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It's spelled differently but the Czech digraphs are effectively the same as Polish digraphs: č = cz, ř = rz and the ambiguous š which equals to either sz or ś in Polish ;)
Yeah, but you guys have some crazy rules on top of that, average Czech (exluding those living near the border) would never get how Lodz is supposed to be pronounced.
 

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It's pronounced right at the start here. Krejcik means 'tailor' in Czech (obviously the feminile version of the name for any Czech female so it's Krejcikova).

Nitpicking, krejčí means tailor (quite common surname as well, one Krejčí plays for Boston Bruins for example), Krejčík is already diminutive. :)
I believe Krejčí is one of those rarer surnames that doesn't add -ová. Krejčík already conveniently ends with a k so no problem adding it.
 

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They dont get Maky name right either. But I am not pissed because of it that would be hypocritical given my inability to pronounce anything correctly. :D
Tbh, I am used to better standards by our commentators that prepare for events they would be commenting and not only have pronounciation figured out (and with a capella text to speech opportunities these days, there is no excuse, really) but having sheet with on every soccer/hockey player involved in the match (+ referees) reagerding not just careers, civil ocupations but personal info (family, hobbies) and are able to use it live. Think Záruba, Bosák as examples. But there are bad apples like Rejman, who not only fails at following what is happening on biathlon course, but manages to pronounce Chloe like CLUE etc.
 

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Well, Polish commentators went with Woźniacka all the time after she gave the permission to pronounce it like that on Polish TV. Pronouncing her name as Wozniacki or the dreaded English "Wozniaki" would be a travesty since the name is purely Polish to begin with ;)
Understandable. BTW why is Justyna Święty, Święty and not Święta?
 

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I actually only learned to properly pronounce the Czech city Olomouc like last month. :D It really shouldn't have taken me so long considering its history as a bit of a holy city in the history of gymnastics (an incredibly special and rare competition took place there).
Olomouc is actually in the lyrics of R.E.M.'s song Disappear. Pronounced so so (Stipe could possible heard a regional dialect pronounciation), but still.
 

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Hahaha, I totally understand this as a HUGE Olga Mostepanova fan, I only found out how to pronounce Olomouc correctly about two years ago and probably cannot do it correctly anymore.
o = o (like in shot)
ou = oh
c = ts (one sound, not one after the other)
the rest should be straightforward.
3 syllables, O - lo - mowts

It is possible to encounter a dialect pronouncing ou like oo in doors or somebody overdoing it and rather mocking that with adding non-silent h at the beginning (technically that would be writen down as Holomóc, but it is not really used in written form).
 

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Also, I'm curious with the Poles, having grown up in Chicago with a significant Polish immigrant population if Polish sports commentators would pronounce third generation Polish-North American names, like Gabriela Dabrowski or Tara Lipinski in the traditional Polish manner when their first names are so clearly NOT Polish.
Not Polish, but czech sport commentators pronounce north american athletes the american way, even in cases like Stastny (hockey player, while the previous generation were still Šťastný) and funny situation emerged with olympic winners - one one hand the swimmer Ledecky while czech skier/snowboarder Ledecká won not long after, both obviously stemming from the same surname, one pronounced with k and y and the other with ts and ah (and that is how commentators did it).
 

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Some bad pronunciations I've heard:

Caroline "WOES-niacki" (Pam Shriver, lol)

Simona "HAY-lep"

Kaia "Canopy"

Belinda "Ben-Chick"


And one from the ATP tour:

Marton "Fuck-sovitch" (Brad Gilbert, I think he does this on purpose)
 
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Barbara Taylor - now that is a very typical British name!
Yeah, the problem with czech, but not only, is that the peculiar czech ortography uses diacritic and accute accents and more importantly carons are readily dropped, meaning you have no clue whether they were there and where and how to pronounce a word and even less so a name. Some try to guess and overcompensate and pronounce them where they weren't, I recall rahther obscure soccer played playingin german bundesliga back then experiencing his name (Týce "tee-tseh) from german version Tietze) being pronounced both Tice or Tee - cheh at times.
 

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Understandable. BTW why is Justyna Święty, Święty and not Święta?
It was her personal choice. We don't have a mandatory rule to feminile adjective forms for women. Either Świety or Święta would be correct.

Btw, yeah, some of the shorter Polish words can be the most difficult to pronounce like Łódź :ROFLMAO: Magdalena Fręch was born in Łódź for instance ;)
 
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Tbh, I am used to better standards by our commentators that prepare for events they would be commenting and not only have pronounciation figured out (and with a capella text to speech opportunities these days, there is no excuse, really) but having sheet with on every soccer/hockey player involved in the match (+ referees) reagerding not just careers, civil ocupations but personal info (family, hobbies) and are able to use it live. Think Záruba, Bosák as examples. But there are bad apples like Rejman, who not only fails at following what is happening on biathlon course, but manages to pronounce Chloe like CLUE etc.
Yes but they still say Sharapovova.
 

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Are there a lot of people who do voice their annoyance over it in Czechia? I mean this is ridiculous for foreign names yet you keep doing it.
Yes. But commentators need to use it as it is official czech rule. It is up to linguists to change it. We are now taking decision for czech women to choose if they want ova or not. My friend with mongolian name had to add “ova” to her name after she became czech citizen.
 

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Polish Świątek is far more difficult to pronounce than Russian Павлюченкова.
Let the commentators call her Anastasia Sergueïevna :LOL:
It's actually not as hard as you may think, especially for a French speaker since the Polish "ą" is kind of a mix between the French sounds "an" and "on" (with the final "n" being non silent). So it's just "Chfiantek" ("ch" like in "chemin").
 

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Brand new. People have a hard time pronouncing sounds and words that are different from their languages. Wow. Never knew.

Our jaws, lips, tongues and larynx are not shaping up in the same ways because of our mother tongue so it's not always a lack of trying or bad effort. It's sometimes just the complete inability to pronounce a sound the same way.
 
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