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1937
Gracyn Wheeler d. Dorothy Bundy 6-4, 7-9, 8-6 (40 games), QF, Eastern Grass Court Championships, Westchester Country Club, Rye, New York, U. S.

1938
Dorothy Bundy d. Mary Whitmarsh 4-6, 12-10, 7-5 (44 games, SF, Scottish Championships, Peebles, Scotland

1940
Dorothy Bundy d. Sarah Palfrey Fabyan 11-13, 6-4, 6-3 (43 games), SF, Maidstone Invitational, East Hampton, New York, U. S.

Pauline Betz d. Dorothy Bundy 6-4, 5-7, 10-8 (40 games), SF, Southern California Sectional Championships, Los Angeles, U. S.

1941
Pauline Betz d. Dorothy Bundy 5-7, 6-4, 11-9 (42 games), FN, River Oaks Invitational, Houston, Texas, U. S.

1944
Margaret Osborne d. Louise Brough 11-13, 6-2, 6-2 (40 games), FN, Delaware State Championships, Wilmington, U. S.

1950
Doris Hart d. Louise Brough 10-12, 6-4, 7-5 (44 games), SF, London Grass Court Championships, Queen's Club

1951 (correction)
Doris Hart d. Shirley Fry 16-14, 1-6, 6-4 (47 games), FN, Palermo, Italy

1965
Nancy Richey d. Margaret Smith 6-8, 6-4, 9-7 (40 games), FN, San Juan, Puerto Rico
 

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1964
Billie Jean Moffitt d. Karen Hantze Susman 6-4, 4-6, 11-9, FN, Essex County Club Invitational, Essex County Club, Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts, U. S.
 

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1964
Margaret Smith / John Newcombe d. Justina Bricka Horwitz / Fritz Froehling 21-19, 10-12, 6-1 (69 games), QF, U. S. National Championships, Forest Hills, New York
 

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1966
Billie Jean King / Rosemary Casals d. Virginia Wade / Winnie Shaw 15-13, 7-9, 7-5 (56 games), FN, Eastern Grass Court Championships, Orange Lawn Tennis Club, South Orange, New Jersey, U. S.
 

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I have to mention the following because they must be among the most number of games in consecutive mixed doubles matches.

1966 U. S. National Indoor Championships, Longwood Covered Courts, Chestnut Hills, Massachusetts:

SF [2] Billie Jean King / Paul Sullivan d. Justina Bricka Horwitz / Robin Rowbotham 11-13, 7-5, 8-6 (50 games)
FN [2] Billie Jean King / Paul Sullivan d. [1] Mary Ann Eisel / Chauncy Steele III 11-13, 9-7, 9-7 (56 games)

That is a total of 106 games. Those 2 matches were played on consecutive days.

More amazing facts from this tournament:

(1) King played all 3 semifinals on the same day, back-to-back-to-back: women's doubles (almost 2 hours), singles, then mixed doubles. The total time on court was more than 5 hours, and she played a total of 98 games. The first match started at 2:00 pm, and the last match ended at 11:50 pm.

(2) The next day, King played all 3 finals back-to-back-to-back: singles (44 minutes), then mixed doubles (more than 3 hours), then women's doubles. The total time on court was more than 5 hours, and she played a total of 97 games.

(3) That is 195 games played over 2 consecutive days.

A few weeks later on the last day of the South African Championships, King played a total of 91 games (17 in the singles final, 20 in the women's doubles final, 32 in a mixed doubles semifinal, and 22 in the mixed doubles final). 59 of those games were in matches with Margaret Smith. King won the singles title but Smith snagged the others.
 

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1951

Havana International Championships
Havana, Cuba
Played February 1st, Round unknown

Marta Barnet d. Laura Lou Jahn 11-13, 6-3, 11-9 (53 games) (2 hours, 45 minutes)
 

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Week of September 21, 1959
Pacific Southwest Championships
Los Angeles Tennis Club

Mixed Doubles:

QF: Ann Haydon Jones / Roy Emerson d. Billie Jean Moffitt / Donald Dell 6-3, 17-19, 6-4 (55 games)

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Week of July 25, 1960
Pennsylvania Lawn Tennis Championships
Merion Cricket Club
Haverford, Pennsylvania

Women's Doubles:

2R Pam Davis / Linda George d. Billie Jean Moffitt / Barbara Browning 4-6, 12-10, 10-8 (50 games)

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Week of May 2, 1960
Southern California Sectional Championships
Los Angeles Tennis Club

Women's Doubles:

QF: Billie Jean Moffitt / Barbara Browning d. Violet Walker / Pat Cody 13-11, 12-10 (46 games)
 

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I know it falls one game short of the 40-game minimum, but I feel there ought be an honorary inclusion for Graf d. Shriver 7-6, 6-7, 7-6 at the 1985 US Open.

