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- You are on the board of WTA players. What can you say about the decision of the organizers of Roland Garros to postpone the tournament to the fall, which caused a powerful resonance?
- So far, nothing is clear to the end. Just yesterday, I called up at the WTA office in Florida and talked until midnight. In addition to me, the board of players includes American Sloan Stevens, Madison Keyes and Christy Ahn, British Johanna Comte, Serb Sasha Krunich and Croatian Donna Vekic. Separately, I communicate with Austrian Jürgen Meltzer from the ATP players council. We periodically correspond with each other about the decisions they make. Since many WTA and ATP tournaments are held simultaneously, questions should also be discussed together.

Tomorrow we call up a Frenchwoman, Natalie Deshey, who works with Roland Garros director Guy Forge. As far as I understand, they might have problems with tournament insurance, but this is only an assumption. The French insist on holding the tournament starting September 20, it is not possible to choose another date. However, the organizers of the US Open, which should be completed just a week before, also do not want to move yet.

In general, we on the board of players do not yet understand how the situation will be resolved. In addition, unfortunately, none of us can control many things.

- How do you feel about the recent initiative of the 371st racket of the world by Georgian Sofia Shapatava regarding the fact that the ATP and WTA should separately support financially low-ranking players?
- Of course, we want to help such players. Although not only they lose money. Nobody will pay us while we sit at home and play. Now everyone is in the same situation.
If tournaments start in June, this is one story. And if in the worst case scenario everything is postponed to next year, it’s completely different.

- After reaching the quarterfinals of the Australian Open, you have not played for some time due to injury. How is your physical condition now?
- I think that in my hip injury there is a little fault of my former trainer Sam Sumik, as well as a physical training coach. Over the course of my career, apart from my shoulder, nothing has ever hurt me. I think the training process and the schedule of participation in tournaments were incorrectly planned. A few weeks after returning from Melbourne, I defeated Belinda Bencic, the fourth racket of the world, in Dubai, but I couldn’t really play the next match against Anette Contaveit. She withdrew from tournaments in Doha and Lyon in order to prepare well for Indian Wells, but the situation with the coronavirus began to unfold there. Now I’ve already recovered and I feel much better.
Анастасия Павлюченкова: Нам никто не будет платить, пока мы сидим дома — Новости тенниса на GoTennis.ru
 

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...
- How do you feel about the recent initiative of the 371st racket of the world by Georgian Sofia Shapatava regarding the fact that the ATP and WTA should separately support financially low-ranking players?
- Of course, we want to help such players. Although not only they lose money. Nobody will pay us while we sit at home and play. Now everyone is in the same situation.
If tournaments start in June, this is one story. And if in the worst case scenario everything is postponed to next year, it’s completely different.
...
Although she is correct that nobody will be paid while they sit at home, she's being disingenuous in the extreme, and hypocritical because she's on the Players' Council and should be helping to represent players like Shapatava, not just paying lip service. Pavlyuchenkova has already earnt $427,166 for this season, with total career earnings of $10.2 million. At the age of 28, she literally never has to work another day in her life unless she wants to.

Shapatava, on the other hand, has picked up just $3,304 this year, and $354,725 in her career. She's three years older than the Russian, and probably has very little chance of winning anything of significance in years to come. I don't know what her alternatives are to playing tennis, but she's going to have to find something else because those earnings won't keep her for very long, even in the less-than-first world economy of Georgia.

She, and hundreds of players like her, will be the ones who simply don't come back to professional tennis when play finally resumes, because they just can't afford to re-establish themselves.
 

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Although she is correct that nobody will be paid while they sit at home, she's being disingenuous in the extreme, and hypocritical because she's on the Players' Council and should be helping to represent players like Shapatava, not just paying lip service. Pavlyuchenkova has already earnt $427,166 for this season, with total career earnings of $10.2 million. At the age of 28, she literally never has to work another day in her life unless she wants to.

Shapatava, on the other hand, has picked up just $3,304 this year, and $354,725 in her career. She's three years older than the Russian, and probably has very little chance of winning anything of significance in years to come. I don't know what her alternatives are to playing tennis, but she's going to have to find something else because those earnings won't keep her for very long, even in the less-than-first world economy of Georgia.

She, and hundreds of players like her, will be the ones who simply don't come back to professional tennis when play finally resumes, because they just can't afford to re-establish themselves.
It's not that simple.....because that is not at all how it works.
 

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Pavs always complains about coaches who expect professional work. She did it before with Kindlmann too...
 

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Although she is correct that nobody will be paid while they sit at home, she's being disingenuous in the extreme, and hypocritical because she's on the Players' Council and should be helping to represent players like Shapatava, not just paying lip service. Pavlyuchenkova has already earnt $427,166 for this season, with total career earnings of $10.2 million. At the age of 28, she literally never has to work another day in her life unless she wants to.

