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Discussion Starter #1
This is a musical thread.

Let's compare originals and French covers. Sometime I prefer the originals, sometime I prefer the French covers. Interesting, isn't it?


I love both here, but Evy takes it imo.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Is it possible to do better than Elvis? I think so. When it comes to some average material at least.


Kudos to Eddie Vartan (producer and Sylvie's brother) for this feat. :)

Oh, and Annick's delivery. :yeah:
 

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Discussion Starter #3

A tough one. But my preference will go to Lavern Baker for the quality of her exhilarating singing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)

Genius track. Hard to prefer the french cover here, since Delphine (Belgian) just used the original backing track to add her voice over with french lyrics! But that intro, jeez! :hearts:
 

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Discussion Starter #5

Sublime John D Loudermilk song either way, but Petula improved the original version...
 

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The original song can be heard from 20:00 to 24:30 on the first document, an original LP from 1962. It's a musical called Street of Dreams from Greek composer Manos Hadjidakis. The song, "Mother Dear" in english, was first written in 1959 for a play of Iakovos Kambanellis, who wrote the greek lyrics, but it was finally used three years later for Street of Dreams. It was sung by Lakis Pappas, and was also released as a single in Greece. Georges Moustaki, fluent in greek, wrote a french version released by Michèle Arnaud at the end of 1962. The orchestra is :inlove:

Coincidentally, Michèle Arnaud also offered the first recording of "Ma jeunesse fout le camp" (written by Guy Bontempelli) on the same EP, that Françoise Hardy will improve five years later.
 

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Discussion Starter #8

No contest here, the original by The Percells rocks better :yippee: but the French version is cool as well. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
In case you wouldn't be familiar with that tune called "the dance of the hours"... :eek:h:


The original by Italian composer Almicare Ponchielli from 1876? OK. The first pop song by Nancy Sinatra (1962)? OK. The version by Kay Barry (1963)? That's better. The French version by Catherine Alfa (1964)? Pretty nice! My favorite version swings between the last two. :)

I don't like the Maureen Evans version (in case someone would bring it up - not everyone at once! thanks :eek:h:)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Prrrrr....


Excellente version by Scarlet - I know nothing about her, but she has a foreign accent...

Hard to beat Peggy Lee... and Scarlet doesn't do "prrrrrr...."
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)

I know nothing about Les Emeraudes, they only released one EP in 1965. They also have a foreign accent... and great taste, covering The Orchids, Maxine Darren and The Shangri-Las... maybe the best French-speaking girl group that ever was.

I enjoy both tracks here, but may prefer the Emeraudes cover.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)

This obscure US track recorded and released by Joanne Engel in 1964, "I want him", is an addictive tune written and composed by Murray Wecht and John Walsh. It was covered by Michèle Torr the same year. Though both tracks sound pretty close, they offer different qualities. The US song sounds better, but the French version is more in tune (especially the instrumental part) and Michèle Torr, in the end, gives it her own stamp through an unmistakable delivery. I believe she's one of France's best singers ever, and that despite her own numerous mistakes in her musical career (subjective opinion - Torr gets my admiration nonetheless).
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Here's not a case of French cover but the opposite. Original is an instrumental called "Chariot" composed by Franck Pourcel and Paul Mauriat and arranged by Raymond Lefevre, released in 1961. Then Petula Clark, an English artist who also sings in french, recorded a french song with lyricist Jacques Plante (using the title "Chariot" as a starting point). It was a nice little hit in 1962. Then American Little Peggy March, 15 years old, made a smash hit worldwide in english during 1963.


My favorite version is Peggy March's one, still insanely catchy to this day.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)

"Anche tu" is a wonderful italian original sung by Louiselle in 1965. It was written by Carlo Rossi, composed by Marcello Marrocchi, and arranged and conducted by Ennio Morricone. It became "Toi, Chopin" for Christine Lebail at the end of the same year, with french lyrics by Ralph Bernet. The cover is very close, except for that "Polonaise" at the end of the french version echoing to Frederic Chopin. Not sure the italian original is about Chopin, unlike the french cover (the blue notes of Chopin comforting the singer's grief of love).
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
"Got a feelin'" was the B-side of the famous "Monday, Monday" by The Mamas & The Papas in 1966, written by Denny Doherty and John Phillips. It was covered in the summer by four French cousins called Les OP'4 (one of the finest French girl groups). I prefer the french cover, but may prefer the live version offered by The Mamas & The Papas themselves at the legendary Monterey Pop Festival in 1967.

 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)

"Se vuoi andare vai" was an Italian success by Tony Cucchiara in 1966. It was covered the same year by Annie Philippe in France, with the Paul Mauriat orchestra.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Ginny Arnell's "A little bit of love can hurt" (written by Teddy Randazzo, Lou Stallman and Bobby Weinstein) in 1965 became "Un petit peu d'amour" for Lucille in 1966.

 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Belgian singer Christiane Leenaerts, alias Ann Christy, was primarily singing in flemish but also made songs in various languages. For instance this superb tune from 1966. "Der letze Abend" became "Mon coeur est fou". I think this is german here (correct me if I'm wrong) and it sounds better. Her french is quite fine, though (with a charming accent).

 
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