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Discussion Starter #241
Game 302 - Over 4M views





Kim-Tae Seong - "Bi-ik-ryu-rin" (Korean Drama "Lovers")



SF: 8th (90 points) ; F: 9th (74 points)​

Next theme was Over 4M views. The theme itself says it what we had to find. I submitted the song by Korean artist Kim-Tae Seong, who produced popular songs for Korean dramas. I like the traditional sounds and wanted to give it a try in this game. :) I highly recommend watching Korean drama "Lovers". It was interesting.

Talking about game, I did not know the song I initially submitted was sent, so I had to replace the song ASAP. I was even happier with my replacement pick. Finishing in Top 10 was a pleasant surprise for this cute instrumental. :love:
 

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Discussion Starter #242
Game 303 - Last Day Of The World



XTC - "This World Over"



SF: 9th (71 points) ; F: 16th (58 points)​

Next theme was "Last Day Of The World". We had to capture the mood of that last day. :p I chose XTC, because his catalogue fit the theme. I was very surprised that they qualified and thanks Matt for liking it more than me. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #243 (Edited)
Game 304 - 2019



TR/ST - "Destroyer"



SF: 4th (131 points) ; F: 9th (69 points) - non-voting!​

Adam won in game 299, so he had to choose the next theme. He picked "2019", hoping to attract more players, which was a success. I went with TR/ST, I know they won the game with "Iris", but I thought that Iris was not their best song.
The final was expected. Despite I forgot to vote, it got in the Top 10, which was a great result. Shvedbarilescu won this game with Iggy Pop's "Love's Missing". It was a good game.

TR/ST (previously known as Trust) is a Canadian electronic music project of Robert Alfons. It was formed as a band in 2010 when Alfons met Maya Postepski of Austra.[7] The project has spawned four albums so far: TRST (2012), Joyland (2014), The Destroyer (Part 1) and The Destroyer (Part 2) (2019). Alfons has also produced remixes for Feist, Moby, Zhala and Jonna Lee.
 

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Discussion Starter #244
Game 305 - By The Fire



Julius Brockington - "Forty Nine Reasons"



SF: 4th (104 points) ; F: 9th (71 points)​

Game 305, and the theme is "By The Fire". I had imagined cold winter days and me staying near the camin or just enjoying the day in my "warm" room. By capturing the current atmosphere, I went with "Forty-Nine Reasons", because there are the things I always liked to think about and found the reason why it happened. Including all of this, I was pretty happy with my choice. It finished in Top 10 in this quality edition. :)


Julius Brockington is an American producer, arranger and keyboard player who was active in the funk and soul genres the 1970s-80s. He released two solo studio albums, Sophisticated Funk and The United Chair, and played in bands Larry Young’s Fuel (not the 1975 album credited to Larry Young but the band of the same name) on the 1976 album Spaceball, The Brockingtons and appeared on a few funk compilations. He arranged and produced albums for Larry Hilton, Rosalyn & Charles and Benny Johnson.

Not much is known about him. It was difficult to find any facts about his life outside of song credits and even they were hard to verify, as well as a an almost sinister lack of pictures or supporting sources, as if he was lost to time by just being a few years out of sync. He did not achieve major levels of fame and notoriety outside of the funk scene back in the 70s, but he has been sampled by a few rap and hip-hop artists, most notably in the Jurrasic 5 track “Freedom”, which was released on the album Power in Numbers in 2002 and as its own single in 2003. He was also sampled by Madlib on instrumental tracks “Another Bag of Bomb (No Seeds)”-Julius-Brockington-Got-to-Be-There/) and “Two for Pay Jay (No Dough, No Show)-Julius-Brockington-The-Magic-Horse-Forty-Nine-Reasons/)“, both released on Beat Konducta Vol. 5-6: A Tribute To… (Dil Cosby and Dil Withers Suite) in 2008.

(Genius.com - reference)
 
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Discussion Starter #245
Game 306 - Chaos!​


Don Cherry - "Brown Rice"



SF: 1st (131 points) ; F: 3rd (102 points) non-voting!

