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Enemy of Art
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...what people have been saying about her. And now she may possibly be kept from playing the final, when treatment today could have helped. :mad:

Nice job, guys. :rolleyes:

http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/news?slug=ap-usopen-women&prov=ap&type=lgns

NEW YORK (AP) -- Justine Henin-Hardenne could hardly stand by the end, bending over to stretch her cramping left leg between points.

Jennifer Capriati propped a foot up on her chair at the last changeover, trying to stay fresh and make sure not to let the match keep slipping away.

They played past midnight in a thrill-a-minute match of ``Can you top this?'' filled with brilliant shotmaking and a tournament's worth of theatrics.


In the end, Henin-Hardenne emerged with the victory, reaching the U.S. Open final for the first time by outlasting Capriati 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (4) Friday night. Capriati served for the match twice, led 5-2 in the third set, and 10 times was within two points of victory.

``When I came off the court, I felt the whole world was coming down on me, and that my heart was being ripped out,'' Capriati said. ``It hurts.''

How close was it? Each player won 127 points.

``I gave everything I had. I was cramping. Serving was very hard. I did my best. I could have lost this match. I am very happy,'' Henin-Hardenne said in an on-court interview. ``It's very late. I need a good sleep.''

After leaving the court, she was given IV fluids to treat the dehydration that caused her leg muscles to tighten, and she wasn't able to attend her postmatch news conference. Lying on a table in the trainer's room, she told a pool reporter it was ``a big mistake'' not asking for medical treatment during the match.

The WTA Tour said Henin-Hardenne will be evaluated Saturday, when she's supposed to play No. 1 Kim Clijsters, who dominated a dispirited Lindsay Davenport 6-2, 6-3 in the first semifinal.

After two straight all-Williams finals, the Open will have an all-Belgian championship match.

``I'll go on the court if I'm able to compete, if I'm able to fight. I think I will be able to do it. I think I was very brave today,'' Henin-Hardenne said.

She was criticized by Clijsters after getting treatment for blisters during the semifinal of a hard-court tournament in San Diego last month, and Henin-Hardenne said that entered her mind against Capriati.

``A lot of people talked about me very badly in the last few weeks,'' Henin-Hardenne said.


No matter how eager the countrywomen are to claim a first U.S. Open title, it's hard to imagine anything approaching what Henin-Hardenne and Capriati produced.

Capriati yelled at line judges about calls from the first set to the last, and she punched the air to celebrate winners as though each one came on match point. The crowd cheered some faults by Henin-Hardenne, although the partisanship didn't approach the behavior at the French Open, when the Belgian beat Serena Williams.

When the match ended early Saturday, Henin-Hardenne dropped to the ground and covered her head, before rising to go to the net. Capriati gave her a halfhearted handshake.

``I gave it all I had. She did, too. For whatever reason, I didn't win,'' Capriati said. ``It's not the end of the world. Worse things can happen. Before, I might have been more devastated. Now, instead of looking at myself as a failure, I look it as I gave it all I had. I am only human. ...

``You can get such joy from winning, but there's also the other side of it.''

It might be tough for Capriati, a master of comebacks, to recover from this loss. She served for the match at 5-3 in each of the last two sets.

``I thought the match was almost over,'' Henin-Hardenne said.

But she broke to 5-4 in the second set on a spectacular point. She hit a short shot, and Capriati made a long run to get it, flicking up a desperation backhand lob that landed just inside the baseline. Henin-Hardenne somehow got to that, turned and hit a desperation lob of her own that also barely landed in. Switching directions to give chase with her back to the net, Capriati put her racket on the ball, but it landed out.

That was part of a six-game run that gave Henin-Hardenne the second set and a 1-0 lead in the third.

``I had the match in my hands,'' Capriati said. ``It was my match to win. I beat myself.''

She was a bit out of sorts at the outset, too, vehemently arguing a call in the third game that TV replays appeared to show was correct. ``It was this far out! This far out!'' Capriati yelled, holding her index fingers a few inches apart.

Capriati lost her serve in that game and the fifth of the match to fall behind 4-1, the second break coming on a superb forehand return winner by Henin-Hardenne. But Capriati got her first break point of the match in the ensuing game and converted it when Henin-Hardenne jerked a forehand long.

