimes get a racquet that previously sold for $200 for around $60 - $80.
 
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