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To the Czech users:
I have a question about Czech surnames ;)
Almost every Czech girl has the -ova ending. But some not. Why ?

I looked at the Czech players in current WTA ranking.
www.wtatennis.com/rankings

Lucie Hradecka is the only one who has no -ova as ending.
[And the foreign girls/fake Czechs Anastasia Zarycka (from Ukraine) and Anastasia Detiuc (from Moldova). But they do not count.]

All the other Czech WTA players have -ova:
Kvitova
Pliskova
Vondrousova
Strycova
Siniakova
Muchova
Bouzkova
Martincova
Smitkova
Voracova
Stefkova
Allertova
And many more ...

Then I also looked at the Czech juniors:
https://www.itftennis.com/juniors/rankings/rankings-list/players.aspx?Nation=CZE&From=0&To=-1&Name=&MatchCode=S&Gender=G&Region=&node=0

And I found some more:
Agata Cerna
Alexandra Silna
Anna Panchartek
Petra Csabi
Kristyna Kostelna
[Andrea Nova (N-ova. Not sure, but "N" seems a weird and very short surname for a man.)]

I also found some ITF players:
Karolina Novotna
Justyna Malatinska (sounds Polish, I guess she lives near to Polish border.)

Do they have foreign roots ? Or why do they have no -ova ?

Thanks for your answer.
 

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If the masculine version is a noun then they add -ova, if it's an adjective then it becomes a female adjective (Hradecka, Cerna). Hence we had Jana Novotna and not Jana Novotnova because Novotny (derived from 'Novy') is an adjective not a noun. Maybe some native Czech can confirm this.
 

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[And the foreign girls/fake Czechs Anastasia Zarycka (from Ukraine) and Anastasia Detiuc (from Moldova). But they do not count.]
Zarycka is quite correct by this logic. Zarytsky<->Zarytska. Detiuc should be as Detiucova, but I'm not sure :lol: Detiuc, probably also a Ukrainian surname, but not an adjective, so it does not transform for women, unlike the Czechs...
 

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Pretty much what was said, -ová is not used if the male form of the surname is an obvious adjective (that is a czech one, or obviou slavic one like in Zarytska case) and there is already an existing femining adjective to be used instead (for names from other slavic languages, replacing the last vowel with "á" is the usual way, usually the name already end with "a" without an accent mark anyway*). There are also surnames that have the same form in both genders, albeit those are not very common, usually ending on"ů", that is u with "kroužek" circle above (basically ú, written differently for grammatic reasons), like Janů, Janků, Jirků, Tomšů etc.. Technically the base word would be adjective as well, but unlike regualr adjectives like Černý/Černá (black), you won't see it used as one.¨
¨
There are staunch defenders of the -ová thing and opposite group who consider it archaic nonsense (putting gender arguments into it) while most people don't care. There is kind of a recent fad of taking husband's surname in its male, unaltered from, officially when marrying, which has been a legal option for some time, I guess due to global nature of contemporary world so it makes sense when you marry a foreigner, but it is used extensively by some, and frowned upon by others, especially in cases when the women opts for the male adjective form, like Kaplický. Causing both weird situation as it goes against czech declension rules and the only way to deal with it is not decline it at all, which is the way how Czechs often deal with foreign female names unless they do it officially like public tv, radios etc. who have follow the ová thing (causing odd situations when they ová the foreigners and keep the male form surnams of czech women that opt out for them, which is apparently the officially correct way to do it). But quite often you can catch a sport broadcast with the tv person using the ová altered surnames of competitors while having theior fellow anthlete (reitred, injured or otherwise not competing) as guest, who uses the foreign surnames unaltered as they are used to from contect with them during their careers :)

*Some do not, as in the case of the american swimmer Katie Ledecky, whose name then some don't decline at all, some use Ledecká (which is coincidentally also a succeful czech winter olympic winner) and decline it accordingly. These cases unaltered sticks out more as a sore thumb in sentences as the masculine (as masculine only form) origin of the adjective/name is prominent, in comparison to names like Osaka or Kerber unaltered (which would otherwise be fixed fro grammatic purposes by adding ová to them).
 

