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Discussion Starter #21
Yes I was at the Wightman Cup that year, think that match followed a disappointing Barker/Potter match (well disappointing from a British point of view), Chris won something like 7-6 6-1 or 7-6 6-2 I remember. I always felt that if Jo had won that tie-break that the second set wouldn't have been such a walkover for Chris.
I absolutely agree, the second set would have been very interesting if Jo had won the first.
Mind you the Barker v Potter match was in the 82 Cup. By the time the 1984 Wightman Cup came along poor old Sue had lost her spot in the team to Amanda Brown.
 

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I absolutely agree, the second set would have been very interesting if Jo had won the first.
Mind you the Barker v Potter match was in the 82 Cup. By the time the 1984 Wightman Cup came along poor old Sue had lost her spot in the team to Amanda Brown.
Ah must have been Hobbs and Potter that year that I am thinking of
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Ah must have been Hobbs and Potter that year that I am thinking of
Your bang on there. Everyone was gutted as Anne Hobbs collapsed against Potter. Hobbs had played so well against Evert and of course Potter had lost to Jo in the 3rd rubber.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Huber beat Jo at both Wimbledon 90 and 94 (90 7-5 4-6 6-2, 94 7-5 6-2)
I realise that now, I only remembered the 90 match and it was dissapointing. Especially since Jo played great tennis in her next grass court tournament and got to the final in Newport almost beating Sanchez Vicario.
 

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I love Jo Durie. Even now she has such a great sense of humour in the commentary booth.

I remember many years ago she was playing Mandlikova on Centre Court, Wimbledon. Was it '84?:confused: Anyway Hana had been her usual grumpy self when Jo got fed up marched up to the umpire and said 'just because she (Hana) says the ball is out doesn't mean it actually is out you know":D Hana didn't complain again for the remainder of the match. I had the match on video. I also had the match where she beat a young Steffi on the same court. Sadly the tapes disintegrated.
 

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Hi Double Fault, I can help you with those two matches you lost, if you still want them. Have a look at my tennis website link. I loved Jo Durie...... fun to watch, a great attitude, and feisty!
I just found out I will be getting soon her 1986 Wightman Cup vs Kathy Rinaldi, I cant wait to see it!
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I love Jo Durie. Even now she has such a great sense of humour in the commentary booth.

I remember many years ago she was playing Mandlikova on Centre Court, Wimbledon. Was it '84?:confused: Anyway Hana had been her usual grumpy self when Jo got fed up marched up to the umpire and said 'just because she (Hana) says the ball is out doesn't mean it actually is out you know":D Hana didn't complain again for the remainder of the match. I had the match on video. I also had the match where she beat a young Steffi on the same court. Sadly the tapes disintegrated.
I dont remember Jo saying that to the umpire in her quarter final with Mandlikova but it sounds very Durie. She was lovely and polite but could be a tiger if she felt her opponent was playing dirty tricks or being unsporting. I watched her play Fairbank at Eastbourne in 86 and I was sure that they were near to fisty cuffs.:lol::lol:Cant mind now if Fairbank was stalling or what but Jo was so ready for her. I was sad with that defeat to Mandlikova in 84 as historically she had a good record against Hana and was the only British player to beat her in this era.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Hi Double Fault, I can help you with those two matches you lost, if you still want them. Have a look at my tennis website link. I loved Jo Durie...... fun to watch, a great attitude, and feisty!
I just found out I will be getting soon her 1986 Wightman Cup vs Kathy Rinaldi, I cant wait to see it!
Rick:wavey:How are you my friend? I too will have to get in touch and get those two matches from 84. That match with Graf was a classic,although at the time I was naievely annoyed with Jo for struggling to finish her off. I hope you see the match in the Wightman Cup with Rinaldi, although it was a dead rubber if I remember. Jo had played a hard hitting match with Bonnie Gadusek the day before.
 

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Hey there IAIN, I am actually getting footage of all seven
1986 Wightman cup matches, should be arriving tomorrow.
Rinaldi starting things off vs Gomer, then she teamed up
with Gadusek in doubles to beat Gomer & Croft.

That Durie/Graf 84 Wimbledon is a doozie!
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Hey there IAIN, I am actually getting footage of all seven
1986 Wightman cup matches, should be arriving tomorrow.
Rinaldi starting things off vs Gomer, then she teamed up
with Gadusek in doubles to beat Gomer & Croft.

That Durie/Graf 84 Wimbledon is a doozie!
Rick:wavey:If you get a chance could you email me any new matches you have had in the last few months concerning any British female player of the 70s or 80s. Or indeed Lloyd and Mottram? Hey that was actually a lot closer a Wightman Cup than the score suggests and I would love to see them again. Gomer pushed Rinaldi in the first rubber and Durie and Gadusek had a really fine match the next day. As was the doubles that sealed it when Croft and Gomer lost to White and Gadusek. Have to say I was, as a patriotic 16 year old, devastated as it was the first ever whitewash at the Albert Hall, and really was the first warning sign of the cups demise. Durie was great in the Wightman Cup I felt.
 

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Warrior queen lays down arms at last - Wimbledon 1995
The Times
London, England
Friday, June 30, 1995
Simon Barnes

English institutions have a long-established tradition when it comes to dealing with people who have done them exceptional service and shown them exceptional loyalty. They treat them like rubbish.