Upcoming theme was "Chaos!". We had to choose a song that we believe is made out of chaos or has anything "chaotic" in the song, does not matter if it's video or the whole song.
I went with Don Cherry... don't get me wrong, I adore his music, but someone might find his music too chaotic for their liking. The arrangements are phenomenal, the vocals, everything! :p
It was first in the semi, but had I voted, it would have been second. I will take it as it is. I was so happy with that 3rd place in the final and I am glad that many people voted for this eargasmic piece! :)


he second track from Tomorrow Is the Question — Ornette Coleman’s 1959 wake-up call to the fusty hard bop movement — is a medium tempo blues, “Tears Inside.” After the statement of the tune’s two-beat, countrified-bebop theme, trumpeter Don Cherry plays a solo that — for all its frail beauty and general adherence to modern jazz’s harmonic conventions — sounds as if it might have been played by Miles Davis or Chet Baker. Coleman and Cherry were vanguardists, to be sure, and they were received as such by critics, musicians, and audiences alike. Even so, today, in listening to these early free jazz sides, one wonders what all the fuss was about, for it’s clear that both musicians — especially Cherry — played in a style derived from the mainstream of jazz’s development.

Naturally, the passing of four decades provides us a perspective denied listeners at the time; changes that seem slight to us today were magnified then. Coleman and Cherry’s elastic relationship to pitch and swing-time were certainly a liberation from the tyranny of equal temperament and literal pulse. Despite the music’s revolutionary characteristics, however, no one would now deny that the work of these men is an extension or interpretation of the jazz tradition. This is particularly obvious in Cherry’s case; abstracted from his contexts, Don Cherry’s style was in a real sense grounded in bebop. He wasn’t an especially strong bebop player by classic standards — his range and facility were somewhat limited, for one thing — but externally, his style bore the marks of modern jazz in terms of melody, harmony, rhythm, and phrasing.

Evaluating Cherry in classic terms is a mistake, for like Miles Davis — and Coleman, for that matter — concepts of Western musical objectivity were nearly irrelevant to his work. Cherry was not gifted with extraordinary chops, but those are classicist concerns, and his was a wholly romantic art. Cherry’s greatest strength was less easily quantified, less tangible: an ability to convey emotional depth via a subtle manipulation of musical elements. An improvised Don Cherry line might bear all the typical contours of bebop, but Cherry micro-managed every aspect of his playing, rhythmically, harmonically, melodically, timbrally, and dynamically. Like Coleman, Cherry’s sound came as close to the expressive qualities of the human voice as was instrumentally possible. And his playing was utterly spontaneous; Cherry was among the most unpredictable of improvisers. His frequent stutters in mid-solo may have stemmed from a limited vocabulary of canned phrases, but his resultant recoveries were the stuff of which great jazz is made.

