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Discussion Starter #101
:inlove: ~ Jeanne ~ :inlove:

Her first recording of 1953, an old rengaine that she sang in L'heure éblouissante. Followed with three big classics.

 

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Discussion Starter #102
One of the few young talents who wrote and composed her own songs in the sixties, Alice Dona only covered a few standards (such as "Plus je t'embrasse"). You could see her make her debuts in Mireille's Petit Conservatoire de la Chanson, along with Françoise Hardy and other talents. Quite productive, she released nine EPs between 1963 and 1966. I can't tell much about her career of the following decades, I'm not a fan of the songs she wrote for Serge Lama. But the solo LP she released in 1970 in Canada, arranged by Jean-Claude Petit and Jean-Claude Vannier, could be interesting. Here are two excellent songs from her, "Tous les chemins mènent vers toi" and "Avec toi", released in 1965 and 1966.

 

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Discussion Starter #103
Victoire Scott's "Une fleur dans le coeur", from her 1968 first EP, was a cover of an original called "The rich life" by the Shamrocks (that I can't hear anywhere on the net). Victoire Scott, to my limited knowledge, only released three EPs at the end of the sixties and a few singles in the early 70's. The charm of her late sixties records, discreet yet appealing, mysterious yet familiar, must have been enjoyed by many dreamers of the time. I had never heard of her before I met her music on YT a little while ago.

 

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Discussion Starter #104 (Edited)
When Antoine came on the French scene by 1966, it was a breath of fresh air. Obviously influenced by Bob Dylan and the hippie movement, he brought his songs simply set to acoustic guitar and a free attitude with which a big part of his generation identified. And the winner was the song. The Beatles themselves were assimilating the folk-rock influence with Rubber Soul. That's the sound, and sense of song construction associated to a concrete way of living (buy a guitar and make yours!), that it was all about, apart from modern topics criticizing the society, and suggesting a new approach of things, more human and less mercantile. Antoine crossed the path of a young woman coming from Denmark, Karine Stigmark. He and his bandmates - Les Problèmes - offered some of their songs. She wasn't a great singer, but the few records she released in 1966 had the charm of that sound. Yes, definitely, the winner was the song.

 

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Discussion Starter #105
Germinal Tenas was a guy from Toulouse who started to make rock'n'roll with a band called Les Caïds, covering a Chris Montez song called "Rocking Blues" on their first EP in 1964. Wrote "Passe ton chemin" for Les Problèmes first EP in 1965, and once he was in Paris with his friend Christian Fechner, both youngsters barely in their twenties, managed to work as "aspiring artistic director" for Vogue (the label of Johnny Hallyday and Françoise Hardy), and looking for a French Dylan or Donovan to make some buzz, found Antoine in Marseille. Co-wrote songs for Christine Delaroche in 1966, for the two EPs Clothilde released in 1967, or psychedelic songs for a group called Chorus Reverendus on an indie label called Thermidor. Etc. Enjoyed his freedom as arranger while it lasted, but chose to work over the next two decades in the much more lucrative world of advertisements, TV series and movie soundtracks.


Speaking of Clothilde, her two EPs belong to my all time favorites of the French sixties. Promising she was, but it looks like 1967 was just one of those years overtaken by a wave of wonderful freedom.
 

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My favourite French covers include:

Original: ABBA - Honey Honey
French: Serge Mazère - On dit que je t'aime

Original: Peter & Gordon - I Go to Pieces
French: Bob Asklof - Quel Supplice

Original: The Exciters - He's Got the Power
French: Les Gams - Il A Le Truc
 

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Discussion Starter #107
Nice and welcome finds, those French guys (unknown to me). :yeah:

If I was focusing as much on male singers as I do on women, this thread could be twice as long as it is. It's making eight pages in near two months - not bad! :cheer:

Participations are welcome, though obviously the French part must be restrictive to most of you. :eek:h:

Maybe one should open another thread about originals and covers of any language. I'll probably make a break after February 7 (the thread started on December 7, that will make two months). I'll try to end, for my part, with a firework of French originals, along with a list of my favorite french womens sixties EPs. Or maybe the concept of an anthology of my favorite songs, with the challenge of keeping a different singer for each song. It could go to about 100 songs (only a list without YT vids).
 

