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I just went online and booked a time for a corona test and got a time already Monday. It's just 2 km away, so it shouldn't take too long. I have no symptoms.

If the test is negative, then nothing will change in my behavior. I will still be cautious and responsible. Because I could be infected the next day (or actually on the test site itself!).
If the test is positive and I don't have/develops symptoms, I'll have to self-quarantine for 7 days. I must also contact those I've been in contact with the last 2 days and urge them to be tested (not every person - there are some very specific guidelines).
If I'm positive and develops symptoms, I must self-quarantine until 48 hours after all symptoms are gone (except loss of smell/taste which my last for a longer time). I also need to contact others like above.

So even if being tested probably won't change much for me, the fact that testing is done in large numbers will hopefully reduce the spread of the virus in the society. Because many of the asymptomatic cases will be found and quarantined.
 

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Mortality Analyses


@Tim. you had a lot of opinions about America in another thread, thoughts on Belgium here?

Sweden middle of the pack here despite a relatively laissez-faire approach compared to other countries.
First of all Sweden is not "middle of the pack". These are the worst effected countries in the world. Being on this list at all is bad. Whether it is at the top of the list or even at the bottom. That is the most important point.

With regards to Belgium they do have a couple of things that work against them. They are a very small densely populated country in the heart of Western Europe where the vast majority of countries have been hit hard. I am not by any means suggesting Belgium has done well, they transparently have not, but comparing a very very small densely populated country like Belgium with a gigantic country such as the US is like comparing apples and oranges.

Going back to Sweden, simply that they are on this list at all is pretty shocking. They are a very low density population with the highest percentage of single person accommodations in Europe. They are the exact opposite of Spain and Italy where many live in extended families and everyone is touchy feely towards each other. Swedes are pretty cool and reserved people. Sweden is quite simply about the last country in Europe one would have thought would be badly affected by this virus. And yet there they are with a death rate that is approximately 6 times the rate of their Scandinavian neighbours.

As for the US, it should be noted that while many of the European countries on this list have their virus situation under control the US do not and their mortality rate continues to grow. For such a big country that is spread over a huge amount of land that so many people have died there is extremely shaming and it is clear the damage in the US is still ongoing and shows no sign of abating.
 

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I just went online and booked a time for a corona test and got a time already Monday. It's just 2 km away, so it shouldn't take too long. I have no symptoms.

If the test is negative, then nothing will change in my behavior. I will still be cautious and responsible. Because I could be infected the next day (or actually on the test site itself!).
If the test is positive and I don't have/develops symptoms, I'll have to self-quarantine for 7 days. I must also contact those I've been in contact with the last 2 days and urge them to be tested (not every person - there are some very specific guidelines).
If I'm positive and develops symptoms, I must self-quarantine until 48 hours after all symptoms are gone (except loss of smell/taste which my last for a longer time). I also need to contact others like above.

So even if being tested probably won't change much for me, the fact that testing is done in large numbers will hopefully reduce the spread of the virus in the society. Because many of the asymptomatic cases will be found and quarantined.
I saw a report today on CNN about Denmark's reopening of schools and there were debates if this could serve as a model for the U.S. If I'm not mistaken, some classes in Denmark are now being held even in churches or other unusual places.
 

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Situation in our countries remain quite similar after 2 months, ok you have 2000 more cases(5m.more inhabitants) but both have 304 deaths and this has been growing similarly in both countries... How is the Czechian situation in ICU? We in FIN have only 20 people in intensive care and 98 in other hospital care...
Thanks for update. There are currently 156 hospitalized folks and 29 of them are in intensive care. So it's quite similar to Finland, but we probably had much bigger initial load of cases imported by 'Italian skiers', i.e. Czechs who had been on a skiing holiday in ITA.

Not sure who was the 'patient zero' in Finland, but the very first COVID-19 case here was a man from Western Bohemia, who had just returned from a skiing holiday in the North Italian region of Veneto.

