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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
Models Wanda Delafield and Peggy Lloyd New-York, 1946.
Peggy Lloyd (on the right) was born on April 15, 1925 in Los Angeles, California, USA as Gloria Gabrielle Freeman. She was given up for adoption by her unmarried mother and was adopted at five years of age by the famous comedian Harold Lloyd, one of the wealthiest men in Hollywood. Lloyd and his wife Mildred changed her name to Marjorie Elizabeth Lloyd. She lived the high life as Lloyd’s daughter – she was chauffeured to school in a limo, and the family lived in the fabulous Lloyd estate (Green Acres, one of the first mansions in Beverly Hills) that had it’s own nine hole golf course and an Olympic sized pool. In 1930, after the kidnapping of the Lindbergh baby, Lloyd became paranoid about the safety of his own children. They were protected around the clock by two armed guards.

Despite the family’s wealth, Peggy wanted to work and carve her own mark on the world. Being a very beautiful woman, it was only natural that she try her hand in modeling. Soon, Peggy was all over the papers, modeling clothes and advertising for this and that. She was featured on the cover of Life Magazine in May 1943 -----> https://i.imgur.com/FIyaPeq.jpg On the same year she landed a role in the movie Cover girl (a now classic Rita Hayworth/Gene Kelly Technicolor musical) and started her career in Hollywood, the town where she was practically royalty. As Harold Lloyd’s daughter, Peggy was very active socially. She knew everybody who was somebody from the movie colony, and was a good friend with Charlie Chaplin and his last wife Oona. Peggy also gave many soirees at her home in San Fernando Valley, hosting many famous people. She later became a publicist and refused all help from Harold for financial support. She candidly told a reported that “I am over 21 and mom and dad are not responsible for my mistakes.” Bravo for Peggy! A very down to earth, normal millionaire’s daughter! Peggy later worked in a variety of other jobs: as a talent scout for a radio DJ, restaurant hostess and bookkeeper for an advertising agency.

At 47 Peggy tried to find her birth mother, as reported by the Los Angeles Times. This started a trend in the papers, where adopted children sought the truth about their birth parents. She was succesful in finding and meeting her birth mother, then known as Dorothy Callison. Peggy Lloyd died on November 18, 1986, from lung cancer.

Original monochrome picture here https://i.imgur.com/tiiCXyX.jpg





Santa Carling, 1984, in Marie Claire Magazine
I love this photograph but unfortunately the original black and white and only copy on the web was in pretty bad shape. So it was, for me, worth the effort to make it come back to life. At first I thought the original was unsalvageable, and my first try two months ago was a disaster, but I finally managed to do it. On top of colorizing it, I was forced to patch the sweater, the floor and the fireplace with samples from external pictures. That was the only way to restore it properly.

Carling Bassett was born in Toronto into a family considered like royalty in Canada. Her mother, Susan Carling Bassett came from a famous Canadian family. Her great, great grandfather, Sir John Carling was a prominent figure in Canada’s Confederation and her great grandfather was the founder of the Carling Brewery. Her father, John F. Bassett, was from the well-known Toronto family that had an interest for local media and sports teams. He had also owned the Tampa Bay Bandits of the United States Football League and was a player on the Canadian Davis Cup team in 1959.

It was because of her father that Carling showed interest in tennis. As a young girl her results were anything but good but it all changed after she entered the Bollettieri Academy (IMG). She quickly became one of the best juniors in the world. She didn't stay in juniors very long because she started her professional career at 15. By age 16, Bassett was Canada's top tennis player and later that year (1983) was named WTA newcomer of the year. At the same time, she had a successful second career as a fashion model, working for the world-famous Ford modeling agency. She also dabbled in acting, being promoted as one of the stars of a 1982 teen comedy film Spring Fever, and later appearing in a 1984 episode of The Littlest Hobo.

She was the first Canadian to ever reach the Semi Finals of a Gran Slam (Us Open 1984), losing to Chris Evert who went on to lose the Finale to Navratilova. Her Highest ranking was #8 (4 March 1985). But her peak years were soon coming to an end. Her motivation to be a Top professional tennis player suddenly disappeared when her beloved father died at the worst possible time in May 1986. He was the reason she became a tennis player and the driving force that motivated her to be her best. She also struggled with the eating disorder bulimia, characterized by eating a large amount of food in a short amount of time, then to get rid of the food consumed by vomiting or taking laxatives. She managed to maintain her weight in the latter stages of her career but her stamina surely suffered from the bulimia to the point that her ranking plummeted out of the Top 100 in 1988 and after giving birth to a second child, out of the Top 300 in 1992. At that point she decided to retire. Shortly after, Bassett and Chris Evert, built a now famous tennis academy in Boca Raton, Florida. Once again, Bassett threw herself into tennis, this time on the teaching end.