After the US Open adopted final set tiebreaks, the maximum number of games two women could play against each other has been restricted to 39. Had it used a long, traditional deciding set like the other three Slams did at the time, the third set score of that marathon quarter-final would have been at least 8-6, if not longer, which would have taken it to the 40-game minimum.
 

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I’ve seen clips but nothing more of this match. Was it a thriller or a long drawn out error fest?
 

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I’ve seen clips but nothing more of this match. Was it a thriller or a long drawn out error fest?
The match, or at least significant parts of it were (are?) on youtube fairly recently, as I watched it not too long ago. It's of decent quality, Graf was still young and did not have oomph on either the serve or the forehand that she would have in the upcoming years. This might have been the match where old Pammy proved to herself that winning a GS was probably not going to be in the cards, i.e., I choked some clutch volleys...again!
 

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The match, or at least significant parts of it were (are?) on youtube fairly recently, as I watched it not too long ago. It's of decent quality, Graf was still young and did not have oomph on either the serve or the forehand that she would have in the upcoming years. This might have been the match where old Pammy proved to herself that winning a GS was probably not going to be in the cards, i.e., I choked some clutch volleys...again!
Steffi was a skinny little runt at that age and was spinning or slicing her serves in. Her game in that 1985 match is far removed from the explosive quality that it acquired once she matured physically and especially after Pavel Slozil worked on her serve and her backhand.

Even with the less intimidating version of her game she was able to extend Shriver to three sets on grass at Wimbledon and then score this big win at the US Open two months later. This match must have dented Pammy's confidence quite a bit. At least with the loss to Sabatini earlier in the year at the Family Circle, Shriver would have been able to rationalise it by pointing out that it was clay, but the close loss on the asphalt of Flushing Meadow to a kid without any big weapons except for speed and guts must have been crushing.

In "Passing Shots" Pammy's comment following their three-set match at Wimbledon was, "Graf is going to be top five within a year, mark my words." I wonder if she realised at the time not only how prophetic those words would be but also that Graf would leapfrog past the ladies-in-waiting (Mandlikova, Shriver, Sukova, Garrison) to reach #3 by the end of 1986 and then do the unthinkable by dethroning Martina in 1987.
 

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Steffi was a skinny little runt at that age and was spinning or slicing her serves in. Her game in that 1985 match is far removed from the explosive quality that it acquired once she matured physically and especially after Pavel Slozil worked on her serve and her backhand.

Even with the less intimidating version of her game she was able to extend Shriver to three sets on grass at Wimbledon and then score this big win at the US Open two months later. This match must have dented Pammy's confidence quite a bit. At least with the loss to Sabatini earlier in the year at the Family Circle, Shriver would have been able to rationalise it by pointing out that it was clay, but the close loss on the asphalt of Flushing Meadow to a kid without any big weapons except for speed and guts must have been crushing.

In "Passing Shots" Pammy's comment following their three-set match at Wimbledon was, "Graf is going to be top five within a year, mark my words." I wonder if she realised at the time not only how prophetic those words would be but also that Graf would leapfrog past the ladies-in-waiting (Mandlikova, Shriver, Sukova, Garrison) to reach #3 by the end of 1986 and then do the unthinkable by dethroning Martina in 1987.
I agree with all of this, what makes your point even more interesting is that right before the U.S. Open, Pammy lost to Sabatini in straight sets on HARD COURTS! Two straight losses to a 15 year old and a 16 year old on the surface that took her to her only GS final (when she was 16 years old, as well) must have been very deflating, though perhaps she took comfort in the fact that just as her career hadn't panned out as she and others had planned after that magical run as a 16 year old, perhaps the same would be true for Graf and Sabatini...well, that turned out to be true (sort of) for Sabatini, at least.