That opened a run of five straight games for Capriati to end the first set, but not without more fireworks.

With Henin-Hardenne serving and ahead 4-3 at deuce, Capriati thought one of the Belgian's shots during a long rally landed out. When the point ended with a Henin-Hardenne drop shot, Capriati kicked the ball, then pointed at her eyes as she stomped toward the line judge. On the very next point -- which could have given the Belgian a 5-3 edge -- Henin-Hardenne sent a forehand near the baseline and, when there was no ``Out'' call, Capriati spun around, dropped her racket, and put her hands on her head. Then she waved her arms and screamed at the line judge.

During Capriati's display, the chair umpire overruled, saying the ball was out. That pleased Capriati -- although a TV replay showed the ball did indeed catch the line.

By now, Capriati was marking almost each point she won by gritting her teeth and pumping her fist in the direction of the guest box, where her father, brother and ``Friends'' star Matthew Perry were sitting.

Henin-Hardenne's celebrations were more muted, but she also looked to her box for encouragement, and threw uppercuts after the best of points.

In what amounted to an appetizer before the gourmet meal, Clijsters broke Davenport's serve four times in the first set alone and six times overall, all the while playing fantastic defensive tennis.

It helped that 1998 Open champion Davenport -- who slumped in her chair after the first set -- made 35 unforced errors, 19 more than Clijsters.

Clijsters drew yells of ``oooh'' from the fans when she would stretch out to reach a ball, extending her legs in opposite directions along the baseline the way Mary Lou Retton might. Perhaps Clijsters inherited the skill -- her mother was a gymnast.

``The splits? Against Lindsay I had to use them a lot,'' Clijsters said. ``They help sometimes, not all the time.''

It was the first time since 1999 that Davenport lost at the Open to someone other than Serena or Venus Williams. Davenport, seeded No. 3, must have figured this would be a fantastic chance to win a fourth Grand Slam title, with both sisters out injured.

Henin-Hardenne and Clijsters, of course, are aware of that opportunity, too.
 

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It's sad, Justine has come to do things because of what other players / people say of her.
I want to ask a question to all Kim fans and anti-Justine who watched that match between Justine and Kim at San Diego : Do you really think Justine took that time out in order to cheat, and annoying Kim (no matter what Kim said after) ? I personnaly didn't have that opinion when I watched the match
 

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Kim :rolleyes:

Kim is nice. I like her. but guess what? she does everything she can to SUCK UP! I mean puhleez the girls goes and SQUEEGEES. :rolleyes:

Also what she has said about JUSTINE is just LIES. the facts don't back up her quotes about justine always taking timeouts. Kim in fact has taken timeout before on Juju and another time Kim won because JUSTINE RETIRED.

But justine has had the last laugh by showing the world how much fight she has and how determined she was to prove her integrity. Even if it costs her the finals. :D
 

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Enemy of Art
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, I didn't mean to turn this back into a Justine-versus-Kim thing. That's the last thing we need. We should be celebrating the Justine vs. Kim final. :)

What I mean is...everyone takes time-outs. Sometimes they are needed, sometimes they are acts of gamesmanship. Justine isn't even close to being the only one to have done this. Not even close.

And that she was berated by players, journalists, and posters here until she felt that she couldn't take a fair time out...that really sucks.

Like I've been saying the whole time...Justine had a moment of questionable judgment during the Roland Garros final. Like Jenn did tonight when she forced overrules. Like every player does. There is no reason to turn her into the bad guy of the Tour, because tonight it affected her health. And that's just seriously not cool.
 

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I was thinking Henin may be holding back from calling the trainer during the match also. It's sad and all the players(Henin included) should be embarassed that they make each other feel like they can't call the trainer because someone will suspect them. Henin should have ridden the horse that got her to this point which is calling the trainer when she feels like it. Don't change now. It is good to see that she is sensitive now to some of the other players comments, but she shouldn't have let them affect her decision. Keep ya head up Juju. You are earning my respect again. :worship:
 

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Hurley said:
Well, I didn't mean to turn this back into a Justine-versus-Kim thing. That's the last thing we need. We should be celebrating the Justine vs. Kim final.

