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Former Wimbledon champion Marion Bartoli says modern players don’t feel the weight of losses the same way their predecessors do, arguing they can be ‘fake’ at times in response to setbacks.

Bartoli, 35, won the women’s singles in 2013 at the All-England Club and was runner-up in 2007.

Speaking on the The Tennis Podcast, Bartoli opened up about a wide range of topics, including her struggles with anorexia after retiring.

Bartoli contrasted her own extreme fear of failure, which she also discussed, with the way players now prefer to hold perspective on their highs and lows.

“I felt that my parents gave up so much and put so much effort into me that being a failure was not an option,” she said.

“It was almost like a little death I had to survive from and rebuild and restart.”

When asked to compare her own approach to that of the best players today, Bartoli said she didn’t want to judge, but said the advent of social media had led to players presenting a more sanitised version of themselves to the public.

Bartoli said sometimes it didn’t seem as though players had just lost a big match.

It’s hard not to think of Ash Barty’s decision to bring her baby niece into her post-match press conference, after her Australian open semi-final loss.

Barty’s move attracted a mix of reactions, some praising the World No.1 for her grounded attitude, while others felt it was an attempt to deflect attention away from the defeat.

“When I see some of the girls now and the way they react to a loss it’s like ‘did you actually really lose’ because it doesn’t seem that way when I’m seeing you,” she said.

“It’s very difficult to give lessons to someone or tell them you shouldn’t feel that way. But for me, it certainly was not an option to feel that way.

“I feel the way the new generation has been brought up, a lot more social media, a lot more ‘fake’ interaction with people, it’s more about how you can sort of fake it in a way.

“I try to step back and not judge the outside that looks a little bit fake, but I believe that if you want to win really huge things, you have to really feel a loss.

“I don’t think it’s possible to, whether you lose or you win, have the same spirit, that same feeling inside you.”





 

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So are they faking it, or do they really not care as much about loses? Sort your thoughts out, Marion

She's probably right though about players not taking loses as hard these days as they used to. Nowadays it's more about amassing wealth than about getting by
 

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Bartoli talks like she wasn't losing (and many times BADLY) week in week out on the tour. She has more opinions than legit top players. MAKE IT MAKE SENSE!
 

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she's right but i guess it debatable whether it's a good or bad thing. certainly bad for the quality of the tour IMO but then a lot of damage was done by that weight of parental expectation to players like Pierce, Dokic, Graf, Capriati, Agassi and probably Bartoli (plus countless more who never made it).
 

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“When I see some of the girls now and the way they react to a loss it’s like ‘did you actually really lose’ because it doesn’t seem that way when I’m seeing you,” she said.

“I feel the way the new generation has been brought up, a lot more social media, a lot more ‘fake’ interaction with people, it’s more about how you can sort of fake it in a way.

“I try to step back and not judge the outside that looks a little bit fake, but I believe that if you want to win really huge things, you have to really feel a loss.

“I don’t think it’s possible to, whether you lose or you win, have the same spirit, that same feeling inside you.”
I agree with Marion.
Good that she spoke open about it.
You should have a big desire to win and HATE to lose a match.

Barty always says she will get another chance and is not very sad when she loses.
I found this strange in some interviews after some tough past losses (compare it to Serena).
But also one has to say that Barty is one of the most motivated players and a big fighter.

(BTW it does not fit here to the topic, but I also find it weird that Barty in her press conferences often speaks "we" instead of "I" when she talks about herself, her game and results. I guess because this reduces the pressure on her alone, when she talks of herself as a team. Ash is alone on the court, no matter the team in the background. Weird but smart.)

Sloane on the other hand is the worst one with this :help:
She is similar in her interviews: "No worries. Make no drama. I just lost a match. And? The season is long still. Another tournament and chance will come soon!"
Sloane completely lacks the motivation and huge fire to win.
And you see her lack of desire to win on the court. Sloane is lazy and (despite being one of the fastest players and best movers) she simply does not run for some balls. And in matches she gives up very soon and gifts points, games and sets to her opponents.

Players who really fight very hard, are very motivated and hate to lose are:
Serena
Sharapova
Kenin
Andreescu
Sabalenka
Yastremska
Putintseva
Mertens
Siegemund
Gauff
Collins
Actually many Top 40 players.
Some players outside Top 40 could fight harder.
And especially some players outside of Top 100 give up too easily.

Players like Sloane take losses really too soft and lack desire and motivation to win.
Also Osaka, Garbine, Keys sometimes. But no comparison to Sloane who is the worst by far.

I agree with Marion. The younger girls focus too much on social media. A problem.
Many younger girls focus not enough on tennis, to improve there and play consistent on a high level and have not enough big desire and passion to win every point and match.
(I also look at the failed big junior talents Pervushina, Zhuk, Kulichkova, Galfi and Stollar.)

I also believe this lack of desire to win is one of the reasons for the inconsistency on WTA Tour.
 

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I agree the players present a more sanitised version of themselves as a whole. I find it perfectly understandable though. The media is ready to pounce on anything they think they can use as clickbait. The less open a player is, the more focus they can put on tennis instead of things that don't matter.

It's a pity people, including Bartoli, are unable to differentiate between showing emotion and feeling emotion. I'm sure Muguruza, Halep and Barty were gutted after their losses at the Australian Open, not to mention other players that would have expected to go deeper. A player shouldn't have to appear almost unhinged for people to understand that they are hurting.
 

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It's an odd thing to read a recap of a podcast that, essentially, posits "hey, you know that home-grown grand slam champion we have who is currently the #1 and is the first local SFist in a while, and you know how she quit the sport for a year and a half because of depression and other mental health issues? Well, here's a player who retired and THEN had a bunch of mental health issues who doesn't think the way some players approach the sport is conducive to success."

Especially when the podcast didn't call out the local player, at all, and frankly wasn't about that, at all.

Odd recap, garbage Aussie tabloid.....
 

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(BTW it does not fit here to the topic, but I also find it weird that Barty in her press conferences often speaks "we" instead of "I" when she talks about herself, her game and results. I guess because this reduces the pressure on her alone, when she talks of herself as a team. Ash is alone on the court, no matter the team in the background. Weird but smart.)
part of the reason she went to cricket. she's always said she prefers team sports/doubles. i'm sure it was a deliberate strategy from a sports psychologist.
 

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She's honest.

I, for one, don't have a definitive opinion on this. Some players are like Bartoli, others not, but it doesn't mean the others will play bad for that matter. But maybe their "coolness" can make they miss some intensity in important moments of matches, where the difference will be made. But too much intensity can also make you too tense and lack cleverness. So it really depends on the player's individual, personal mindset.

To me Marion is mostly right, or partly right at, say, 70 %.

Serena certainly is like Bartoli. The biggest champions appear to be this way too. But you can also take the other way around I think. Stay clever, stay wise, think you learn from a loss without drama. Barty's attitude after a loss doesn't keep her from being a champion. She already won a slam and will probably win others.
 

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I don't begrudge the players if they want to maintain a positive public image, many of them kids who grew up with social media. (Some of us remember the pre-Internet world which doesn't seem like long ago.) I mean, it's like she (Bartoli) wants players to become visibly upset because they lose matches? And if they are not they are being fake? That's bonkers, players deal with it in their own way. I'm confident the vast majority of players are pretty serious about their jobs. But the side deal modeling and other ad work that has to have some influence on their tennis, trying to be marketable, seeing what other players are doing or making money. Competing off-court, do you think?
 
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