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Discussion Starter #81 (Edited)
Sally Forrest and Robert Clarke, in a wonderful promotional picture for the 1951 tennis movie Hard Fast and Beautiful. The movie was directed by Ida Lupino, one of the first women to direct films in Hollywood. It was basically a veiled fictionalization of tennis star Helen Wills Moody.

Sally Forrest (1928 – 2015), was an American film, stage and TV actress of the 1940s and 1950s. Her musical background and training as a jazz and ballet dancer brought roles in the transitional musicals that rounded off the golden age of MGM; most notable was Excuse My Dust as the leading lady for Red Skelton (1951).
Most of her films were made under contract to MGM, which prided itself as family entertainment, but RKO, headed by the eccentric and controlling Howard Hughes, presented a very different creative challenge. Son of Sinbad (1955), now a cult classic, was one of his many pet projects where he had a personal interest in re-designing the star's skimpy wardrobe. With each rehearsal, Forrest noticed her harem dance costume slowly disappearing, until it was barely compliant with the Motion Picture Production Code.
Video of Sally's sexy harem dance ------> HERE

Original monochrome picture HERE






"Gorgeous Gussie" Moran wearing a Brooklyn Dodgers sweater (1955).
After she quit playing exibition tennis matches as a pro (that was a disaster), Moran went on to work in radio as a sports director and in television hosting interview shows, all in Los Angeles. She was also a radio sportscaster in New York on WMGM, marketed her own line of tennis clothes, wrote for tennis magazines and taught tennis.

While working at WMGM in 1955, she had the opportunity to co-host the Brooklyn Dodgers pregame shows with Marty Glickman. Unfortunately that wasn't going to last because, after the 1956 season, the Dodgers moved to L.A. There is also a similar photo of Moran wearing the Yankees sweater, but that was only to help WMGM promote their coverage of the Yankees after the Dodgers had moved. Shortly after, she also moved to L.A.
She was definitely one of the first American female sportscaster (if not the first ever) in a major media market.

Original monochrome picture HERE

 

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Discussion Starter #82 (Edited)
(left) Christina Sandberg (born 11 January 1948) is a former professional Swedish tennis player. Sandberg became the first Swedish player to win the Swedish Open twice running when she won it in 1965 and 1966. She reached the quarter finals of the 1970 Australian Open in both the singles and doubles. She played for Sweden in the Federation Cup in 25 matches, and upsetted home favorite Virginia Wade in the first round of the 1968 Wimbledon Championships.

(center) Evonne Goolagong (born 31 July 1951), is an Australian former world No. 1 tennis player. She was one of the world's leading players in the 1970s and early 1980s, and the number one Australian pro on tour after the retirement of Margaret Court. At the age of 19, Goolagong won the French Open singles crown and the Australian Open doubles championships (with Margaret Court). She followed those up with a victory in the ladies singles at Wimbledon on 2 July, 1971. In 1980, she became the first mother to win Wimbledon in 66 years. Goolagong would go on to win 14 Grand Slam tournament titles: seven in singles (four at the Australian Open, two at Wimbledon and one at the French Open), six in women's doubles, and one in mixed doubles. She represented Australia in three Fed Cups, winning the title in 1971, 1973 and 1974, and was Fed Cup captain for three consecutive years.
Goolagong was appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire in 1972 and Officer of the Order of Australia in 1982. She was inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame in 1988. Tennis Australia has appointed Goolagong as an "Ambassador for the Sport of Tennis in Australia."
Since 2005, she has run the Goolagong National Development Camp for Indigenous boys and girls, to help promote better health, education and employment.

(right) Patricia A. Edwards is a retired Australian tennis player. She won the girls' double title in the Australian Open twice, in 1969 and 1971. Edwards' father, tennis coach Vic Edwards, was also Evonne Goolagong's coach. Edwards and Goolagong trained together and were doubles partners in international competitions in 1970 and 1971, including at Wimbledon in 1970. They were already friends at 11 or 12 years old.