The first 'home-grown case' was a Prague cab driver, who was believed to have caught the virus from a tourist and would then become the media face of the pandemic, because his very serious condition was being treated with the experimental drug Remdesivir (specially flown in for the purpose from the US) and eventually he miraculously recovered and even gave a news conference at the hospital.

On a side note, one of Gilead Sciences's vice-presidents is a Czech biochemist and it is widely expected that in the autumn he will be one of those to be awarded a special State decoration by the country's president for his contributions to developing Remdesivir.
 

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Good post. Though I'm not sure 'population density' explains all of these numbers away. Why is Belgium's CFR so high?

Canada
84,882 Cases and 6,421 Fatalities / Population 37.5 million
17.2 Deaths / 100k
Case Fatality Ratio 7.5%



However there is huge variation between different parts of Canada

Quebec: 46,838 cases, 3940 Fatalities / Population 8.49 million
46.4 Deaths /100k
CFRatio 8.4%

Ontario: 26,301 cases, 2,114 Fatalities / Population 14.57 million
14.5 Deaths /100k
CFRatio 8.0%

Canada excluding Ontario and Qubec
11,743 cases, 367 Deaths / Population 14.4 million
2.5 Deaths / 100k
CFRatio 3.1%


Quebec is a gong show. They rival the worst in Europe in terms of deaths per capita. Ontario is a little better, around the European average comparable to Germany.

The primary driver of the CFR is how well the jursidiction prevented Covid from entering senior's care homes and communities. Over 80% of Fatalities are in care homes.
 

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Good post. Though I'm not sure 'population density' explains all of these numbers away. Why is Belgium's CFR so high?

I think Belgium is more-or-less the opposite of Russia, being very rigorous about reporting all fatalities involving someone infected with the coronavirus, even when it was comorbid with another medical condition that may arguably have been the 'direct' cause of death. Russia, on the other hand, seems to be concertedly focusing on the comorbid condition in its reporting.
 

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Interesting to see the per capita mortalities and CFR so here goes.


Canada
84,882 Cases and 6,421 Fatalities / Population 37.5 million
17.2 Deaths / 100k
Case Fatality Ratio 7.5%



However there is huge variation between different parts of Canada. Quebec is an absolute gong show. They rival the worst in Europe in terms of deaths per capita. Ontario is a little better, around the European average comparable to Germany.


Quebec: 46,838 cases, 3940 Fatalities / Population 8.49 million
46.4 Deaths /100k
CFRatio 8.4%

Ontario: 26,301 cases, 2,114 Fatalities / Population 14.57 million
14.5 Deaths /100k
CFRatio 8.0%

Canada excluding Ontario and Qubec
11,743 cases, 367 Deaths / Population 14.4 million
2.5 Deaths / 100k
CFRatio 3.1%


Alberta and British Columbia together account for most of the remaining fatalities. (Totals: 292 deaths/ pop. 9.3 million) The primary driver of the CFR is how well the jursidiction prevented Covid from entering senior's care homes and communities. Over 80% of fatalities are in care homes.



Let's visit Montreal shall we?

  • "she said the number of hospitalizations in this province due to the coronavirus had dropped overnight from 1,784 to 1,516.

    "As she explained, the 15-per-cent reduction had been achieved simply by redefining the word “hospitalization;” it no longer included COVID patients who had been succesfully cured of the virus but were still in hospital because there was no room for them elsewhere."
This is coded bureaucrat speak for "268 seniors who need to be in care homes were successfully treated Covid-19 in hospital but we can't send them home because their care home's condition is so terrible the staff quit for fear of infection and are are now staffed by the Canadian Army."
 

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Good post. Though I'm not sure 'population density' explains all of these numbers away. Why is Belgium's CFR so high?

The UK and US were reporting higher CFR for blacks due to a number of reasons (comorbidities, overcrowded living conditions, poverty and poor access to medical care}. I wonder if this is also the case for France and Belgium. They have a large number of immigrants from Francophone African countries concentrated in Paris and Brussels.
 

