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Discussion Starter #81 (Edited)
Marian Ruxell and Francine Sarall, both Belgians, recorded an english and a french version of a song called "So much the better" and "ça m'est bien égal" in 1967 and 1968 respectively. Both on the same Belgian label, Hebra Records. Both recordings were arranged by orchestra leader Roland Thyssen (also Belgian), who released a lot of cool and groovy instrumentals in the 60's and 70's.

 

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Discussion Starter #82
Elli Medeiros is 61 today. Elli Medeiros rings a bell with the French for her 80's hit "Toi mon toit". A cool hit, but to say I prefer what she did earlier as a duet with the late Jacno (Denis Quilliard) would be an understatement. What they did in the early 80's, a kind of minimalist synth pop, was delightful. The style of Jacno (the composer) is identifiable in Lio's "Amoureux solitaires", that was already recorded as "Lonely lovers" by Stinky Toys (the first band of Elli & Jacno), but you'd hardly recognize the tune (Stinky Toys being a punk band not caring much about tunes - Elli & Jacno, in that regard, took the opposite direction). Happy Birthday Elli! :bdaycake:

 

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Discussion Starter #83
:inlove: best music ever...


Vic Laurens was the first to release the french cover, but I prefer Ria Bartok's one...
 

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Discussion Starter #84
Albinoni's Adagio wasn't from Albinoni, but Remo Giazotto. When the latter, Albinoni's biograph, released the piece in 1958, he presented it as an original piece inspired by some Albinoni's fragments, but nobody has found the manuscripts. This piece sounds timeless but it's a piece of the 20th century.

I don't know if any song was made from this piece before France Gall, but it was on her first EP, released at the end of 1963, when she was only 16. The same year, Pasolini used the Adagio to pay a sublime homage to Marilyn Monroe.

 

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Discussion Starter #85
Speaking of pieces many people think it's old or timeless... Who knows that the famous "Concerto pour une voix" was only created in 1969? Its composer, Saint Preux, even has a name that sounds secular. But the piece actually started that year the career of Saint Preux (Christian Saint-Preux Langlade) and Danielle Licari. The latter started to sing with Les Djinns, a big choral of the sixties covering many traditional songs and hits, sang for Catherine Deneuve in Les Parapluies de Cherbourg, took part of Les Fizz (check a bit more above), and had this hit that made her tour the whole world singing classical tunes.

 

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Discussion Starter #86
Anne Anderssen wrote interesting lyrics on "Concerto pour une voix", titled "Concerto pour une vie", that she recorded in 1975 when she lived in Québec. But that is only a pretext for me to say a word about one of my favourite French EPs ever. It was released in 1969, probably with a big delay, since the label number coincides with many other releases of 1967-1968. That EP, the first known of Anne Anderssen when she was living in France, was made in collaboration with Jacky Moulière (her boyfriend of the time) for the music, and Maurice Pon for the lyrics. Moulière and Pon were well known to the circle of Henri Salvador. Salvador was one of the first artists in the sixties to create an independent label for singers he supported, among them Jacky Moulière (an underrated talent, especially as composer) and Tiny Yong. As for Maurice Pon, he wrote a lot of famous songs, among them "Le loup, la biche et le chevalier" (better known as "Une chanson douce"). The collaboration with the singer Anne Anderssen and arrangers called Handy J. Harcuss and Mickey Karlsson turned to sessions of timeless, bucolic grace. Everything is enigmatic about those sessions: I know nothing about those arrangers, we can't find exactly when it was recorded and released, and we don't know what happened to Anne Anderssen (who has returned to France), either Jacky Moulière (I even read he was dead tragically, whereas to other accounts he's still alive). Also, Anne Anderssen in her singing career never recorded something as beautiful as this. Anomaly? Rarity? Well, let's simply call that a gem. This EP is: 1. Ma manière d'aimer la vie 2. Des larmes de joie 3. Une guitare est passée par là 4. J'ai planté un arbre.

 

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Discussion Starter #87
Betty O'Brien's "She'll be gone" (1961) was covered as "Il n'est plus là" by Belgian singer Héléna Lemkovitch in 1983.

 

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Discussion Starter #88
Donovan's "Young girl blues" (1967) was covered in France as "Ce samedi soir" by Zouzou (real name Danièle Ciarlet). Marianne Faithfull also covered it (with too much strings for my taste), as well as Julie Felix as "Saturday night" (but no version on YT), all the same year.


Zouzou mainly made two splendid EPs in 1966 and 1967, several songs composed by Jacques Dutronc, quite an inspired melodist in those years.