What I mean is...everyone takes time-outs. Sometimes they are needed, sometimes they are acts of gamesmanship. Justine isn't even close to being the only one to have done this. Not even close.

And that she was berated by players, journalists, and posters here until she felt that she couldn't take a fair time out...that really sucks.

Like I've been saying the whole time...Justine had a moment of questionable judgment during the Roland Garros final. Like Jenn did tonight when she forced overrules. Like every player does. There is no reason to turn her into the bad guy of the Tour, because tonight it affected her health. And that's just seriously not cool.
No offense Hurley, but I think it's too much credit for this board to think that Justine's decision not to call the trainer was in anyway influenced by what was posted here :).

It might have been because of the journalists and other players perhaps, but not because of "us".

(just for the record: I never posted anything about any incident ;) :angel: )

That being said, of course it's sad that Justine was influenced by what the media/the others say about her.
However, I think a lot a players have moments in their matches where they experience something similar (be it about time outs/questioning calls/choking/...). After all, tennis is also a mental game, and players are only human, they can't always block out the outside world. They do know what is being said about them, and they do care. But I'm sure she learned from this, and next time she will call the trainer, no matter what.
 

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Well she shouldn't have let others comments affect her during her match. If she wanted the trainer she should have asked for it. She said it there people said bad stuff about her, so what if she called the trainer and someone said something, just add it to the pile. Its all been said before. If i was her i would have called for the trainer.
 

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That's sad she would have to do that. She took the risk. She's a brave girl.
 

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catkey94 said:
It is a shame that she felt like she couldn't call a trainer just because of the petty comments of some people.
Does this remnd you of Wimbeldon when Venus played on becoz she feared what the public might say if she pulled out. Maybe it is time these players started respecting each other.
Kim should not take the title if Justine does not play. Can they share it anyway?
 

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Kimumwe said:
Does this remnd you of Wimbeldon when Venus played on becoz she feared what the public might say if she pulled out. Maybe it is time these players started respecting each other.
Kim should not take the title if Justine does not play. Can they share it anyway?

This is exactly what I am thinking--I bet there was no sympathy for Venus then . :rolleyes: Meanwhile GO Kim!!!
 

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Please! She's a grown-ass woman! She shouldn't let things influence her like that. Anyway, I think the reason she didn't ask for treatment is that the cramps only affected her serve[/b]. She said she was fine during points, so there was no real need for treatment.

And :rolleyes: :rolleyes: to people saying it might prevent her from playing the final. You all learned overdramatization from the queen of it - Justine. Let's not forget Sampras' 1992 semifinal where he was dehydrated and on an IV and came out for the final. Or Sampras' 1996 quarterfinal where he was vomiting and came back to play 2 more matches.
 

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She didnt necessarily not call the trainer bc of what people were saying. The article wants to make it seem like that, of course they'd like to have a more juicy story. Maybe she just thought it wouldnt be necessary, and she could continue, but later looked back and regretted the decision.
Anyway even if she was affected by the comments she should have still called the trainer. When given a choice between their health and people saying bad things of course any player will choose their health. Thats why i doubt it influenced her decision. They should just accept that people will say bad things no matter what and do whatever is best.
 

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Justine is the classiest player I know, and I'm not even a fan. But she's definitly drawing me in. Go Justine Whoop Kim in the final!!
 

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Hurley said:
Lying on a table in the trainer's room, she told a pool reporter it was ``a big mistake'' not asking for medical treatment during the match.
...

``A lot of people talked about me very badly in the last few weeks,'' Henin-Hardenne said. [/b]
I am getting so tired of Justine's "Poor-little-me-against-the-rest-of-the world-that-is-so-mean-to-me" routine. Especially because she tends to feel victimized by comments she has made herself about other players (like faking the injury thing). She talks so much smack about just about everybody else, but then goes "boo-hoo. I am so small" when anybody even mildy criticizes her.

I was at the match yesterday. You can't but admire her fighting spirit. That is one determined girl. But that is what she is all about, the burning desire to win. She'll play her heart out, but also hold up her hand and take questionable time outs. That makes her a champion, but she has to be able to deal with the questions that go with it.
 
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