Tennis Forum banner

441 - 460 of 507 Posts

·
Chionophile
Joined
·
40,073 Posts
French and Russian as second languages for me. I did some German also.

Sure, but the question is whether they'd know it was the 2nd most populous city? Without googling, I myself would probably pick Lyon or Lille :lol:
I would’ve said Marseille.
 

·
Chionophile
Joined
·
40,073 Posts
Interesting that the Icelanders learn Danish as second language. Does it have to do with proximity to Faroe Island?

No, previous political ties. I think it used to controlled by Denmark in union with Norway. I don't think Denmark is popular though (like they were seen more as overlords or that was the impression I got when I visited through some guides), I think it's more that due to those ties it was taught in school as part of policy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,029 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,898 Posts
I would have thought more people would study Russian in Latvia. I guess it doesn't include the native Russian speakers. Latvians aged 35- speak Russian much better than Estonians. In fact I know ony a few people in that age group who would actually speak Russian as well as English having studied it at school:tape::help: (myself included..)

After English and Russian comes probably German (I think it has lost some people to Russian over the years), and then French. Spanish could be more popular if there were teachers..
 

·
Honorary Admin
Joined
·
99,180 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,130 Posts
...and a part of the EU since 1995 and dependent ever since :angel:

On a serious note, it's pretty interesting that many of the famous Finland people were native Swedish speakers such as the country's best composer Sibelius, some prime ministers, etc. (A bit similar to Czechia, where quite a few elite people were native German speakers.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish-speaking_population_of_Finland
Flags are flying today to celebrate Finnish Swedish Heritage Day... :D
https://finland.fi/life-society/how-to-be-finnish-in-swedish/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,455 Posts
Here's another interesting one.

Didn't know that the Greeks were so big Germanophiles, maybe they really want to claim those WW2 reparations? :eek:h:

Also, I presume Swedish is a compulsory language in Finland's schools?

Very surprised about the popularity of Spanish in Norge and Sverige, unlike the affinity of Romanians towards French, which makes perfect sense, as does the popularity of Russian in the Baltics.

The data for Austria is wrong :smash:
I really don't get why so many people in Europe learn Spanish, I can see this trend in Poland as well. I get that a lot of people find Romance languages beautiful but from the business/employment perspective there are at least two Romance languages that are much more useful in Europe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,089 Posts
I really don't get why so many people in Europe learn Spanish, I can see this trend in Poland as well. I get that a lot of people find Romance languages beautiful but from the business/employment perspective there are at least two Romance languages that are much more useful in Europe.
Not sure about Europe, but from my side I found Spanish easier to learn compared to German and French. Also at least for traveling purposes, it is useful in Latin America, and a lot of Southern African countries had strong links with Cuba, so here we have a number of Spanish speakers. I must say however, the worst racism I have found outside my country was in Barcelona and Madrid - monkey noises and people just randomly cursing at you as if you are one of those immigrants who took a boat across the Mediterranean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,775 Posts
That graph only indicates the most popular language, but the second most popular may not be far behind.

For example, it could be "28% French / 25% German" for country A and "28% German / 25% French" for country B, which is roughly the same, but country A would be "French" and country B "German" on the graph.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,455 Posts
Not sure about Europe, but from my side I found Spanish easier to learn compared to German and French. Also at least for traveling purposes, it is useful in Latin America, and a lot of Southern African countries had strong links with Cuba, so here we have a number of Spanish speakers. I must say however, the worst racism I have found outside my country was in Barcelona and Madrid - monkey noises and people just randomly cursing at you as if you are one of those immigrants who took a boat across the Mediterranean.
I totally understand that it's a useful language in Americas, but Latin America doesn't really matter in Europe. I feel like this love for Spanish among young Europeans is based on stuff like music, TV, handsome Latinos etc. but at the end of the day, kids that choose to learn German or French will end up with much higher salaries and better job prospects.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,377 Posts
Flags are flying today to celebrate Finnish Swedish Heritage Day... :D
https://finland.fi/life-society/how-to-be-finnish-in-swedish/
That's a very interesting article, I didn't know that Finland had such a huge Swedish background and history :)

I liked this excerpt: 'Finland’s best-known composer, Jean Sibelius, was a Swedish speaker, as was Marshal C.G. Mannerheim, who led Finland through the World Wars. In addition to his mother tongue, Mannerheim spoke Russian, German, French and English – and Finnish was actually his weakest language. Note that this didn’t make him any less of a Finn.'

Anyway, happy anniversary :hatoff:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,377 Posts
I really don't get why so many people in Europe learn Spanish, I can see this trend in Poland as well. I get that a lot of people find Romance languages beautiful but from the business/employment perspective there are at least two Romance languages that are much more useful in Europe.
I would understand someone picking Spanish over Italian, as there are not many countries to use the latter outside that beautiful country in SE which seems to be in perennial crisis :eek:h:

But the popularity of Spanish in Sweden and Norway is weird, I'd expect the same pattern as in Denmark, i.e. German leading the way and then followed by French.

As for Poland, that's surprising about Spanish, but I wonder if there's some recent surge in the popularity of Russian now that the language is no longer compulsory?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,029 Posts
I would understand someone picking Spanish over Italian, as there are not many countries to use the latter outside that beautiful country in SE which seems to be in perennial crisis :eek:h:

But the popularity of Spanish in Sweden and Norway is weird, I'd expect the same pattern as in Denmark, i.e. German leading the way and then followed by French.

As for Poland, that's surprising about Spanish, but I wonder if there's some recent surge in the popularity of Russian now that the language is no longer compulsory?
Check how many people from Scandinavian countries travel to Spain for holidays and how many live there permanently. It's a pretty big number. There are whole cities in Spain consisting of majority Scandinavians that have their own language bars etc. You go to some of these places and you hear more Norwegian or Finnish than Spanish.

Looking at language courses offered by the city of Helsinki: Opinto-ohjelma

There are about 7 pages of different Spanish courses from A1 to C1 while all the other languages except English have 1-2 pages max.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
37,545 Posts
I always felt that France had more ties with Spain than Italy, Germany or England. Not by a big margin, but culturally perceptible. Could be subjective, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,775 Posts
I always felt that France had more ties with Spain than Italy, Germany or England. Not by a big margin, but culturally perceptible. Could be subjective, though.
My feeling is that the French are actually not that interested in Spain (in every sense: culture, news, tourism), despite it being a big neighbor country.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
37,545 Posts
My feeling is that the French are actually not that interested in Spain (in every sense: culture, news, tourism), despite it being a big neighbor country.
On a broader view the French may be not really interested in anything outside of France. But sentimentally and politically, there's something in common with Spain. In the last decade, French and Spanish cultures seemed to mix up more. On the surface, to the least. There must be surveys out there about which are the French favorite European countries. I would be curious to know. Wouldn't be surprised to see Spain come first from such survey.
 
441 - 460 of 507 Posts
Top