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Discussion Starter #108 (Edited)
One of the most beautiful songs ever created for a movie, a magical moment where everything fits together and beyond: "La chanson d'Hélène" by Romy Schneider and Michel Piccoli for Claude Sautet's Les choses de la vie in 1970. Music by Philippe Sarde, lyrics by Jean-Loup Dabadie. It's been covered a lot, of course nobody could do better. Françoiz Breut's version is good (on her third LP released in 2000).


I don't know well Françoiz Breut's music but I like everything I've heard from her. She was supported by Dominique A when she started, and sang on his early hit "Le twenty-two bar" (1995). And since we mentionned Jean-Loup Dabadie (who wrote the lyrics of "Mario j'ai mal"), let's also fondly remember Françoise Dorléac with a performance shot for a French TV show in 1965.

 

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Discussion Starter #109
A (very) French version of a Cole Porter standard called "C'est magnifique". By Yolande Moreau from Les Deschiens show of the same title.

 

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Discussion Starter #110 (Edited)
"Try to remember" is a classic written by Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones, first sung by Jerry Orbach in the musical comedy The Fantasticks in 1960. The song was sung the same year by a Korean girl group making a career in the USA since the mid-fifties. There was K-Pop in the sixties after all! (*joke mode*) Welcome to the Kim Sisters! The song was covered by many (Harry Belafonte's recording from 1962 may be the most popular). A first version in french was made by Olivier Despax in 1965, pretty pleasant, but I prefer Nana Mouskouri's version (with different french lyrics) from 1967.

 

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Discussion Starter #111 (Edited)
My Top 20 favorite french-spoken EPs/singles from the sixties. Only restriction: never the same artist twice.

Number 20:



Géraldine (Polydor 27 251, 1966). That's Géraldine Gaulier's first EP. Basically for the opening song "La rivière me disait", already posted in the thread.

Number 19:



Michèle Arnaud (Pathé EG 615, 1962). For the opening song "Pourquoi mon dieu", already posted and commented in the thread.

Number 18:



Françoise Hardy (Vogue EPL 8487, 1966). Now there was a choice to make among an amazing bunch of great EPs. Ultimately, I went to that one for the song closing it, "Peut-être que je t'aime", written and composed by Françoise herself. I think it's the essence of Françoise here. Also if I had to choose one LP only, it'd be the 1966 one (featuring that song and others).


Number 17:



Laura Ulmer (Barclay 70 832, 1965). Laura Ulmer's second EP from 1965. I love every song on that one, with a soft spot for the happy and bouncy "Il revient, mon copain". Such an affecting voice! :hearts:


Number 16:



Valérie Lagrange: Ce que je suis (Philips 437.240, 1966). That's Valérie's fifth and last EP from the sixties. "Ce que je suis" was the leading track, but I even prefer the B-side opener, "Le même jour", already posted in the thread. The drive of that tune does never cease to get me.

That's it for now folks, Top 15 later! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #112 (Edited)
Number 15:



Cécile Grandin (RCA Victor 37.051, 1968). I don't even know how to start to present this one. I seriously thought about submitting "Le scaphandre blanc" or "Polyester" to the current Game 160 of BSG. But since it's here, it won't be there. Cécile Grandin is actress, painter, writer, and didn't mind to sing either, obviously, but only released one disc in her life (as far as I know). And it's all about her creativity, fantasy, imaginary, fancy. Only a piece of her world, in short. And that's why it's magic. Only four songs, and there's nothing else like it ("Moi j'aime", "Le temps des poupées"). Art = Heaven. A joy for my ears. Which tells something about the level of that Top 20. Because the five previous picks are also delightful. It's all about knowing what you like, too. And you have to keep digging what you like, because what you like is what you perceive the best. For a start, you can make of what you like, something you love.


Number 14:



Marie Laforêt Vol. IX (Festival FX 1453, 1965) Essentially because it features "Viens", already submitted in the thread. But you can hardly go wrong with so many of Marie's sixties EPs. She's a charm of her own, and not only for her handsome looks: it's a whole thing. This woman LOVES music, and also looks for something else in the music. Something very human and poetic. Something seasonal, and universal. Arthur Rimbaud once wrote about his early poetry: "c'est du printemps". And songs can be just that: du printemps. This EP also features "Julie Crèvecoeur" and "A demain my darling".


