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I've noticed that she's continually put on the list of players who historically made the top 20 in the computer rankings and the date is listed as Sept. 1985 on the WTA site. This is impossible, Rush (as she was then) was playing full-time NCAA for Trinity and played five events all year and her end of the year ranking was 176. The only year she could possibly been ranked as high as 13 is 1989 when she reached the Quarters at Wimbledon, but even then her year end ranking was 29. Does anyone have any recollection of Rush making it to number 13 or the top 20? I don't, and I was following the sport obsessively back at that time (though without the internet you couldn't stay on top of every statistic like you can today.)
 

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At the 1989 San Diego tournament, it's mentioned that she had raised her ranking to No. 36. So even her Wimbledon QF hadn't put her in the Top 20.

Can we pester the WTA to put the entire historical rankings archive online? They had a ton --probably literally-- of filing cabinets with the print-outs and hand-entries for every week (or every other week). By 2017, it should be digitized anyhow.
 

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From the 1991 Kraft WTA Media Guide.

page 179

Born 07 February 1964 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Married Stephen Magers 19 December 1986
Living in San Diego, California
Height: 5' 7" (1.70M)
Weight: 135 pds (61 k)
Plays: Righthanded
Turned Pro: 26 May 1986

3 time slam quarterfinalist: 1982 US Open; 1983 French Open, and 1989 Wimbledon.

Singles Titles: Moscow (1989); Schenectady (1988); Auckland (1987).

#1 ITF junior in 1981 and 1983. Graduated from Trinity College with a degree in Physical Education.

1989 winner of the Karen Krantczke sportsmanship award.
1990 finalist at Eastbourne.

Her tennis idol as a youth was Evonne Goolagong.
Behan playing at age 12.

Year-End Rankings:

1983: 55
1984: 81
1985: 176
1986: 74
1987: 53
1988: 41
1989: 29
1990: 35 (highest singles ranking of #22 on 12 March 1990)


1990 record:

22-19 in singles (1 final, 2 SF)
38-17 in doubles (3 titles, 1 final. 3 SF. 8 QF)
 

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So.. the guy that used to maintain the top30 career-high rankings has her CHR listed as #22. I believe this is closer to the reality, although janko and binoxal have her at CHR #13.
 

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From an interview at: Q & A With Coach: Gretchen Rush Magers - Women?s Tennis - Claremont Mudd Scripps

You have played in the U.S. Open, French Open, Wimbledon and the Olympics - what was your most memorable experience as a player?

GRM:
I don't even know if it was playing. The most memorable moment of my athletic career or feeling that I had arrived was during the 1984 Olympics during the opening ceremony. We got on the bus and were going to the L.A. Coliseum and there were all these superstar athletes there for the U.S. We were with them for hours, getting ready for the ceremony and waiting to meet President Reagan. I was thinking "really, is this really happening to me?" We had a long wait since the host nation is the last nation to enter the stadium. When we came into the stadium, the ovation of 80,000 people cheering for the U.S. team is something I will never forget.
 

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Local Colleges: Ex-pro tennis player Gretchen Magers coaching for Claremont-Mudd-Scripps

Local Colleges: Ex-pro tennis player Gretchen Magers coaching for Claremont-Mudd-Scripps

By Michelle Gardner Staff Writer
Posted: 04/02/13, 12:01 AM PDT |
0 Comments


CLAREMONT - Gretchen Magers admitted she let one of the bigger moments in her tennis career get to her. She was on centre court at Wimbledon, squaring off against Martina Navratilova, and lost in straight sets.

"I was really nervous and didn't play well. I was just overwhelmed by the whole situation," she recalled.

Magers, who played under her maiden name of Rush, competed on the WTA circuit for a decade and was ranked as high as No. 13 in the world at a time when the sport was thriving with big stars and memorable rivalries.

Magers, now 49, has fond memories of her playing days but also is enjoying her newest endeavor of directing the women's tennis program at Claremont-Mudd-Scripps,which is 19-0 (including 3-0 in the SCIAC) and is ranked second nationally and first in the West Region.

The position became available when longtime coach Maxanne Retzleff stepped down in July. Magers had been coaching at San Diego City College for four years. She was hoping to land a job at one of the four-year schools but there is little turnover in those positions.

The position, as expected, drew considerable interest. The program is nationally respected and the school boasts one of the finest facilities in the country.

Magers' experience spoke volumes.

"She was the perfect candidate," Claremont-Mudd athletic director Mike Sutton said. "She has a wealth of knowledge from having played at that level and she values education and is able to work with athletes to whom that is also important."

Magers grew up in the Pittsburgh suburb of Mt. Lebanon and was the middle of five children. Her father was a dentist and her mother a homemaker. Both valued education.

She was a four-time All-American at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. She had the opportunity to choose a higher-profile tennis program when she visited Stanford, but chose the small liberal arts school instead.

"Everyone there was No. 1 at something, the best trombone player, the best this or that," she said of Stanford. "It just didn't feel right. It seemed a little too elitest. I just didn't fit in there."

The environment at Trinity wasn't that much different than the one at Claremont, so she can identify with the athletes she now coaches.
"This was a great opportunity and the timing was perfect," she said before a match last week. "This really was a perfect fit and I'm grateful it came along when it did."

Magers, who has an 18-year-old son and 16-year-old twin daughters, chuckled when asked if her playing credentials carried any weight with her athletes, most of whom weren't born when she retired in 1992.

"I wish they were just a little impressed," she laughed.

Magers won four titles, although none was a major. She reached the quarterfinals of Wimbledon, the U.S. Open and the French Open. She singled out a round of 16 Wimbledon match against Pam Shriver, which she won 13-11 in the final set, as one of her most memorable moments.
But her biggest accomplishments came in doubles. She partnered with Kelly Jones and reached the Wimbledon mixed doubles final in 1988.
"I enjoyed it more, probably because I had more success," she said. "I also liked all the strategy and teamwork involved."

Magers continued to play on the seniors (35-over) circuit and teamed with Mima Jausovec of Yugoslavia to win Wimbledon doubles in 2002.
"It may have been 35-over, but technically I'm a Wimbledon champion," she laughed.

Magers was hired over the summer, when most players were not around but she did get to meet a few on her interview. Among those was junior Crystal Lim.

"She's very easy to talk to. I liked her right away and thought she would be fun to play for," Lim said. "It's nice to have a coach that got to that level. We might not have seen her play, but we follow the game and know what it must have taken to get there."

-------------------------------

*Overall a good article, that like many, erroneously passes on the #13 ranking snafu.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks everyone for investigating! Magers always seemed like a cool, intelligent player who didn't take herself or the game too seriously. Interesting that she did make two GS quarterfinals as an amateur but stayed in college and completed her four years.
 

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Good research Rollo.

It is clear WTA made a mistake with her ranking. No collection of data is likely to be perfect but it makes you wonder how many more mistakes may be lurking in the WTA rankings. Her WTA profile page shows a highest ranking at no. 13 on 16 Sep 1985 (which is mentioned on the English wiki) but if you look at the ranking list on that date it actually shows her ranked as no. 3 (which is mentioned on the other language wikis) which can not be correct. According to the same WTA profile her end of year ranking for 1985 was no. 176! For some reason it seems they mixed up her ranking with that of Hana Mandlikova, who is missing from the 16 Sep 1985 list but ended the year as no. 3 behind Navratilova and Evert.
 
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