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Discussion Starter #1
it's just so interesting to see how diverse the
French players are............

for example.......
Marion Bartoli, 2 hands both sides,
Natalie T, last serve-volleyer
Natalie D, clay is actually her "worst" surface
Mary Pierce, powerful baseliner
etc., etc.......

so i'm wondering, is there an emphasis
French coaches really concentrate on?
 

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A marlboro red and a glass of red wine at every changeover. I love it, such a civilised country.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
just for contrast,
i think Spanish players are known for their spins,
Conchita, Magui, Virginie....etc.
and Italian players are pretty much
pure clay specialists.....well almost......

and Russians currently.......
many seem to be quite good on clay interestingly,

and Astralian coaches are good at
teaching serves........

so can someone enlighten me....:)
 

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You know, niceman, I think all players that grow into professional athletes all develop their very own style, although they were taught the basics of the game by the same "school". Nowadays, if you start to play at a very young age, you are naturally taught to play a double-handed backhand, because it's easier to drive your racquet that way. But maybe, growing up, you might find it more convenient to move to a "traditional" backhand with the dominant hand only.
As for Mary Pierce, whom you mentioned among the French players, it must be said that she was born in Canada and raised, as far as tennis goes, in North America (Bollettier Academy, if I'm not mistaken), so I would say that she's a fruit of the American tennis school, although her passport doesn't say so :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
andy_c76 said:
You know, niceman, I think all players that grow into professional athletes all develop their very own style, although they were taught the basics of the game by the same "school". Nowadays, if you start to play at a very young age, you are naturally taught to play a double-handed backhand, because it's easier to drive your racquet that way. But maybe, growing up, you might find it more convenient to move to a "traditional" backhand with the dominant hand only.
As for Mary Pierce, whom you mentioned among the French players, it must be said that she was born in Canada and raised, as far as tennis goes, in North America (Bollettier Academy, if I'm not mistaken), so I would say that she's a fruit of the American tennis school, although her passport doesn't say so :)
yeah, i know........i'm Canadian u know.:)
i think some commentator said that on tv....GO MARY..:D
i think she only trained there for some time,
correct me if i'm wrong, but didnt she train at France as well?
 
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