 

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Discussion Starter #89 (Edited)
During this first slam time of the year, one of the current themes of BSG is "Australian artists" (You're welcome). Australian actress and singer Trisha Noble initially performed as Patsy Ann Noble: she was a teenage pop singer in the early 1960s. In 1961, she released her biggest hit single, "Good Looking Boy", which reached the Top 10 in Melbourne and Top 20 in Sydney. By 1962, she had transferred to the United Kingdom and continued her singing career by releasing singles there. In 1963 her song "Don't you ever change your mind" will be covered by Brigitte Bardot as "ça pourrait changer", but Patsy Ann Noble will also release her french version on a French EP in 1964. Funny to observe that her voice is more "teenage" in english than french, unless it changed over one year. I personally prefer the french version. As for Brigitte, well, her style is unique, as everyone knows. On the same EP was a jazzy ballad called "A la fin de l'été" (covered by Françoise Hardy 3 years later). Most of Bardot's sixties repertoire was written and composed by Jean-Max Rivière (lyrics) and the late Gérard Bourgeois (music). As a songwriting team, Rivière & Bourgeois should be more famous in regard to the amount of so lovely songs they wrote for many artists.

 

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Discussion Starter #90
Medieval artistry. What is it? A mood? A sense of slow time passing? Longing? Some kind of purity expressed in the simplest forms? The taste of artisanal work? The love for old songs coming through the Ages? Dialogues with ghosts? A conscience of cycles?

 

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Discussion Starter #91 (Edited)
I've yet to be familiar with Teresa Brewer, but playing a few of her songs on YouTube is enough to make me aware of how great a singer she was. Purchase of an anthology highly recommended (from me to me, lol).


I'm familiar with Cilla Black on the other hand. :inlove:


To avoid any misunderstanding: the original is the Shirelles one (released in 1961), but I picked here a great live version from 1967 (r'n'b meets free jazz!). The Cilla Black version is on her first LP from 1965. The song was written by Willie Dixon, Mack David (Hal David's brother) and Burt Bacharach. Cilla Black's version is very close to the Beatles version (on their first LP from 1963), you can hear she shared the same producer and the same studios: George Martin at Abbey Road!
 

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Discussion Starter #92
If I had to elect the most beautiful French woman of the sixties (a challenge!), actress and singer Valérie Lagrange would get my vote. But she wasn't only a Beauty: she had a great voice and creative energy. In her sixties phase, she released five EPs and one LP, priceless stuff of that era. She could do everything, folk or baroque ballads, acid rock, perfect pop (my soft spot goes to her work with Francis Lai). No great covers to stick to this thread, her best was original. But she covered "La chanson de Tessa" (on her 4th EP) and that gives my link. Composed by Maurice Jaubert in 1934 for Jean Giraudoux's play Tessa (a translation and adaptation of Margaret Kennedy's The Constant Nymph), it was sung by artists as diverse as Mouloudji and Michèle Arnaud, but my favourite version is by French soprano Irène Joachim.

 

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Discussion Starter #94
Yes, in 1966 The French had their own Sonny & Cher. :eek:h:

 

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Discussion Starter #95
Koncz Zsuzsa is a Hungarian singer who started her career in the sixties. By the way, I had no idea Hungarians put their last name before their first (like the Chinese). You may say that it shouldn't be called the "last name" then, since it comes first. :silly:

The lovely Zsuzsa offered a few french versions herself, under the name Joujana (could it be how Zsuzsa is pronounced?). In 1968, "Szőke Anni balladája" became "La ville amère" ("The bitter city").

 

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Discussion Starter #96
"Buttons & bows" was a late 40's American hit written by Ray Evans and composed by Jay Livingston, released between september and november 1948 by many singers: Dinah Shore, The Dinning Sisters, Betty Garrett, Betty Rhodes... My favourite being Evelyn Knight's - the most elegant sounding to my ears. It was covered in France in 1950 by Les Soeurs Etienne, a fine French duet influenced by the American harmonies, but Yvette Giraud did better with typical French touch of the time. :)

 

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Discussion Starter #99 (Edited)
If you want to share a french spoken song, feel free to participate to BSG 160.

Let's talk a bit of Dani. Real name was Danièle Graule, and the number of Danielles in those years was impressive I must say (even Valérie Lagrange: real name was Danielle Charaudeau). To boot, "graule" is parisian slang for "shoe" and Dani's dad was selling shoes. You can't invent that! Dani released a first EP of covers in 1966, that was just nice but a far cry from her best to follow (seven EPs in 1966-1969).


Soon many talented singer songwriters will see the potential of Dani, and especially an original such as Frédéric Botton will offer some of his very best stuff to her. Just two examples:


What's especially touching in the second document is to see Charles Trenet discovering the melody and improvising counterparts (we don't hear them because it's not live, but we can see them).

Frédéric Botton was an underrated songwriter... charming, playful, poetic, productive... in the paths of Trenet or Gainsbourg. Check this gem for Marie-Blanche Vergne (one needs to get french to fully appreciate it, but with the music, the voice and the video, you already have 2/3 of its charm):

 

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Discussion Starter #100
Probably the most French of the French girl groups: Les Parisiennes. Not many covers in their repertoire, mostly made of originals written with Claude Bolling. But they covered "Puppet on a string" (Eurovision winner for Sandie Shaw in 1967). One of their delightful cards was their humor in the league of Les Frères Jacques. :eek:h:

 
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