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Thanks to Newmark for posting an article about this event in 1925.

I found his report interesting as Cromer was the only event Suzanne Lenglen played in Great Britain outside of Wimbledon.

All her other tennis appearances in Britain were as a pro.

I tend to think one unusual aspect of the event helped lure her to Cromer-the surface. Most indoor events events in those days were held on lighting fast wood. Cromer was 'en tout cas'-in other words what we would today call clay!
 

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https://www.northnorfolknews.co.uk/news/memories-of-star-studded-tennis-line-ups-at-cromer-tournaments-1-1829265

by Steven Downes
31 January, 2013 - 12:00


A flashback photograph of the covered tennis courts at Newhaven Court at Cromer. Photo: Cromer Museum.

Memories of star-laden tennis tournaments


Memories of star-laden tennis tournaments and O-level night classes have been stirred by our story about the fiery demise of a Cromer hotel.

As reported, Newhaven Court Hotel was destroyed by fire in January 1963 - two years after a blaze destroyed the covered tennis courts in the grounds.

The article set Martin Braybrook rooting through records to find leaflets about 1927 and 1947 tournaments at the courts, which were built by hotel owner and MP Oliver Locker-Lampson.

He found details of an August 1927 tournament that featured: Senorita de Alvarez, the beaten Wimbledon finalist in 1926, 1927 and 1928; Mrs Lambert Chambers, who won the ladies singles at Wimbledon seven times between 1903 and 1914; Mr G R O Crole-Rees, a member of Great Britain’s Davis Cup team; Mr J C Gregory, who went onto be runner-up in the men’s doubles at Wimbledon in 1929.

A letter written by Cromer Covered Courts Club chairman Mr Locker-Lampson, advertising the event, said: “The tournament takes place under cover, and is therefore independent of the weather, but being in the middle of the season the demand for tickets will be considerable.”

At the time, the club’s president was the Earl of Balfour, and vice-presidents were the Earl of Birkenhead and Admiral of the Fleet Earl Jellicoe of Scapa.

Mr Braybrook also found details of the spring tournament of 1947, which saw J E Harper and Mrs E W A Bostock both contesting three finals. Harper was one of the beaten finalists in the Australian men’s doubles of 1937 and Jean Bostock was a regular player at Wimbledon and a member of the British Wightman Cup team.

Tennis was strongly marketed at the hotel, and guests were eligible to become members of the club, with the registered Lawn Tennis Association professional available for coaching and making up games.

The hotel hosted the first organised conference of The Lawn Tennis Professional Association, which was formed in 1946 with Dan Maskell as chairman and the conference made some important decisions, including establishing the five fundamentals of coaching and re-introducing the British professional championships.

The News was also contacted by Peter Bullimore, clerk to Beeston Regis Parish Council, who said: “This article brought back some interesting memories, as I stood and watched the Newhaven Court Hotel fire from the Norwich Road.

“I was in a group of students on our way to an evening class at Cromer High School (the first year that the school introduced

GCE O-levels, which were until then only tackled by the grammar schools.”
 

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While primarily about the Cromer Club -this provides more context for the event: History


A FIFTEEN POINT HISTORY OF TENNIS IN CROMER


  • October 24th 1885: (Norfolk Chronicle) "A meeting was held at Dr. Fenner's on Monday night to arrange for the formation of a cricket and lawn tennis club."
  • 1907: Twelve grass courts were laid down on land adjacent to Norwich Road, Cromer.
  • August 21st 1908: (Cromer Post) "The Cromer Lawn Tennis Club brought their first annual tournament to a successful conclusion on Saturday. There was a large attendance at the finals, affording evidence of the popularity of the gathering. Though the courts were only completed by the end of April, they were in excellent condition, both as regards surface and appointments. For this the committee and the groundsman deserved full share of praise. The total number of events received during the week for the various events was 167." Local dentist Mr. A West Walker was the first winner.
  • August 1919: The Men's Open singles became the Open Singles Championship of Norfolk
  • August 1923: Mrs Winston Churchill played in the Open Mixed Doubles and in the following year the 5th Marquess of Cholmondeley became the first Norfolk player to win the men's Open Championship.
  • August 1926: Two days of heavy rain forced a number of events to be transferred to the indoor courts which were opened at nearby Newhaven Court the previous year. (these were erected at a cost of £10,000 and were the only covered tennis courts outside London)
  • August 1927: Seven times former Wimbledon ladies champion Mrs Dorothea Lambert Chambers won both the ladies and mixed doubles.
  • January 18th 1935: (Norfolk Chronicle) "Cromer Lawn Tennis Club grounds, situated on the Norwich Road, are to be bought for the town by Cromer Urban Council. The price is £1250.
  • August 1953: The tournament was won by Tony Pickard of Derbyshire (who went on to achieve success as coach of Stefan Edberg) while in 1955 the ladies champion was a young Ann Haydon who , as Ann Jones, went on to become Wimbledon ladies champion in 1969.
 
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