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I saw a report today on CNN about Denmark's reopening of schools and there were debates if this could serve as a model for the U.S. If I'm not mistaken, some classes in Denmark are now being held even in churches or other unusual places.
True. Even sports arenas and stadiums used as school classes. Being outdoors is prioritized if weather allows it (nature, woods, beaches - even schoolyards are considered better/safer than classrooms).

EDIT: Article in English about FC Copenhagen's stadium being used as school.

Personally I think we're opening too much at once. So many of my contacts are posting pictures on social medias having dinner at restaurants (now finally opened after more than 2 months). I don't know why it's so important to go to restaurants on day 1 after the lockdown? But I can't really judge them. It's their lives too, and their voice is as important as mine. Some people are obviously more sick and tired of the lockdowns than I am. Many places around the world are hit much harder, and many people will just have to carry on with their normal lives/work as if the virus wasn't there simply to make a living. So I feel kind of spoiled complaining about Denmark opening up.
 

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...

Personally I think we're opening too much at once. So many of my contacts are posting pictures on social medias having dinner at restaurants (now finally opened after more than 2 months). I don't know why it's so important to go to restaurants on day 1 after the lockdown?...
Restaurants weren't open for us (for dining-in) until 10 days ago, and bars reopened on Thursday, but the queues for (contactless) takeaway foods at the end of lockdown beggared belief. Some outlets opened at one minute past midnight, and had queues which stretched for hundreds of metres. It's as if the takeaway experience of burgers and fries was essential to life - even though people who wanted to could quite easily purchase the ingredients from supermarkets and make their own!
 

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The UK and US were reporting higher CFR for blacks due to a number of reasons (comorbidities, overcrowded living conditions, poverty and poor access to medical care}. I wonder if this is also the case for France and Belgium. They have a large number of immigrants from Francophone African countries concentrated in Paris and Brussels.
18% of Denmark's cases are among immigrants from Non-Western countries - a group which only represents 9% of Denmark's population. I'm talking of infected cases; I don't have mortality data. It's stressed that the difference is not due to more testing among non-Western immigrants. There are big differences from nation to nation, though. There are fewer cases among immigrants from Poland or China, for instance, than in the "native" Danish population. Some reasons to more cases among immigrants are that they often live in larger families, or that they tend to live in the Copenhagen area, which is hit somewhat worse than typical Danish cities. Maybe there's also some lack of information from the authorities in languages other than Danish.
 

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The UK and US were reporting higher CFR for blacks due to a number of reasons (comorbidities, overcrowded living conditions, poverty and poor access to medical care}. I wonder if this is also the case for France and Belgium. They have a large number of immigrants from Francophone African countries concentrated in Paris and Brussels.
In the UK, the number was high even after removing the socio economic factors .

According to this, black people 4x more likely to die of COVID-19 than white people, even when socioeconomic factors removed. PFA asks Premier League to research Covid-19's impact on BAME players | Premier League | The Guardia




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Thanks for update. There are currently 156 hospitalized folks and 29 of them are in intensive care. So it's quite similar to Finland, but we probably had much bigger initial load of cases imported by 'Italian skiers', i.e. Czechs who had been on a skiing holiday in ITA.

Not sure who was the 'patient zero' in Finland, but the very first COVID-19 case here was a man from Western Bohemia, who had just returned from a skiing holiday in the North Italian region of Veneto.
1st case in FIN was a 32-yo. chinese tourist from Wuhan in 29th of january in Lapland, was hospitalized couple of weeks and cured from the disease...
Not sure who was the 1st Finn to get it...
 

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I feel like Russia has become the go-to escape goat for all things problematic. All countries have underreported not only the number of cases but also the number of fatalities. Although in Russia, the ratio between reported cases to reported fatalities is surprisingly very low.