Original monochrome picture HERE
Circa 1969






December 1929, a Suzanne Lenglen doll held by the real Suzanne. Or was it a Voodoo doll used by her opponents before they realized it didn't work. :ROFLMAO:

Original monochrome picture HERE
Recent closeup of the doll HERE

 

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Discussion Starter #83 (Edited)
Betty May Nuthall (1911 – 1983) was an English tennis player known for her powerful forehand. She won one singles slam title, four slam double titles, and four mixed double titles.

She was an early bloomer. She won the junior lawn championship at the young age of 13. In 1927 at the age of 16, Nuthall tied Elisabeth Moore as the then-youngest women's singles finalist ever at the U. S. National Championships. Still at 16, Nuthall played on the British Wightman Cup team and defeated Helen Jacobs in her debut.
In 1930, Nuthall became the first non-American since 1892 to win a women's singles title at the U. S. National Championships. She was the last British female player to win the title until Virginia Wade won in 1968. At the U.S. Championships in 1933, Nuthall won a quarterfinal versus Alice Marble 6–8, 6–0, 7–5 after being down two breaks of serve at 1–5 in the final set. In the semifinal versus Helen Wills, Nuthall won the first set 6–2 in just 12 minutes, which was the first set Wills had lost at this tournament in seven years since 1926 (the year Lenglen left the tour). Wills, however, turned around the match and won the last two sets 6–3, 6–2 despite losing her serve twice in the second set. Nuthall never again reached the quarterfinals of a Grand Slam singles tournament, mainly because her career was cut short by WWII. She was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1977.

She was 15 when this picture was shot in 1926. She looked older than her age judging from some pictures when she was 13. She gets my vote for the prettiest eyes in the history women tennis.

Original monochrome picture HERE






Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire in a scene from the 1949 MGM musical film The Barkleys of Broadway. It reunited Astaire and Rogers in a motion picture after ten years apart. Rogers came in as a last minute replacement for Judy Garland, whose frequent absences due to a dependency on pep pills and sleeping pills cost her the role. The film had gone into rehearsals with Garland, but it was soon clear that she would not be physically and emotionally able to do it for she had been in a deep depression for two years. The MGM studio chief contacted Ginger Rogers to see if she was interested in reuniting with Astaire: there had been rumors, denied by both, that the Astaire-Rogers working relationship had not been particularly warm since their last film together 10 years before. This turned out to be the last film that Astaire and Rogers made together, and their only film together in color. Subsequently Judy garland was dismissed for 2 more films, she attempted suicide twice, divorced Minnelli and left MGM.

Original monochrome picture HERE

 

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Discussion Starter #84 (Edited)
Angela Buxton (16 August 1934 – 14 August 2020) was a British tennis player. She had Jewish heritage and faced anti-Semitism throughout her career. She was one of the first to be inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame, in 1981, and wrote several tennis books.
Buxton and Althea Gibson won the doubles titles at the French Open and Wimbledon in 1956, with Buxton also reaching the singles final at the All England Club that year. Buxton was forced to retire at the end of the 1957 season, at the age of 22, because of a serious hand injury (tenosynovitis). Katrina Adams, a former tennis player who has promoted equal rights in the game, said Angela "championed the friendship and support of Althea Gibson when no one else would, in a racist era in our sport in the '50s."

1954 original monochrome picture HERE





Donna Reed (1921 – 1986) was an American film, television actress, and producer. She was born Donna Belle Mullenger. When she signed with MGM, they soon changed her name to Donna Reed, as there was anti-German feeling during World War II. Reed once said "A studio publicist hung the name on me, and I never did like it". "I hear `Donna Reed' and I think of a tall, chic, austere blonde that isn't me. It has a cold, forbidding sound."

Her career spanned more than 40 years, with performances in more than 40 films. She is well known for her role as Mary Hatch Bailey in Frank Capra's 1946 film It's a Wonderful Life. In 1953, she received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance as Lorene Burke in the war drama From Here to Eternity.
Reed is known for her work in television, notably as Donna Stone, a middle-class American mother and housewife in the sitcom The Donna Reed Show (1958–1966), in which her character was more assertive than most other television mothers of the era. She received numerous Emmy Award nominations for this role and the Golden Globe Award for Best TV Star in 1963. Later in her career, Reed replaced Barbara Bel Geddes as Miss Ellie Ewing Farlow in the 1984–1985 season of Dallas; she sued the production company for breach of contract when she was abruptly fired upon Bel Geddes' decision to return to the show, but Donna died the next year of pancreatic cancer. She has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1610 Vine Street.