Number 13:



Catherine Ribeiro (Barclay 70.884, 1965) The most beautiful singer of the French sixties along with Valérie Lagrange. Probably grew sick of such observation, leaving soon her sixties music to go towards more ambitious stuff (and not necessarily listenable, imo), stating at the time "I don't want to become a cover girl". Obviously she wasn't a cover girl: her artistry was stunning! And as early as 1965, yes Madame! THAT voice, jeez! Here you have four songs that I would describe as "witchcraft". "La voix du vent" and three others, suggesting she might have been the French cross of Joan Baez and Nico, well, just to give a vague idea.

Oh, and... sorry, cover girl! :hearts:



Number 12:



Delphine (Decca 461.110, 1967) As far as I know this Belgian singer called Delphine Bury only released two EPs and one single. You can purchase everything eyes closed. Her cover of We The People's "In the past" on her second EP gives hope! But hope in what? Well, in the values of artistic freedom, and that despite this being just a cover. Her other tour de force is the single that followed. But we had to make a choice. This EP has "La fermeture éclair" (already commented in the thread) but also "Ne t'en va jamais". There's something in the sixties recordings and inspiration that seem to open up a sky, as if innocence could give life.


Number 11:



Zouzou (Vogue EPL 8546, 1967) Zouzou's second EP. The two she released are indispensible. But the second was even better, because it was crazier. How to describe a song like "Petit garçon"? There's a strange languor in there. You feel able to regress to a baby state and be rocked forever... but not sure it'd be to sleep. Or those dreamy sleeps only babies know about, and that adults contemplate with secret fascination.
 

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Discussion Starter #113
Number 10:



Clothilde (Vogue EPL 8528, 1967). Clothilde (real name Elisabeth Beauvais) released two EPs in 1967 and that's it. She didn't mean to have a musical career, she didn't seem to care much, she just had fun. Well, fun she shared well, as her eight songs are absolutely entertaining, charming. Mind you, it's not Brian Wilson, it's a bit more free and easy-going, but no less entertaining for that matter. I love the imaginary aspect, the literary fancy, very french, and totally disinhibited. Those were the times... "Fallait pas écraser la queue du chat" is a classic (first EP selected here), probably the best track of the bunch.

Number 9:



France Gall (Philips 437.229, 1966) France Gall's musical career has truly been amazing, with Gainsbourg (but not only) writing songs for her in the sixties, and Michel Berger writing for her in the 70's and 80's. You'll hardly find a bad song, not even that insanely catchy "Sacré Charlemagne" (that she hates). Her most unknown and interesting phase could have been what many wrongly call a "desert crossing", between 1969 and 1972... but anyway, the better for the music fans knowing what they talk about! My pick, though, remains the famous "Sucettes" (lollipops) from 1966, to which France Gall didn't understand Gainsbourg's malicious double-entendre at the time. But the sixties were far more innocent than what we are these days... and the irony of that song is that it generates talk about the joke behind an apparently "cute" song whereas it's one of Gainsbourg's most charming and elegant melodies. Musically, it sounds like a baroque minuet, very Versaillais, very French, and simply timeless. When people forget the embarrassing double-entendre, it becomes all the more wonderful, and the fun Serge took to pen it, a sacrilegious cherry on the cake that reminds of the fact himself destroyed all his paintings before he started to write songs. Other gem of that EP (not Gainsbourg) is "Quand on est ensemble". Unreal, because you keep wondering if it's ultimate gullibility or enchantment.

Number 8:



Anne Anderssen (Disc'AZ EP 1 167, 1969) The only EP Anne Anderssen released in France, at least in the sixties. "Ma manière d'aimer la vie" was already commented in this thread. Retrospectively, correct me if I'm wrong, she was among the very first women to sing that soft and breathy, along with Léonie Lousseau, Jane Birkin or Vashti Bunyan in England. If I like this EP so much, it's because she sings like my soul sister in the most bucolic scene.