So it was that Jo Durie, who has been playing Wimbledon since 1977, and who has probably suffered the longest series of agonies in the history of British tennis, was not granted burial with full military honours yesterday.

Any institution with a sense of occasion -- I do not even say a sense of honour -- would have put Durie on Centre Court for what looked certain to be her last hurrah. But no, she was next door on No1.

The crowd did their best to make up for the appalling manners of the All England Club, and gave her a standing ovation as she left. She had played the No4 seed, Jana Novotna, the woman who dampened the Duchess of Kent's shoulder, and had gone out of the Wimbledon women's singles competition for the last time, 6-2, 6-2.

Nothing has come easy for her and, in a way, one is pleased that all the appalling agony is over for her at last. No more dreadful cries, no more defeated head-shakes, no more of that terrible look-what-God-just-did-to-me expression.

All that anguish has been for her the breath of life for not much less than 20 years. She has a lust for conflict, a passion to perform. And if she cannot perform and win, then she has always taken what has been for her the only other possible option: perform and lose.

I am reminded of the gambler who said that winning was the most exciting thing in life. And the second most exciting thing in life was losing.

Durie has been the wobbly-man of British sport, the bottom-weighted clown that you can knock over again and again and again. Every time you do so, it bobs up again asking for more.

The word indomitable does not even begin to do her justice. A person of rare courage, she will endure anything: pain and humiliation, the surgeon's knife and year after year on the road, a life that is endless and lonely and exhausting. All so that she can get out there and perform. Yes, and suffer yet another two-set martyrdom.

She has always been a good player and might have been a great one. In the early Eighties she touched fifth in the world rankings. Tall, athletic and with a wonderful take-that-you-hound sort of forehand, she looked, from those summits, set to dominate tennis for years.

But she suffered a terrible attack of vertigo and slithered back to more comfortable regions in the mid-twenties. With a fragile knee and a temperament to match, she never knew those rarefied heights again.

But she never gave up. With an apparently endless supply of courage, she has faced physical pain and inevitable defeats with endless aplomb, screaming at the heavens and always turning out at the next possible tournament.

"I had so many game points and I didn't take them," Durie said afterwards yesterday. Have we, by chance, ever heard those words on her lips before? Well, never mind that now. "I'm glad I played, well, pretty good today," she said. And she did, better than the scoreline suggests. She missed the big points: shock-horror.

Durie has always, however, retained, even in the depths of anguish, some kind of sense of proportion, of self-deprecation. "I mean, British tennis must be in a pretty bad way, if I'm No1," she said a few years back. She has also always had a genuine quality of niceness and understanding, which is rare in any professional athlete, let alone one that works in so lonely a world as tennis.

But now, after a long life in tennis, a life that has been not so much a matter of commitment as of physical addiction, it is time for her to reassess. What to do now? She has no idea. In fact, after the match she was going through its ebb and flow with her coach, Alan Jones, still looking for ways to improve. Rather wonderful, that, in a sort of crazy way.

It is hard to know what British tennis will do without her. Why is the British women's game in such poor shape, she was asked. "We all wish we were better," she said plaintively, and disconcertingly, too. Honest as ever.

It is also hard to know what she will do without British tennis. A painful occasion yesterday? Not a bit of it. "I felt full of joy, in a way. I loved it. I enjoyed it so much. I wished it could go on forever."
 

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Durie plays her last singles at Wimbledon - Wimbledon 1995
The Times
London, England
Friday, June 30, 1995
John Goodbody and Kathryn Knight

JO DURIE played her last singles match at Wimbledon yesterday after losing an emotional second-round match to Jana Novotna of the Czech Republic.

Durie, 34, will not play in the singles tournament again on doctor's orders. She has had four operations on her knees and has been told that she may not be able to walk at 60 if she does not cut down on professional tennis.

Durie is still in both doubles competitions, and yesterday the crowd was willing Durie to one last triumph in the singles, but she lost 6-2 6-2 to Novotna, the 1993 finalist. Afterwards she hugged her coach, Alan Jones. Her mother Diana, 73, who is seriously ill with a brain tumour, admitted she "had a wee weep" as she watched her daughter on television.

Four seeds bowed out of the men's singles yesterday: Michael Chang, Stefan Edberg, Jim Courier and Andrei Medvedev.
 

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Loyal fans say farewell in style to British star
The Hamilton Spectator
Ontario, Canada
Friday, June 30, 1995
ASSOCIATED PRESS

British player Jo Durie may have lost the match, but she got a standing ovation for it.

Durie, who has a Wimbledon title to her name, once beat Steffi Graf to reach the quarter-final and gained the semifinal of both the French and U.S. Opens in 1983. She may not be the biggest name in world tennis but, after 18 years in the game and a decade as No. 1 in her country, she is a star in success-starved Britain.

That's why the six-footer received a standing ovation on Court No. 1 yesterday when she made her Wimbledon farewell. Durie lost 6-2, 6-2 to fourth-seeded Jana Novotna, but it was the loser who got the biggest cheers.

"I felt full of joy because I was so pleased that I made it to the second round on a big court," Durie said. "I loved it. I enjoyed it so much out there today, that I wish it could have gone on forever.

"I had 18 years on tour and achieved so much."

Durie, who teamed with Jeremy Bates in winning the Wimbledon mixed doubles title in 1987, eliminated Graf in the fourth round of the 1984 singles competition.

"I'm very proud of what I have achieved and can go out feeling very proud of myself."
 
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