Original monochrome picture HERE
(circa 1948)

 

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Discussion Starter #85 (Edited)
Steffi Graf, born 14 June 1969, is a German former professional tennis player. She won seven singles titles at Wimbledon, six singles titles at the French Open, five singles titles at the US Open, and four singles titles at the Australian Open. Her overall record in 56 Grand Slam events was 282–32 (89 percent) (87–10 at the French Open, 75–7 at Wimbledon, 73–9 at the US Open, and 47–6 at the Australian Open). Her career prize-money earnings totalled US$21,895,277 (a record until Lindsay Davenport surpassed this amount in January 2008). Her singles win-loss record was 900–115 (88.7 percent).[106] She was ranked World No. 1 for 186 consecutive weeks (from August 1987 to March 1991, tied with Serena Williams, a record in the women's game) and a record total 377 weeks overall.

In personal terms, 1995 was a difficult year for Graf, as she was accused by German authorities of tax evasion in the early years of her career. In her defense, she stated that her father Peter was her financial manager, and all financial matters relating to her earnings at the time had been under his control. Her father was arrested in August and was sentenced to 45 months in jail. He was eventually released after serving 25 months. Prosecutors dropped their case against Steffi in 1997, when she agreed to pay a fine of 1.3 million Deutsche Marks to the government and an unspecified charity.

On 13 August 1999, shortly after retiring with a strained hamstring from a second round match in San Diego, Graf announced her retirement from the women's tour at age 30. She was ranked No. 3 at that time and said, "I have done everything I wanted to do in tennis. I feel I have nothing left to accomplish. The weeks following Wimbledon [in 1999] weren't easy for me. I was not having fun anymore. After Wimbledon, for the first time in my career, I didn't feel like going to a tournament. My motivation wasn't what it was in the past."

Original monochrome picture HERE
Circa 1976






Sylvia Henrotin (née Jung; 1904 - 1970) was a French female tennis player who was active during the late 1920 and the 1930s. She had her best results in the doubles event, finishing runner-up in seven Grand Slam doubles and mixed-doubles competitions. In August 1936, she won the singles title at the Eastern Grass Court Championships in Rye, U.S. by victories against Alice Marble and Helen Pedersen in the semifinal and final respectively. In January 1937 (the image bellow), she won the singles, doubles and mixed-doubles title at the US Indoor Championships.

Original monochrome picture HERE

 

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Discussion Starter #86 (Edited)
Most tennis fans can recall the accomplishments of the great women players in the Open Era, but only true connoisseurs of tennis history can detail the remarkable exploits of Anna Margarethe Molla Bjurstedt Mallory. Despite winning the Bronze Medal in singles at the 1912 Summer Olympic Games in Stockholm, Sweden, the Norwegian-born Mallory arrived in the United States in 1914 at age 30 with little fanfare and ostensibly to work as a masseuse. She would ultimately become one of the biggest names the sport has ever seen, winning a record eight U.S. National Women’s Singles Championships against eight different opponents. For that to materialize, however, Mallory would have to defeat the era’s most talented and recognizable players, including Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman, Helen Wills, Mary K. Browne, and Frenchwomen Suzanne Lenglen, the game’s most colorful and dominant player, to secure her place in history. She accomplished that task in droves, earned immortality with her enshrinement into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1958. In 2008, 50 years after her induction, Mallory’s name was placed in the Court of Champions at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center alongside King, Chris Evert, and Martina Navratilova.

The first of Mallory's eight U.S. National Championships came as a 31-year-old against Wightman in 1915, coming back from dropping the first set 6-4 to ease into a 6-2, 6-0 victory. Her last was achieved as a 42-year old in 1926, making her the oldest champion in history. She clawed back from a 0-4 final set deficit to capture her eighth title against American Elizabeth Ryan, 4-6 6-4 9-7.

