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I read a statistic recently that the legal profession has the highest level of attrition (people leaving to do other things) because of unhappiness of any profession in the United States. I don't know if it applies to other countries.

If this is true, why did you choose to become a lawyer?
 

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hi:). I'm a lawyer, and I live in Israel. our Justice system, like the American one, derives from the british system, so the roles of lawyers are quite similar (the role of a lawyer is quite different in continental Europe), and I'm pretty sure we have the same statistics of people leaving the profession.
I think there are a number of reasons for that. first and formost, it's a highly competitive and a very demanding line of work. if you are a lawyer in the private sector (law firms) you work simply crazy hours. I'm pretty sure it's worse than almost any other line of work. second, people come into this profession with all sorts of unrealistic perceptions of what being a lawyer is, based on what they see in movies and television. people watch "the practice" and think "gosh, it's so exciting". the actual work is quite different. the third reason, and this is a good thing, not a bad thing, is that sometimes people study law as a starting point for something else. a legal education is always valueble, and law school is about so much more than just law. it's about philosophy, economics, politics etc. it's a challenging and thought provoking degree, which prepares you for more than just lawyering. if you look at Washington D.C., for example (and it's the same in Israel), almost all the politicians, lobbyists, etc. started out as lawyers. so people go to law school, work as lawyers for a bit, and then move on to other things, using their legal background. it's what I'm doing:).
I enjoyed law school very much, and found the work to be interesting. it really depends a lot on the type of law you're practicing. tort law, for example is very tidious (sp?), whereas a lot of other fields of law are quite facsinating.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i-girl said:
hi:). I'm a lawyer, and I live in Israel. our Justice system, like the American one, derives from the british system, so the roles of lawyers are quite similar (the role of a lawyer is quite different in continental Europe), and I'm pretty sure we have the same statistics of people leaving the profession.
I think there are a number of reasons for that. first and formost, it's a highly competitive and a very demanding line of work. if you are a lawyer in the private sector (law firms) you work simply crazy hours. I'm pretty sure it's worse than almost any other line of work. second, people come into this profession with all sorts of unrealistic perceptions of what being a lawyer is, based on what they see in movies and television. people watch "the practice" and think "gosh, it's so exciting". the actual work is quite different. the third reason, and this is a good thing, not a bad thing, is that sometimes people study law as a starting point for something else. a legal education is always valueble, and law school is about so much more than just law. it's about philosophy, economics, politics etc. it's a challenging and thought provoking degree, which prepares you for more than just lawyering. if you look at Washington D.C., for example (and it's the same in Israel), almost all the politicians, lobbyists, etc. started out as lawyers. so people go to law school, work as lawyers for a bit, and then move on to other things, using their legal background. it's what I'm doing:).
I enjoyed law school very much, and found the work to be interesting. it really depends a lot on the type of law you're practicing. tort law, for example is very tidious (sp?), whereas a lot of other fields of law are quite facsinating.
Thanks i-girl. You pretty much confirmed what I believed.


I must say that the business about politicians and lobbyists starting as lawyers is hardly a ringing endorsement. :D ;)
 

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btf...

one of the things that has to be remembered about lawyering is that it's not the glamour call that most think, as i-girl said. i personally have not practiced as an attorney, as i double-majored in chemical engineering and political science (with an emphasis in corporate law). in the end, after passing the bar, i still pursued my first love which is the sciences. however...about people who go on to other things...i have found that my background in law is priceless even in the work that i do now. most lawyers whom i have spoken to who've made that change, say the same thing. if you were to choose a platfrom career from whence to make any changes, law (i truly believe) would be the most beneficial to you in every other career path. simply because your ability to translate, perceive, and discern is so much more keen.

a great portion of what i do now deals with an awful lot of federal agencies and a wagonload of bureaucracy. my background in law and negotiations makes my current work a whole lot more enjoyable because the foundational knowledge is there. if anything, law has been for me (even though i don't practice it)...the salt on every professional dish i've been served.
 

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I know I make my lawyers' lives hell. I make demands on them all the time and then hold up the bill or signing a contract until they take care of some messy matter I would rather not do myself. For instance, when I wanted Neely thrown out of my show because she might upstage me, I made Bellamy, my lawyer, do it, and he had to scheme and make himself look like an ass and trick Neely in front of the whole cast and play Satan, when it was me who wanted a can tied to her tail. I told that son of a bitch to get off his butt and earn his oats! He did. For what he charges me, that is what I demand but if all of Bellamy's clients are as demanding as me, he is rich but probably miserable.
 

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I am also a lawyer and what i-girl said is dead on correct.

I went to a top 25 law school and some of the graduates of my class work so many hours (12 hour weekdays plus weekends is the norm) that if they had taken a job at a local fast food restaurant and you factored in time and a half for the 10 hours beyond the 40 hour work week and then double time for the additional 10-20 hours a week, they would have been making more $$$ flipping burgers.

I left my law firm in Georgia and started over in the Entertainment Industry in Hollywood.

I make more money, work a lot fewer hours and have less than half the stress.

I actually liked the legal work when we were litigating in court but most of it is drudgery, shooting paperwork back in forth and bickering about nonsense in order to get a box of paperwork that probably is completely useless.

One thing I think most "laymen" don't understand about being a lawyer is that you always have to be right. There is no oops factor. If you're wrong you can lose your client, lose your fee, lose potential future clients (and future $$$) and ultimately if you are "wrong enough" lose your job by getting fired or dis-barred.

That's why attorneys have to be so darn evasive and shady and speak legalese and keep it all in writing; the end of your career in as close as the next jerk who walks into your office with a problem.

All of that said law school, from a purely intellectual perspective, is a great education (not necessarily a great experience at the time) and I strongly recommend it to anyone who really wants to understand what makes society tick.
 

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"I must say that the business about politicians and lobbyists starting as lawyers is hardly a ringing endorsement."

I think almost every american president started out a lawyer, how's that :) ? and I think big time politics is fascinating. don't you watch "The West Wing"? :p

"I went to a top 25 law school and some of the graduates of my class work so many hours (12 hour weekdays plus weekends is the norm) that if they had taken a job at a local fast food restaurant and you factored in time and a half for the 10 hours beyond the 40 hour work week and then double time for the additional 10-20 hours a week, they would have been making more $$$ flipping burgers."

LMAO! I see lawyers throughout the world are thinking the exact same thing. I was just telling a friend the other day that if I was working the same kind of hours I was working as a starting lawyer in, say, waitressing, I would make more money. but that's just when you start out, I think. it gets much better very quickly. the thing is, what's the use of a lot of money if you have no time for a life? that's why I'm working my way out of "law firm" lawyering. but still, I'm quite pleased I chose this line of work. it's like DD said, it's just a good way to start your career, whichever direction you're going to end up going.
 

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Law profession

Yuck. :eek:

I was a student at Hamline Law School in Minnesota and I never saw a more crooked institution in my life (except for possibly the Minnesota State Supreme Court).

Some of the faculty would show up for work in a state of inebriation and would boast of cheating students out of grades that they deserved. We had a librarian and professor who would sneak into an office in order to engage in lesbian affairs. The school appointed as dean for minority affairs a woman who was known as the state's biggest female uncle Tom.

A law degree from that school is so worthless that many of its graduates spend years looking for work as lawyers or they drop out of the profession completely. :mad:

The damnable school ought to be closed as a service to the public. :fiery:
 
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