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http://instagr.am/p/B5Lm8hTAwra/
Some really interesting insight from her, including touching on depression and the complacency she sees in players today.

Here's the FULL caption from the website:

I turned pro when I was 15 and I quit when I was 25. It was 10 years of quite an experience that came to a tough end when I fractured my lower back. Even with all the hard work and lots of pressure day to day, I really enjoyed my time and I was happiest when I could wake up and just get on court. It is funny, once I quit I was really missing the adrenaline and energy that you experience from tennis. It has been very difficult to find anything that can take its place, something that truly motivates me. I am proud of what I have achieved and am not blaming anyone for my injuries, just thankful that I was able to enjoy all those years. I still do not see myself coming back on tour like Kim Clijsters or Tatiana Golovin, but I can definitely see myself coaching and sharing my experiences with another player. I see many girls today content with what they are achieving, while when I played each person wanted to be better than the one ahead of them, more than anything. It is tough to judge when you aren’t playing but this is what I see. Henin, Clijsters, Davenport, Capriati, Pierce, Mauresmo and the other Russians were all pushing the limits, always eager to be better. I feel there was a different sense of rivalry in those years. I recently finished my law degree, which was a goal of mine, but I keep finding my head wanting to get back into tennis. These 8-9 years since my career have not been the easiest. I think this happens quite often to players after they retire, they struggle with depression. One of the main reasons is because you go from playing on tour, the center of attention, to just another person. When I was number one in the world, everyone was gathering around me, wanting to just get a piece of me. Now it seems like many don’t really care. I have even tried multiple times to approach the president of our tennis federation to see if I could be a part of helping the next generation and they never contact me back. It seems like they don’t want to help you anymore. You wonder why they wouldn’t want you after all you accomplished for the country (silver medal and one in the world) and it just leaves you confused and hurt. It feels like constant reminders that they don’t need you anymore and they just don’t care. You realize you have to take care of yourself and the feeling of loneliness are not easy to deal with at all. It has only gotten better this year when I accepted everything I didn’t want to be true. I have worked to bring my happiness back and now I go up to players and agents directly telling them I am interested in being a coach. No matter what you do or accomplish, you have to be there for yourself, not relying on anyone, and that was a tough lesson to learn.
 

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Dinara had to retire with a back injury when she was still one of the best players. 3 slam finals, slam semis, silver medal won mandatories and premier 5s, excellent grinder.
I hope a player or 2 gives her a call. It cant hurt to listen to her experience as a former #1 who went deep in almost every draw
 

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Dinara had to retire with a back injury when she was still one of the best players. 3 slam finals, slam semis, silver medal won mandatories and premier 5s, excellent grinder.
I hope a player or 2 gives her a call. It cant hurt to listen to her experience as a former #1 who went deep in almost every draw
She was no longer one of the best players when she retired. The lies you tell.
 

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she says she misses tennis, but it didn't seem that she enjoyed it when i watched her play. i still remember that epic on-court meltdown she had, really didn't think tennis was good for her mentally.

but she is right on learning how to be emotionally self-reliant and i think she's right on today's players just not being as good as before.
 

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Dinara had to retire with a back injury when she was still one of the best players. 3 slam finals, slam semis, silver medal won mandatories and premier 5s, excellent grinder.
I hope a player or 2 gives her a call. It cant hurt to listen to her experience as a former #1 who went deep in almost every draw
She was no longer one of the best players when she retired. The lies you tell.
She injured herself while being one of the best players in the world.
 

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Love Safina's backhand


Anyone remember when she retired and went on that obstacle course show and fell straight onto her back getting disqualified?

Anyway, I feel for her and I can imagine the contrast of being in demand as no. 1 to not even getting a call back from your old sporting Federation can be really hurtful. Happy for her to grow and move on and we'll done to her for being so honest
 

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She was no longer one of the best players when she retired. The lies you tell.
Yeah, I think being #1, when you are virtually forced to retire qualifies as one of the best players.
 

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So Safina agrees with the idea of a weak crop of top players. I think she hit the nail on the head with 'complacency'. Although I do think the younger generation is an exciting one.

Sad to hear about her depression, but also logical in a sense. Your whole sense of purpose vanishes with an injury, and there was nothing to prepare you for it. Glad to see she's doing better, hopefully we'll see her on tour.
 