Mallory’s game was founded on fitness, strength, and size. She could play longer, hit harder, and move around the court better than her opponents. She played with supreme confidence and focus and attacked every rally as if it were match point. In one of her few published quotes, Mallory said, “I find that the girls generally do not hit the ball as hard as they should. I believe in always hitting the ball with all my might, but there seems to be a disposition to ‘just get it over’ in many girls whom I have played. I do not call this tennis.”

Mallory won five of her eight U.S. Championships before gaining true celebrity. In her 1921 second round match against the flamboyant Lenglen – the Frenchwomen’s only appearance at the U.S. Nationals – Mallory ran her opponent rampant, pushing her to exhaustion and cracking what had been an invincible player. Mallory cruised 6-2 in the first set. Two points into the second set Lenglen retired, informing the chair umpire of ill health. Mallory, who played in every U.S. National Championship from 1915-1929, finished her love affair with the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills as a singles semifinalist in 1929. Adding to her record titles were two additional finalist appearances (1923, 1924) and three trips to the semifinals. Her “worst” result was the quarterfinals in 1927. Tack on two U.S. National Women’s Doubles Championship titles (1916, 1917) and three in mixed doubles (1917, 1922, 1923) and the breadth of her career becomes crystallized. Two of those titles came with partner Bill Tilden, a formidable mixed doubles team as the sport has ever seen. On seven other combined occasions Mallory was a doubles and mixed doubles finalist.

In 1922, she made her lone Wimbledon Ladies Singles Championship final, falling to Lenglen 6-2, 6-0 in 26 minutes, reportedly the shortest major final in history. She was a Wimbledon semifinalist in 1926, the year she won her last U.S. title. Mallory played on winning Wightman Cup teams in 1923 and 1927. Her remarkable career had her ranked in the world’s Top 10 three times (1925-27) and the U.S. No. 1 player seven times (1915-16, 1918, 1920-22, 1926, 1929).
Source: International Hall of Fame

Note: Some might doubt this is really a picture of Molla, as I did. But a closer examination of her teeth and mouth from 2 pictures proves this is a genuine photo of Molla, but probably when she was in her mid twenties or at the most 30 years old. The date of this picture is uncertain. Somewhere between 1915 to 1924. I lean more towards 1915 because she would have been 40 in 1924 if her birth year is really 1884 (according to Wikipedia). However the birth year is said to be 1892 from some other sources. Anyhow this picture hosted by the National Portrait Gallery from the famous photographic company Bassano LTD. is amazing for its quality at such an early date in time, shot outside of a studio. Obviously their photographic gear was at the cutting edge technology.
Regarding the skin tone, I hope it's not too far from the true skin tone she had early in her career. Given the possibility that she had genes of the northern Europe natives (possibly the Sami People), and that she seemed to have a pretty dark skin tone later in her tennis career, I figured the tone and color could be close to this, but there's no way to be certain.
Many thanks @Rollo for your help.

Original monochrome picture HERE

 

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Love the recent batch of photos.

Having Molla in vivid color. And love the angle of the Henrotin picture-the camera angle from above like that is rare, and it's very cool that in your colorized photo we can see the boards on the indoor court.

Little Steffi is too cute for words......
 

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Discussion Starter #88 (Edited)
(Right) Cilly Aussem (1909 – 1963) was the first German, male or female, to win the singles title at Wimbledon, which she did in 1931. She also won the women's single titles at the French Championships and German Championships in 1931. Aussem, who was described as a graceful, small, and psychologically sensitive girl, seemed incapable of withstanding the mental and physical pressures of competitive sports. During the family's summer vacation at the French Riviera, Aussem's ambitious mother asked the world's best player, Bill Tilden, for advice. After having a look at small, shy, Cilly he replied: "My dear lady, Cilly will become a great champion, if you take the next train back to Germany!" Tilden became Aussem's coach and made her a world class player. Aussem's trademark became her powerful flat forehand. Newspaper articles said that Aussem had a great sliced backhand and effective drop shots. But her biggest qualities were her precision, athletic conditioning, and fighting spirit.