One match that I wish had happened was Evert v. Steffi SF at RG in 1986. As happy as I was for Hana, by this point, on clay clearly Steffi was the bigger threat to Chrissie. The reason I would have loved to see this match is because Steffi's game was not at the place it would be the following year when she thrashed Chrissie multiple times. Chrissie was very up and down during the FCC final she lost to Graf and I would be interested to see how Steffi stood up to a more focused and essentially 'peak' Chrissie on clay at RG. As it was, Chrissie played two of her best matches of the year in the SF and Final (first set of the final not withstanding) and it would be fascinating to see a match between a streaking, yet, not what she was to become Steffi and Chrissie's last vintage GS performance. I tend to think Chrissie would have won, but who knows.
 

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Yeah, I remember that Sabatini loss, Pammy. Wasn't it in Mahwah and didn't you write about it to complain note that the American fans were loudly rooting for the flashy, talented and amiable Argentinian beauty instead of their compatriot, the born-on-the-4th-of-July-and-proud-to-be-American Pamela Howard of the Lutherville Shrivers? :LOL:

That American summer was pretty up-and-down for you anyway. First Chrissie dished out the "Know your place in the hierarchy, Shriver" thrashing on grass in Newport, then Kohde-Kilsch upset you to win Los Angeles, and the 15-year-old Pearl of the Pampas (RIP, Bud Collins!) then sent you packing in straight sets in Mahwah. Not to mention that ludicrous doubles 'Battle of the Sexes' Martina got you mixed up in just before the start of the Open that year.

Good point about Evert v. Graf at the 1986 FO. Mandlikova of course played a smart tactical match to save a match point and upset Graf in the quarters, but I also wonder how much of that 6-1 final set was also attributable to Graf suddenly finding herself in the heretofore unfamiliar territory of being one of the pre-tournament favourites and having to dig herself out of a hole against a dangerous opponent.

In some ways Steffi was a bit unlucky that Mandlikova, the reigning US Open champ, was ranked and seeded fifth at the French that year, thus ensuring a dangerous quarter-final match for one of the top four seeds. Helena Sukova lucked out by drawing the #4 seed, Claudia Kohde-Kilsch, in her quarter-final bracket. As it was, Kohde-Kilsch didn't even make her seeding and was upset by Mary Joe Fernandez in straight sets in the round of 16. I'm certain Graf would have liked it better if Mandlikova had been the #4 seed and Kohde-Kilsch the #5 seed instead.

In any case you make a good point about how that potential semi-final clash would have been a big test for Graf. She'd had a very good run that spring, with straight set wins over the Big 3 (Navratilova, Evert, and Mandlikova), but if she had beaten Mandlikova again in Paris, her semi-final would have been the first rematch against Evert after Graf had scored her first ever win over the American. Evert was famous for her laser-like focus and sharpness any time she played a younger opponent after having lost a match to her.

Plus, this showdown was going to happen on the slow red clay of Roland Garros on a court that Evert had ruled for over a decade. Even though Navratilova was by far the bigger challenge for Graf throughout her career, I feel that the toughest nut for Steffi to crack in that tournament would have been Chrissie. Graf had only reached one other Slam semi at that stage in her career and the pressure of being considered one of the favourites and being expected to win was entirely new. If Evert brought her A-game to the semi as she did in the second and third sets against Navratilova, a nervous Graf might have found it very difficult to get past the semis. If she had somehow managed to beat Evert I feel she'd have had a good shot at beating Navratilova in the final too, but Chris America would have been the toughest hurdle.

Didn't Mandlikova fall down and break her thumb early in the semi-final against Evert and wasn't that partly why she suffered such a heavy 6-1 6-1 loss?
 

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Yeah, I remember that Sabatini loss, Pammy. Wasn't it in Mahwah and didn't you write about it to complain note that the American fans were loudly rooting for the flashy, talented and amiable Argentinian beauty instead of their compatriot, the born-on-the-4th-of-July-and-proud-to-be-American Pamela Howard of the Lutherville Shrivers? :LOL:

That American summer was pretty up-and-down for you anyway. First Chrissie dished out the "Know your place in the hierarchy, Shriver" thrashing on grass in Newport, then Kohde-Kilsch upset you to win Los Angeles, and the 15-year-old Pearl of the Pampas (RIP, Bud Collins!) then sent you packing in straight sets in Mahwah. Not to mention that ludicrous doubles 'Battle of the Sexes' Martina got you mixed up in just before the start of the Open that year.