This hysteria is US generated for the most part. I remember when Covid19 was in China, everyone was like, this is actually a very dangerous life threatening disease, China is lying, coronavirus is highly fatal, looked at this (unvetted) video from China where people are dropping down like flies. These are the same people that are now saying Coronavirus is not any more dangerous than flu with less than 1% mortality rate and unless you have underlying medical condition there is no way anything will happen to you.
 

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I looked at the top 20 countries, and 10 are ruled by people whose policies and principles I find nauseating. Notorious bunch, all bark no bite when it comes to dealing with a crises.
I looked at the same list and my count is 15.
 

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I feel like Russia has become the go-to escape goat for all things problematic. All countries have underreported not only the number of cases but also the number of fatalities. Although in Russia, the ratio between reported cases to reported fatalities is surprisingly very low.
No, they haven't.

This hysteria is US generated for the most part. I remember when Covid19 was in China, everyone was like, this is actually a very dangerous life threatening disease, China is lying, coronavirus is highly fatal, looked at this (unvetted) video from China where people are dropping down like flies. These are the same people that are now saying Coronavirus is not any more dangerous than flu with less than 1% mortality rate and unless you have underlying medical condition there is no way anything will happen to you.
Yes, and I'm sure you know that the last statement is bullshit. There are thousands of people with no underlying conditions who have caught Covid-19, and many of those have died from it. Even a 1% mortality rate for a disease is incredibly high in the modern world.
 

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No, they haven't.



Yes, and I'm sure you know that the last statement is bullshit. There are thousands of people with no underlying conditions who have caught Covid-19, and many of those have died from it. Even a 1% mortality rate for a disease is incredibly high in the modern world.
My point isn't that coronavirus is not dangerous. My point is the hypocrisy of people who were posting unvetted videos of Chinese people dropping dead on the street and claiming how deadly this virus is, are the same people who are saying now that coronavirus is just like flu and you are safe as long as you are not old or have a chronic condition when their own country is now dealing with COVID19.

That's what happens when we start mixing political partisanship in everyday issues.
 

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True. Even sports arenas and stadiums used as school classes. Being outdoors is prioritized if weather allows it (nature, woods, beaches - even schoolyards are considered better/safer than classrooms).

EDIT: Article in English about FC Copenhagen's stadium being used as school.

Personally I think we're opening too much at once. So many of my contacts are posting pictures on social medias having dinner at restaurants (now finally opened after more than 2 months). I don't know why it's so important to go to restaurants on day 1 after the lockdown? But I can't really judge them. It's their lives too, and their voice is as important as mine. Some people are obviously more sick and tired of the lockdowns than I am. Many places around the world are hit much harder, and many people will just have to carry on with their normal lives/work as if the virus wasn't there simply to make a living. So I feel kind of spoiled complaining about Denmark opening up.(y)
Holding classes in sports arena or stadiums is a great idea actually, especially with the summer approaching and outdoor temperatures rising. In Czechia there has been a silly debate about schools and classrooms being too small to ensure keeping enough distance between pupils, while there being other obvious options available.

Actually, during the so-called Velvet Revolution of November 1989, when communist regimes were crumbling around Eastern Europe, it was common that an entire school - teachers and students alike - would gather in the school's gym, being the largest indoor room available, to discuss the latest developments, sing songs, etc.

As for Denmark: it's reputation was already excellent before the pandemic struck and now it's profile will be even higher - a well-run small country being a role model in many areas (well maybe besides some problems with immigrants, but that's a different debate) such as massive support for renewable energy or cycling.

In fact, even the British minister for transport has said that the UK is going to invest heavily in boosting the cycling infrastructure and bike sales in the country are soaring, one of the reasons being that bikers can easily keep a distance among themselves on their daily commutes to work and don't have to be packed inside a crowded public bus or train when a viral disease is still around.

So while some countries are only discovering the benefits of cycling, Denmark is already leading the pack (y)
 
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