:ROFLMAO: Fun Fact: In 1928 Aussem's mother claimed that Paula von Reznicek had twice beaten her daughter by using hypnotism o_O , which led to a lawsuit in which Von Reznicek filed charges of 'defamation of character' and Aussem's mother charged her with 'insulting assault'.

(Left) Eileen Viviyen Bennett Whittingstall (née Bennett; 1907 – 1979) was a tennis player from the United Kingdom who won six Grand Slam doubles titles from 1927 to 1931. Although most of her success was in women's doubles or mixed doubles, Eileen reached the singles final of the 1928 French Championships and the 1931 US Championships. She lost both of these finals in straight sets to Helen Wills Moody.
According to A. Wallis Myers of The Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail, She was ranked in the world top 10 in 1928, 1929, 1931, and 1932, reaching a career high of World No. 3 in those rankings in 1931.
Eileen is credited with first wearing an above-the-knee form of divided skirt for competitive tennis.

Original monochrome picture from June 1927 HERE

 

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Discussion Starter #89 (Edited)
Awesome portrait from 1961 of American actress, Margie Regan, born in 1942. She was known for only 3 TV series, Sea Hunt (1958), Michael Shayne (1960) and 87th Precinct (1961).

Original monochrome picture HERE






Unknown model from the 1940s. This outfit seems to me like it's in the style of the American Navy. Pretty cool looking.

Original monochrome picture HERE

 

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Discussion Starter #91 (Edited)
Marguerite Broquedis (married names Billout-Bordes) 1893 – 1983) was a French tennis player. She competed at the 1912 Olympics at Stockholm where she won the gold medal in singles by beating German Dora Köring 4–6, 6–3, 6–4 in the final. The bronze medal was won by Molla Bjurstedt (Mallory) of Norway.
In 1913 and 1914, Broquedis won the French championships, beating Suzanne Lenglen in the 1914 final. Broquedis, nicknamed "the goddess", is known for being the only player to ever beat Lenglen in a fully played singles final, but Lenglen was only 15. Broquedis also took part in the 1924 Olympics at Paris but couldn't win any medal there. (Gold went to Helen Wills, Silver to Julie Vlasto of France, Bronze to Kathleen McKane of GB)

She won the singles title at the French Covered Court Championships on six occasions (1910, 1912–13, 1922, 1925, and 1927). From 1925 to 1927, Broquedis had another successful time in her tennis career, reaching the singles semifinals at Wimbledon in 1925, and the quarterfinals twice at the (now fully international) French championships in 1925 and 1927.

Original monochrome picture from 1912 HERE





Cheryl Miller (born February 4, 1943) is an American actress and musician. The film Casanova Brown (1944) marked her screen debut as a baby at the age of 19 days. 1965 was a break-through year for Miller. She was featured with an elephant and a chimp on the hit TV series Flipper. This caught the attention of the director (Ivan Tors) who later cast her in the film, Clarence, the Cross-Eyed Lion with (Marshall Thompson). In this film she played Paula Tracy, the daughter of veterinarian Marsh Tracy (Marshall Thompson). The film led to her role again playing Paula Tracy alongside Thompson in the CBS television series, Daktari, (1966–69).

During the summer of 1965, Walt Disney chose Miller as his own contractee, dubbing her "The Typical American Girl". By early 1966, filming began for Daktari in Africa, U.S.A., a 200-acre ranch about 40 miles north of the Los Angeles metro area. Later that year, Miller was one of 13 young actresses who were designated Hollywood Deb Stars of 1966. By the summer, she became Miss Golden Globe of 1966 and assisted Andy Williams in the presentation of the Golden Globe Awards. In 1966, she was voted as honorary mayor of Studio City, California. Miller made many appearances in other television series, including Flipper, Leave It to Beaver, Our Man Higgins, and The Donna Reed Show.

Original monochrome picture HERE
Circa 1965
 

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Cheryl Miller (born February 4, 1943)...playing Paula Tracy alongside Thompson in the CBS television series, Daktari, (1966–69).
Daktari was one of my favourite TV series, not least because of the opening theme music. Plus, you won't see too many actresses riding a full-grown male lion!

 
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