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agradecería con alegría que me comierais la ñocla.
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I don't know if I or someone already created such a thread but if that's not the case, here it is :)

I will use this first post to announce the death of Ana María Estalella Manso, who was a member of the first Spanish Fed Cup team and played way into the senior category.

She was born in Cuba but came to Spain at a pretty young age and made tennis her life from that point on. Even though she never excelled at the Slams she won a few international titles, albeit not big ones, like the female version of the Conde de Godó trophy and she along Pilar Barril, Alicia Guri and Carmen Hernández Coronado paved the way for the next generation of Carmen Perea and Victoria Valdobinos until ASV and Conchita came into the spotlight.

Rest in peace :hug:





Here's an article in Spanish about her passing

Tenis: Fallece la pionera Ana María Estalella - MARCA.com
 

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I don't know if I or someone already created such a thread but if that's not the case, here it is :)
Thank you Sonfo:worship:

Rest in peace Ana María Estalella Manso. I will add this content to our encyclopedia. I hope we can add more Spanish senoritas and senoras to this thread.
 

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agradecería con alegría que me comierais la ñocla.
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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, I plan to keep posting stuff once my pc is fixed, since I hate writing long posts on my mobile :lol:
 

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Great to see Arantxa in Australia. She played in fast4 in Adelaide in a team with Mark Phillipousis and Lleyton Hewitt. Her mixed with Mark against Bartoli and Wilander was fun and despite it being an exhibition, there were some fist pumps and Arantxa (as always) was out there to win :worship:


She also gave out the runner-up trophy to Monica Puig at the Sydney International. Jan Lehane-O'Neill was on court as well, but had no other role in the presentation :eek:


She was born in Cuba but came to Spain at a pretty young age and made tennis her life from that point on. Even though she never excelled at the Slams she won a few international titles, albeit not big ones, like the female version of the Conde de Godó trophy and she along Pilar Barril, Alicia Guri and Carmen Hernández Coronado paved the way for the next generation of Carmen Perea and Victoria Valdobinos until ASV and Conchita came into the spotlight.

Always wondered about Spanish tennis pre- Arantxa and Conchita. Perea had a long history in Fed Cup. [email protected], was tennis just not that much of a focus in Spain until the arrival of the Sanchez family or were there some very handy players that just didn't get much recognition (like Ana María Estalella Manso and others you've mentioned).
 

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agradecería con alegría que me comierais la ñocla.
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Let's just say that whenever Spain didn't have the Lilis, Arantxas, Conchitas and the like there always was a legion of second-class players who didn't have the resources to travel a lot and, therefore, hardly ever competed abroad. Some of them, like Pilar Barril and Carmen Mandarino (50es to 60es) played RG and WB quite a few times. Barril, in fact, lost a three setter quaterfinal in 1959 or 1960. Those two players also won quite a few international titles even though most of them were of second tier if we compared them with today's ones.

In the 70es there were Carmen Perea and Victoria Baldovinos, who won one or two rounds here and there and the French Open, but they seldom played abroad. If I had to do a relative comparison I'd say that Pilar Barril would've been a top 20 player, Carmen Mandarino top 30-50 and Perea, Estalella and Baldovinos would've been top 50-100 players.

All in all I'd say there always was that second group of players. Even Lili Álvarez was joined by Bella Pons and some others at the Grand Slams (Bella Pons would've been in the class of the Pereas and the like). Those players didn't receive much in terms of money or resources to be able to travel and play. To be fair, Lili Álvarez came from a wealthy family and so did many of the players who achieved success abroad, whereas Carmen Perea was not exactly rich. In fact, I think the girls had to pay for their own trips to South Africa the year the Fed Cup was held there.

I'm not saying that many of those girls would've benefitted from some sort of scholarship. Maybe they were just not good enough to play at the highest level or maybe Spain has lost a lot of champions throughout the years.
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I'm starting a compilation of Spanish female players based on the info I've got from this subforum and some other websites. I'll keep this thread active somehow ;)
 

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What a great thread so far. Finding out Spain didn't play Fed Cup until 1972 was eye opening-and even then Estalella had to really lobby for it!
Question for you Sonfo: Is Manso in Ana-Maria Estalella-Manso sort of like Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario, or was she married?

I found this piece about Carmen Perea: Entrevista a Carmen Perea, leyenda del tenis español.
 

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agradecería con alegría que me comierais la ñocla.
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Discussion Starter #9
What a great thread so far. Finding out Spain didn't play Fed Cup until 1972 was eye opening-and even then Estalella had to really lobby for it!
Question for you Sonfo: Is Manso in Ana-Maria Estalella-Manso sort of like Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario, or was she married?

I found this piece about Carmen Perea: Entrevista a Carmen Perea, leyenda del tenis español.
Spanish (and I believe this happens in most Latin American countries aswell) people usually tend to add her parents' surnames after their first names. Normally the father's goes first, but in Spain they can change the order. Manso would have been Ana Maria's mother surname ;)
 

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Let's just say that whenever Spain didn't have the Lilis, Arantxas, Conchitas and the like there always was a legion of second-class players who didn't have the resources to travel a lot and, therefore, hardly ever competed abroad. Some of them, like Pilar Barril and Carmen Mandarino (50es to 60es) played RG and WB quite a few times. Barril, in fact, lost a three setter quaterfinal in 1959 or 1960. Those two players also won quite a few international titles even though most of them were of second tier if we compared them with today's ones.

In the 70es there were Carmen Perea and Victoria Baldovinos, who won one or two rounds here and there and the French Open, but they seldom played abroad. If I had to do a relative comparison I'd say that Pilar Barril would've been a top 20 player, Carmen Mandarino top 30-50 and Perea, Estalella and Baldovinos would've been top 50-100 players.

All in all I'd say there always was that second group of players. Even Lili Álvarez was joined by Bella Pons and some others at the Grand Slams (Bella Pons would've been in the class of the Pereas and the like). Those players didn't receive much in terms of money or resources to be able to travel and play. To be fair, Lili Álvarez came from a wealthy family and so did many of the players who achieved success abroad, whereas Carmen Perea was not exactly rich. In fact, I think the girls had to pay for their own trips to South Africa the year the Fed Cup was held there.

I'm not saying that many of those girls would've benefitted from some sort of scholarship. Maybe they were just not good enough to play at the highest level or maybe Spain has lost a lot of champions throughout the years.
---
I'm starting a compilation of Spanish female players based on the info I've got from this subforum and some other websites. I'll keep this thread active somehow ;)

So interesting to read about their 2nd tier players over the years, thanks [email protected] I think Spain probably lost a couple of champions throughout the years.


Do you know anything about Marie-Jose Llorca? I just remember she was good enough to beat Anne Minter in Fed Cup in Canada (being the no. 2 player behind a 15 year old Arantxa!) but can't seem to find any WTA info about her? Just a local player maybe?




 

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agradecería con alegría que me comierais la ñocla.
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Discussion Starter #11
Maria José made it to the top 200, won a few 10K, made it to the final of a 25k and got a few wins at the WTA level (twice, I believe). She tried to make it to the top level by playing WTA qualies in 1988 but never succeeded. In 1990 she returned to the top 250 and the same thing happened when she tried to play better tournaments. I guess her victory over Minter was just a matter of the Australian player having a bad day. Maria José also beat Basuki in 1986 though she was quite young.

Maria José played a full schedule for some years, so I don't think it was a matter of lack of financial resources. I guess she just wasn't good enough.
 
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