Shapatava, on the other hand, has picked up just $3,304 this year, and $354,725 in her career. She's three years older than the Russian, and probably has very little chance of winning anything of significance in years to come. I don't know what her alternatives are to playing tennis, but she's going to have to find something else because those earnings won't keep her for very long, even in the less-than-first world economy of Georgia.

She, and hundreds of players like her, will be the ones who simply don't come back to professional tennis when play finally resumes, because they just can't afford to re-establish themselves.
Pardon me but what she can do? Fundraising for players 100+ or what?
All the money coming to sport are from sponsors, sport agency, ticketing, etc... As if Shapatava and other 100+ players moaning were the only persons who are suffering this crisis. People are loosing their jobs all over the world, that's real. I'm pretty sure she can find a new job. Supermarkets and local shops always needs people.
 

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She is the boss, she could of said no to Sam. She is 28 after all.

With regard to earnings, it's not her fault that some players grind their way in the ITF tour, just like it's not our bosses' fault that we don't have CEO positions to earn the big bucks. People should also bear some responsibility in terms of saving for unforeseen circumstances. Too often I have seen some of these lower ranked players "Livin' la Vida Loca" and they expect sympathy when their earnings are diminished. Many people right now are facing financial problems, and losing jobs, some who have never even earned 1/10 of what these players earn. Tennis is an expensive sport, you are there chasing your dreams, so are millions of other people.
 

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It's not that simple.....because that is not at all how it works.
Why not? Pavluchenkova doesn't have to play tennis - she just wants to, and is good enough at it to have won more than a lifetime's worth of prize money by doing so. I'm not judging her (or any of the other multi-millionaires out there) - I'm simply stating a fact.
 

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Pardon me but what she can do? Fundraising for players 100+ or what?
Although it would be nice if some of the top players set up a fund to help those lower-ranked, I'm not for one moment expecting it to happen.

All the money coming to sport are from sponsors, sport agency, ticketing, etc... As if Shapatava and other 100+ players moaning were the only persons who are suffering this crisis. People are loosing their jobs all over the world, that's real. I'm pretty sure she can find a new job. Supermarkets and local shops always needs people.
Did you not bother reading right to the end of what I wrote?
 

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A continuous recession is called a depression. Not many everyday people are safe from an economic depression. Taking into consideration the great depression and how the world is even more interconnected now the ramifications of the loss of wealth can generally be expected tk be greater than when society experienced something similar at the beginning of the 20th century

Be it tennis player or aged care taker people are going to go hungry, lose their homes, rely on their community etc. I dont think a tennis player should necessarily get more assistance then say a labourer or butcher who has become unemployed.

As for Sumyk maybe he can join the ranks of Rasheed who is known to focus on ridiculous training methods which result in detrimental consequences to point play, technique and overall conditioning
 

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Although it would be nice if some of the top players set up a fund to help those lower-ranked, I'm not for one moment expecting it to happen.
The top payers are more likely to throw some cash at freelancers like Nick McCarvel that help the sport. That's what some players from the American sport leagues did for the employees at their arenas/stadiums.

The coronavirus will be the straw that broke the camel's back for many businesses that were barely hanging on. Many tennis players' careers will also suffer the same fate.
 

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With regard to earnings, it's not her fault that some players grind their way in the ITF tour, just like it's not our bosses' fault that we don't have CEO positions to earn the big bucks. People should also bear some responsibility in terms of saving for unforeseen circumstances. Too often I have seen some of these lower ranked players "Livin' la Vida Loca" and they expect sympathy when their earnings are diminished. Many people right now are facing financial problems, and losing jobs, some who have never even earned 1/10 of what these players earn. Tennis is an expensive sport, you are there chasing your dreams, so are millions of other people.
If we're talking about a Top 100 player, then they should have some money saved. A lot of ITF players supplement their tournament income by giving lessons or playing club matches, but that's just to break even. If they're in a country where neither of these things are possible because it's on lockdown, what are they supposed to do?
 

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The top payers are more likely to throw some cash at freelancers like Nick McCarvel that help the sport.
Do you reckon? No judgment; just curious if it's the case.

If we're talking about a Top 100 player, then they should have some money saved. A lot of ITF players supplement their tournament income by giving lessons or playing club matches, but that's just to break even. If they're in a country where neither of these things are possible because it's on lockdown, what are they supposed to do?
The economic disparity in tennis is so shameful. At the end of the day, a professional player, who is bolstering this entire industry if he or she is ranked high enough to play ITF, shouldn't be struggling to have a comfortable life. There's a ton of money in tennis. A player's value to a tournament doesn't go up or down based on how many rounds she wins. Serena winning one round means as much to the tournament if she won the entire thing. Kenin's value to the AO didn't become a multi-million dollar haul just because she won. (In fact, the tournament probably lost out on more money because she won.) These players all contribute to the same commercial eco-system so they should be supported much more holistically. So in that regard, for me, the entire tour including the players' council, should be investing in the well-being of lower ranked players.
 
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