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Some interesting thoughts from Safina, it's always nice to hear the views of past players. (Well, maybe except Margaret Court :eek:h:)
 

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she says she misses tennis, but it didn't seem that she enjoyed it when i watched her play. i still remember that epic on-court meltdown she had, really didn't think tennis was good for her mentally.

but she is right on learning how to be emotionally self-reliant and i think she's right on today's players just not being as good as before.
I remember 2 of those... the one against Kvitova in USO 09, she wasted MP and was pushing like Woz in that match, obviously zero confidence and nervous mental wreck

And that disaster FO 09 F, she was the favorite but her mental pressure and nerves didnt let her play... that match should be erased from tennis
 

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she says she misses tennis, but it didn't seem that she enjoyed it when i watched her play. i still remember that epic on-court meltdown she had, really didn't think tennis was good for her mentally.

but she is right on learning how to be emotionally self-reliant and i think she's right on today's players just not being as good as before.
I don't think she was necessarily making a value judgment. As someone who just talked about her own battles with depression, she could actually be lauding the current generation for being content with tennis and not the misery of always wanting more, more, more.
 

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She would had been a late slam bloomer like the likes of Halep. Safina had a lot of game. A very heavy draining game. So much force. Rather all court game to boot. She was a hot head because she wanted it so bad. She would have stayed around the top 10 for some time.

Shame what happened to her.


Ya’ll be nice.
 

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It's interesting to see Safina commenting on the complacency of the current crop of top players because it can be argued that this is to a large degree a response to the careers of people like herself. The period of rotating slamless #1s that the WTA experienced with Safina, Jankovic and Wozniacki and the response of the general public to those players (in contrast to Serena) has warped perception of careers hugely versus the early 2000s and I think the attitudes of current players are largely a response to that at this point.

Players are content with small achievements now because the only real criteria anybody judges players on in the late teens is whether or not they won a slam in their career. Halep knows that she did enough to create a positive legacy by winning Roland Garros, and winning Wimbledon was just icing. Any other slams she wins from now on (obviously, other titles wouldn't matter) will be nice, but totally unnecessary. It's not surprising to me that she's taken her foot off the gas. Wozniacki was always going to check out after ticking that box in Melbourne. Ostapenko will be looked back on positively no matter what else happens for her now. There's no incentive for players to endlessly race for more and more at this point because a single slam makes you immune to the criticism that players learned to fear after what happened to Safina and early career Wozniacki, and in contrast, racking up additional honours beyond slams really doesn't matter too much.

I think now that we're entering an era where players like Safina being attacked is a fairly distant memory, we might see more players come through without those hangups. They will hopefully feel like they can strive for greatness, rather than just pass the "I'm a credible player because I won a slam" barrier. But when will we get our next Dementieva, or Petrova, where we can look back at a slamless player and say "They were excellent", or "They were one of the best of their generation"? Dementieva in particular would be ripped to shreds if her career was replicated in this decade. If we continue this "win a slam and then I'll consider you a credible player" obsession, it will be hard for the WTA to shake off the "just please let me win any slam and I'll be happy" attitudes.
 

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I don't understand why the president of the Russian federation wouldn't want her to provide her input to the younger generation.
 

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I remember 2 of those... the one against Kvitova in USO 09, she wasted MP and was pushing like Woz in that match, obviously zero confidence and nervous mental wreck

And that disaster FO 09 F, she was the favorite but her mental pressure and nerves didnt let her play... that match should be erased from tennis

True, I really thought this would be her slam. Same with Lena D in 2004. :(
Don't know who was the biggest mental wreck. Maybe having to play a compatriot played its part. :shrug:
 

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I don't think she was necessarily making a value judgment. As someone who just talked about her own battles with depression, she could actually be lauding the current generation for being content with tennis and not the misery of always wanting more, more, more.
That's an interesting thought.

Safina always looked miserable on court. It's probably one of the reasons why she was never really popular. Anyway, it's a little bit strange so many doors have been shut for since she achieved so much and after all, she is Marat's sister.
 

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She would had been a late slam bloomer like the likes of Halep. Safina had a lot of game. A very heavy draining game. So much force. Rather all court game to boot. She was a hot head because she wanted it so bad. She would have stayed around the top 10 for some time.

Shame what happened to her.


Ya’ll be nice.
I’m sorry I can’t :lol:

She was the definition of a power grinder, winning most of her matches by outlasting her opponent with her suspiciously good endurance.
 
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