Cherry first attained prominence with Coleman, with whom he began playing around 1957. At that time Cherry’s instrument of choice was a pocket trumpet (or cornet) — a miniature version of the full-sized model. The smaller instrument — in Cherry’s hands, at least — got a smaller, slightly more nasal sound than is typical of the larger horn. Though he would play a regular cornet off and on throughout his career, Cherry remained most closely identified with the pocket instrument. Cherry stayed with Coleman through the early ’60s, playing on the first seven (and most influential) of the saxophonist’s albums. In 1960, he recorded The Avant-Garde with John Coltrane. After leaving Coleman’s band, Cherry played with Steve Lacy, Sonny Rollins, Archie Shepp, and Albert Ayler. In 1963-4, Cherry co-led the New York Contemporary Five with Shepp and John Tchicai. With Gato Barbieri, Cherry led a band in Europe from 1964-6, recording two of his most highly regarded albums, Complete Communion and Symphony for Improvisers. Cherry taught at Dartmouth College in 1970, and recorded with the Jazz Composer’s Orchestra in 1973. He lived in Sweden for four years; he used the country as a base for his travels around Europe and the Middle East. Cherry became increasingly interested in other, mostly non-Western styles of music. In the late ’70s and early ’80s, he performed and recorded with Codona, a cooperative group with percussionist Nana Vasconcelos and multi-instrumentalist Collin Walcott. Codona’s music was a pastiche of African, Asian, and other indigenous musics. Concurrently, Cherry joined with ex-Coleman associates Charlie Haden, Ed Blackwell, and Dewey Redman to form Old and New Dreams, a band dedicated to playing the compositions of their former employer. After the dissolution of Codona, Cherry formed Nu with Vasconcelos and saxophonist Carlos Ward. In 1988, he made Art Deco, a more traditional album of acoustic jazz, with Haden, Billy Higgins, and saxophonist James Clay. Until his death in 1995, Cherry would continue to combine disparate musical genres; his interest in world music never abated. Cherry learned to play and compose for wood flutes, tambura, gamelan, and various other non-Western instruments. Elements of these musics inevitably found their way into his later compositions and performances, as on 1990’s Multi Kulti, a characteristic celebration of musical diversity. As a live performer, Cherry was notoriously uneven. It was not unheard of for him to arrive very late for gigs, and his technique — never great to begin with — showed on occasion a considerable, perhaps inexcusable decline. In his last years, especially, Cherry seemed less self-possessed as a musician. Yet, his musical legacy is one of such influence that his personal failings fade in relative significance.
 

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Discussion Starter #246
My top voters (52-week span 283-334)