Good point about Evert v. Graf at the 1986 FO. Mandlikova of course played a smart tactical match to save a match point and upset Graf in the quarters, but I also wonder how much of that 6-1 final set was also attributable to Graf suddenly finding herself in the heretofore unfamiliar territory of being one of the pre-tournament favourites and having to dig herself out of a hole against a dangerous opponent.

In some ways Steffi was a bit unlucky that Mandlikova, the reigning US Open champ, was ranked and seeded fifth at the French that year, thus ensuring a dangerous quarter-final match for one of the top four seeds. Helena Sukova lucked out by drawing the #4 seed, Claudia Kohde-Kilsch, in her quarter-final bracket. As it was, Kohde-Kilsch didn't even make her seeding and was upset by Mary Joe Fernandez in straight sets in the round of 16. I'm certain Graf would have liked it better if Mandlikova had been the #4 seed and Kohde-Kilsch the #5 seed instead.

In any case you make a good point about how that potential semi-final clash would have been a big test for Graf. She'd had a very good run that spring, with straight set wins over the Big 3 (Navratilova, Evert, and Mandlikova), but if she had beaten Mandlikova again in Paris, her semi-final would have been the first rematch against Evert after Graf had scored her first ever win over the American. Evert was famous for her laser-like focus and sharpness any time she played a younger opponent after having lost a match to her.

Plus, this showdown was going to happen on the slow red clay of Roland Garros on a court that Evert had ruled for over a decade. Even though Navratilova was by far the bigger challenge for Graf throughout her career, I feel that the toughest nut for Steffi to crack in that tournament would have been Chrissie. Graf had only reached one other Slam semi at that stage in her career and the pressure of being considered one of the favourites and being expected to win was entirely new. If Evert brought her A-game to the semi as she did in the second and third sets against Navratilova, a nervous Graf might have found it very difficult to get past the semis. If she had somehow managed to beat Evert I feel she'd have had a good shot at beating Navratilova in the final too, but Chris America would have been the toughest hurdle.

Didn't Mandlikova fall down and break her thumb early in the semi-final against Evert and wasn't that partly why she suffered such a heavy 6-1 6-1 loss?
You're right, I forgot about Hana hurting her thumb, they showed it in the highlights right before the final. I have to say as a Chrissie fan at the time I was terrified about that semi vs. Hana, as she had just beaten Chrissie at the U.S. Open and the Slims Championships and seemed to have Chrissie's number (and she would then go and take her out at Wimbledon in a couple of weeks). I think Chrissie still would have won that semi, regardless as she was playing pretty good ball at that point, with both her R16 against Sabatini and her QF against Bassett helped to groove her groundies.
 

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You're right, I forgot about Hana hurting her thumb, they showed it in the highlights right before the final. I have to say as a Chrissie fan at the time I was terrified about that semi vs. Hana, as she had just beaten Chrissie at the U.S. Open and the Slims Championships and seemed to have Chrissie's number (and she would then go and take her out at Wimbledon in a couple of weeks). I think Chrissie still would have won that semi, regardless as she was playing pretty good ball at that point, with both her R16 against Sabatini and her QF against Bassett helped to groove her groundies.
No, true, I think Evert would likely still have edged out Mandlikova even if the latter hadn't hurt her thumb. I think it would have been a bit closer than 6-1 6-1 though. Hana was mentally focussed enough to play a lot better than that, as she had demonstrated in her quarter-final against Steffi. Given their respective forms in 1986, I feel Hana could have at least pushed Chris to 7-5 6-3 or even won a set off Evert in the semi.
 
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The list in Rollo's first post is fascinating if only to observe how many long matches Chanda Rubin featured in, both in singles and doubles.
 
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The list in Rollo's first post is fascinating if only to observe how many long matches Chanda Rubin featured in, both in singles and doubles.
So true, I remember in the 1990s being absolutely amazed by the fact that Rubin seemed to constantly playing these marathon matches (when she wasn't out with injury) and seemingly always at Grand Slams.
 
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