Number 7:



Anne-Marie Michel (Barclay 71 032, 1966) I couldn't believe my ears when I discovered Anne-Marie Michel a few weeks (or a few months?) ago. But yes, such unknown record does exist, and there are most probably others sleeping somewhere, still waiting to be awaken. This is actually Swiss filmmaker Anne-Marie Miéville, whose companion is none other than Jean-Luc Godard! Who knew she released two wonderful EPs in 1966? The second EP has "L'arbre et la forêt", already posted in this thread. This kind of voice is incredible, dancing in the woods like colored smokes around trees (no, I don't take drugs). In french we have "La belle au bois dormant" that you call "The sleeping princess". That sounds much better in french, let's admit. Fantasy aside, there's a melody here, as windy as it sounds, a deep sense of harmony that belongs to the secrets of the forest!

Number 6:



Ria Bartok (Columbia/Pathé-Marconi ESRF 1472, 1964) Ria Bartok (real name Marie-Louise Pleiss) released 9 EPs in the sixties, I take them all, it's all super good. But if I had to keep one, it'd be the 4th, featuring "C'est l'amour" but also three other delightful tracks. There's something about Ria Bartok. Each time I listen to her, she moves me. Could it come from the sincerity that we constantly feel from the vibe of her voice? I hear a soul, here, not a voice only. That's the thing. She was one of the very best of the yéyé wave, yet remained mostly overlooked. Well, not by me!

 

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Discussion Starter #114 (Edited)
Number 5:



Pussy Cat (RCA Victor 49.019, 1968) This one's not a EP, but a single (2 songs instead of 4). The EP will be forgotten after 1969, and in 1968, the singles start to take over. It was cheaper, too. Pussy Cat (Evelyne Courtois) released four EPs in the sixties, and two singles in 1968 that could have made a full EP. In my opinion, "Dans ce monde fou" is the best track she ever wrote (with Gérard Hugé) and recorded. A truly amazing track. And though it's spelled "Dans ce monde fou" ("In this crazy world"), I'm pretty sure she says "Dans ce monde de fous" (which means the same, but sounds slightly better). There was another document on YT that disappeared, and was even better, with a dancer of the Tom Jones show introducing the song with a charming "miaow!".


Number 4:



Patricia (Columbia ESRF 1869, 1967) Patricia was a perfect singer for Michel Berger. Her second EP from 1967 is my favourite. It has "Est-ce qu'une fille peut dire je t'aime" and "La mer est paresseuse", two of her very best recordings.


Number 3:



Christie Laume (Odeon/EMI MEO 132, 1967) How could a debutante like Christie Laume record so good EPs? Her four ones released between 1966 and 1968 are miraculous. I guess she was well surrounded, working on her songs with Noël Commaret, arranger for Edith Piaf and Christie's elder brother Théo Sarapo. Still she illustrates the freedom and happiness of the sixties perfectly.


Number 2:



Marie-Blanche Vergne (Columbia C 006-10.727, 1970) That's the only single from that Top 20 that wasn't released in the sixties, but in 1970. And no wonder it reaches that place at the top, since the two songs are incredible, and the videos no less fascinating. Marie-Blanche Vergne was a fantastic performer, because, well, she was first and foremost a comedian. She was Jean-Christophe Averty's wife, too (Averty was a great TV graphist, made fabulous work for songs and TV shows). So this single is "La veuve du hibou" backed with "Ophélia". What more needs to be said. The atmosphere of "Ophelia", in particular, is hypnotizing.


and now... let's leave some suspense for my number one! Any guess?
 

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Discussion Starter #115 (Edited)
Number 1:



Sylvie Vartan (RCA Victor 87.012, 1967) That EP from 1967 succeeds in gathering, to my taste, four perfect songs, themselves part of a near-perfect LP simply called Sylvie (like most of Sylvie's LPs in the sixties). But of course, this EP is the first of my keepers for one song especially, "Deux mains", that opens the B-side here and will open the LP. Sylvie Vartan's production, especially from the sixties and part of the seventies, has never ceased to amaze me. It looks like she was taken in a hurricane of work. She remains the French queen of the sixties, when it comes to pop in the full sense of the word. This EP alone shows the diversity of her talents, on upbeat material or soft ballads. And she never took herself too seriously. "Deux minutes trente-cinq de bonheur" shows some self derisive humor. Two covers also: "Donne-moi ton amour" ("Gimme some loving") and "Moi je danse" ("Same old song").

 

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Discussion Starter #116
Bump of an old thread 😉
 

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share me some good music please
 

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also for this song if you can find, thanks in advance!

 
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