  1. @Number19 – 10 + 2 + 12 + 6 + 12 + 5 + 8 + 1 + 8 + 5 + 3 + 8 + 3 + 3 + 12 + 6 + 7 + 10 + 4 + 7 + 4 + 5 = 131
  2. @AdeyC – 12 + 4 + 10 + 10 + 12 + 6 + 2 + 7 + 2 + 8 + 5 + 3 + 7 + 7 + 3 + 10 + 8 + 12 = 128
  3. @aerosmash – 4 + 7 + 12 + 4 + 12 + 5 + 7 + 10 + 8 + 5 + 5 + 10 + 5 + 7 + 4 + 8 + 12 = 125
  4. @Matmagix – 5 + 3 + 12 + 8 + 7 + 3 + 8 + 8 + 7 + 4 + 7 + 6 + 4 + 12 + 1 + 3 + 7 = 105
  5. @The Crow – 5 + 12 + 10 + 3 + 4 + 2 + 6 + 4 + 4 + 2 + 5 + 6 + 7 + 6 + 6 + 5 + 5 + 10 + 4 = 104
  6. Mauriac – 6 + 10 + 8 + 4 + 1 + 10 + 5 + 10 + 2 + 12 + 1 + 4 + 5 + 1 + 7 + 2 + 7 + 4 = 97
  7. SilverPersian – 2 + 12 + 5 + 10 + 10 + 1 + 5 + 10 + 10 + 12 + 6 + 2 + 3 + 8 = 96
  8. histery – 10 + 1 + 3 + 5 + 4 + 7 + 12 + 6 + 1 + 12 + 8 + 3 + 7 + 12 + 2 = 93
  9. Laurent Moy – 3 + 12 + 8 + 4 + 4 + 5 + 12 + 3 + 6 + 10 + 10 + 10 + 3 = 90
  10. Adam – 4 + 6 + 5 + 10 + 7 + 2 + 10 + 4 + 5 + 5 + 2 + 10 + 10 + 2 + 1 + 3 + 4 = 90
  11. Litotes – 7 + 6 + 2 + 3 + 5 + 3 + 8 + 5 + 10 + 7 + 8 + 1 + 1 + 5 + 5 + 6 + 3 = 85
  12. TennisFan102 – 5 + 2 + 8 + 1 + 5 + 1 + 6 + 7 + 1 + 5 + 7 + 3 + 4 + 4 + 6 + 5 + 5 = 85
  13. DropShotAce – 12 + 4 + 10 + 8 + 3 + 10 + 1 + 6 + 6 + 2 + 3 + 2 + 6 + 10 = 83
  14. Fortitude – 12 + 2 + 3 + 1 + 12 + 4 + 5 + 5 + 8 + 7 + 4 + 6 + 7 = 76
  15. Beat – 10 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 2 + 7 + 1 + 2 + 10 + 7 + 12 + 10 = 68
  16. Mustafina – 8 + 12 + 7 + 4 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 3 + 7 = 59
  17. JMG – 2 + 3 + 2 + 8 + 10 + 8 + 1 + 4 + 10 + 4 + 4 + 3 = 59
  18. Lord Choc Ice – 7 + 6 + 12 + 3 + 10 + 6 + 7 = 51
  19. Perun – 3 + 10 + 3 + 8 + 7 + 4 + 4 + 1 + 1 + 8 + 1 = 50
  20. Shvedbarilescu – 3 + 1 + 10 + 7 + 10 + 3 + 2 + 4 + 1 + 6 = 47
  21. Silent Bird – 6 + 6 + 1 + 7 + 10 + 7 + 8 + 2 = 47
  22. Boreas – 7 + 5 + 4 + 8 + 6 + 8 + 5 + 12 = 45
  23. wayitis – 8 + 3 + 12 + 10 + 10 = 43
  24. Sam L – 10 + 6 + 12 + 3 + 2 + 8 = 41
  25. Random Run – 7 + 4 + 6 + 8 + 7 + 6 + 3 = 41
  26. Sammo – 6 + 2 + 7 + 12 + 4 + 2 + 7 = 40
  27. zvonarevarulz – 10 + 4 + 12 + 8 + 4 = 38
  28. comfortably numb – 12 + 12 + 10 = 34
  29. Poldo – 6 + 5 + 10 + 12 = 33
  30. Leif – 12 + 8 + 2 + 6 = 28
  31. skinnylegend – 10 + 12 + 3 = 25
  32. DuaZeepa – 7 + 12 + 1 + 5 = 25
  33. MrPeanutButter – 8 + 1 + 1 + 8 + 7 = 25
  34. resident_bizarre – 6 + 3 + 8 + 1 + 5 + 1 = 24
  35. Javi – 6 + 4 + 7 + 7 = 24
  36. Utautai – 6 + 4 + 3 + 2 + 3 + 5 = 23
  37. Northstar – 12 + 8 = 20
  38. TIEFSEE – 2 + 12 + 3 + 3 = 20
  39. stromatolite – 5 + 5 + 10 = 20
  40. Hugues – 7 + 12 = 19
  41. bud887 – 3 + 5 + 8 = 16
  42. Pierre. - 4 + 4 + 4 + 3 = 15
  43. ArturJFC – 8 + 4 + 2 = 14
  44. danyal123 – 5 + 3 + 5 + 1 = 14
  45. ChainedX – 1 + 12 = 13
  46. Queen Vika – 6 + 7 = 13
  47. Wozzy! - 6 + 7 = 13
  48. Potapovian – 10 + 1 = 11
  49. James – 10
  50. Hanan Ubis – 10
  51. N.M. - 7 + 3 = 10
  52. Marucic - 1 + 2 + 6 = 9
  53. Rob & Stephen – 7
  54. Vercingetorix – 5
  55. Randy – 5
  56. SoBizarre – 1 + 4 = 5
  57. Latvian – 4
  58. salmon pants. – 3
  59. Haleptard – 1 + 1 = 2

    Some surprises here. @Number19 you are my voter no. 1 thanks to early editions.
    Adey, I know you were in love with my mainstream choices. Also, you gave 12 points to Seya, so you really are into a lot of stuff. Thanks. 🍀
    RJ, as always, your top points went to my YTB recommendations. You are the third person I gave most of my points to, so it's interesting that we have something in common.
    I need to bitch out because Matt was only fourth here, lol. :p
    Joris, we all know that you liked a lot my goth and rock entries. :) There were points for my indie and pop entries as well, which is fine.

    Thank you all and Adey, I hope you are feeling good and you did an amazing job so far!
 
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