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Zarycka is quite correct by this logic. Zarytsky<->Zarytska. Detiuc should be as Detiucova, but I'm not sure :lol: Detiuc, probably also a Ukrainian surname, but not an adjective, so it does not transform for women, unlike the Czechs...
I am not completely sure but I suspect the written rules probably says something along the line that names of foreigners can be "fixed" be adding -ová etc. But as she would not be a foreigner, she stays Detiuc then. :) I believe that is the case as there are examples of media personalities wanting to be unique, cool, different whatever going for non -ová surnames through marriage even in cases when it doesn't make any sense except doing it for the sake of doing it, even when marrying a compatriot.

For most Czechs it doesn't really matter if Angela Merkel is reffered to as Merkel or Merkelová and that is the case with most surnames, with few cases causing rolled eyes reactions like abominations like Osakaová, when it feels the ová procedure is unnecesarily followed to a t, or on the other hand cases like Eliška Kaplický, widow of the late Jan Kaplický (well-known czech architect) marrying him just in time producing this abomination of a name, instead of doing the decent thing and using Kaplická or her maiden name or any combination of. In Czech using Kaplický (a masculine form of the name) as a woman's name causes awful combination with verbs and pronouns. Don't ask me how and why that is allowed, it is usually not a problem with most people.

Zarycká is simply czech transcription of her name from Cyrillic script rather than english one and she adopted it with her nationality change.

Detiuc name might not be as straighforawrd if she would want to use the ová version, I believe the c in her name is pronounc as k and it might be changed into one, not sure hwo that works (but fonetically Czechs would wrote down the name way differently than Moladavians/Romanians, whatever the latin alphabet origin of her name is).
 

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Zarycká is simply czech transcription of her name from Cyrillic script rather than english one and she adopted it with her nationality change.
I don’t think that you need to do another transcription from the Cyrillic, if this has already been done in the Ukrainian passport... Apparently, when obtaining citizenship, you can come up with a completely new name, why not :lol: But definitely in her case, it is a transcription into Czech spelling :rolleyes:

Detiuc name might not be as straighforawrd if she would want to use the ová version, I believe the c in her name is pronounc as k and it might be changed into one, not sure hwo that works (but fonetically Czechs would wrote down the name way differently than Moladavians/Romanians, whatever the latin alphabet origin of her name is).
Yes, it’s Detyuk :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Pretty much what was said, -ová is not used if the male form of the surname is an obvious adjective (that is a czech one, or obviou slavic one like in Zarytska case) and there is already an existing femining adjective to be used instead (for names from other slavic languages, replacing the last vowel with "á" is the usual way, usually the name already end with "a" without an accent mark anyway*). There are also surnames that have the same form in both genders, albeit those are not very common, usually ending on"ů", that is u with "kroužek" circle above (basically ú, written differently for grammatic reasons), like Janů, Janků, Jirků, Tomšů etc.. Technically the base word would be adjective as well, but unlike regualr adjectives like Černý/Černá (black), you won't see it used as one.¨
¨
There are staunch defenders of the -ová thing and opposite group who consider it archaic nonsense (putting gender arguments into it) while most people don't care. There is kind of a recent fad of taking husband's surname in its male, unaltered from, officially when marrying, which has been a legal option for some time, I guess due to global nature of contemporary world so it makes sense when you marry a foreigner, but it is used extensively by some, and frowned upon by others, especially in cases when the women opts for the male adjective form, like Kaplický. Causing both weird situation as it goes against czech declension rules and the only way to deal with it is not decline it at all, which is the way how Czechs often deal with foreign female names unless they do it officially like public tv, radios etc. who have follow the ová thing (causing odd situations when they ová the foreigners and keep the male form surnams of czech women that opt out for them, which is apparently the officially correct way to do it). But quite often you can catch a sport broadcast with the tv person using the ová altered surnames of competitors while having theior fellow anthlete (reitred, injured or otherwise not competing) as guest, who uses the foreign surnames unaltered as they are used to from contect with them during their careers :)

*Some do not, as in the case of the american swimmer Katie Ledecky, whose name then some don't decline at all, some use Ledecká (which is coincidentally also a succeful czech winter olympic winner) and decline it accordingly. These cases unaltered sticks out more as a sore thumb in sentences as the masculine (as masculine only form) origin of the adjective/name is prominent, in comparison to names like Osaka or Kerber unaltered (which would otherwise be fixed fro grammatic purposes by adding ová to them).
Thank you for this explanation :yeah:

Man, that is so difficult and confusing :crazy: :lol:

And what is YOUR opinion on this mess/the ova-thing ?
 

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