Original Monochrome picture here https://i.imgur.com/QBfGCaD.jpg





A recent one for a change. Romanian model and actress Iulia Cirstea in the May 2014 Marie Claire Magazine, Netherlands edition. It was published only in black & white. MARIE CLAIRE NETHERLANDS: Iulia Cirstea in ?Wat N Match? by Photographer Hans Van Brakel ? Image Amplified

YAS Girl. To play tennis in high heels is a great idea. :eek:h:

Original monochrome picture here https://i.imgur.com/WaOfwZP.jpg

 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
June 22, 1973 Billie Jean King resting on a park bench, in Kensington Gardens, London. She had confirmed the night before, after a long debate, that there would be no women boycott of Wimbledon.

PS: I'm very happy about how well the worn out park bench turned out. That could take hours but it's actually quickly done, thanks to a setting in the layer's blending mode of Photoshop that allows one color (green), to blend mostly on the darker tones, and on another layer a lighter color can blend mostly on the lighter tones of the bench.

Original monochrome image here https://i.imgur.com/rhMLjen.jpg






A scene from "Le Train Bleu", a 1924 ballet and "operette" performed by "Les Ballet Russes" at the Champs Elysées Theater in Paris. It was a burlesque parody of what the new society of the 1920s had become.

Gabrielle (Coco) Chanel created the sportswear worn by the performers, perhaps to promote her clothing line called "Coco Chanel’s athletic costumes" (but in French obviously). The sports outfits of the production included Golf, Tennis and Bathing suits. The story was from Jean Cocteau inspired by something he wrote years before. The very famous Pablo Picasso painted the grand drape or front curtain---> https://i.imgur.com/Gs9ZSU7.jpg

The 1924 Ballet has been re-staged by the Paris Opera in 2010. You can find a 5 minutes sample on Youtube if you're curious.

Original monochrome picture here https://i.imgur.com/DnKsYJ4.jpg

 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
Yes... They are vintage already, Hingis and Kournikova. This was from 1999, in the 20th century.
The image can only be found in Black & White, as far as I know. It's funny how many pictures of them hugging and kissing there are. The reason is they were often playing doubles together and winning as often.

Original picture here https://i.imgur.com/6yFURpY.jpg

 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
Unidentified model waving and smiling, holding tennis racquet. - 1939
Obviously one of a multitude of pin-up pictures from the era. This outfit is nice, but was way too sexy for playing tennis in 1939, and she isn't wearing a bra. #outrageous :eek:h:

Original monochrome picture here https://i.imgur.com/CAUIKOG.jpg





1920 - Irish-born American silent movie actress Eileen Percy all dressed up for a scene in the film The Husband Hunter. She appeared in 68 films between 1917 and 1933, but she was one of those stars whose voice didn't translate well into sound. She made only a few sound pictures.

Original monochrome picture here https://i.imgur.com/5LDzzCj.jpg

 

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Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
Sarah Palfrey Cooke (September 18, 1912 – February 27, 1996) was an American tennis player whose career spanned two decades from the late 1920s until the late 1940s. She won the singles title at the U.S. Championships in 1941 and 1945 and won 16 Slams in women's doubles (11) and mixed doubles (5).

Palfrey is one of the few women, if not the sole woman, to appear on a top-level male championship honor roll. Because of the manpower crisis during World War II, she and second husband Elwood Cooke were permitted in 1945 to enter the men's doubles of the Tri-State Championships in Cincinnati.

Palfrey and Marble lobbied the USLTA to remove the color bar and allow Althea Gibson to play at heretofore whites-only tournaments beginning in 1950. "She [Palfrey] was calmly persuasive, had clout as an ex-champ, and got Althea into the U.S. Championships in 1950," said Gladys Heldman, founder of the Women's Professional Tennis Tour.

Original monochrome image here https://i.imgur.com/m2FKwkw.jpg

The picture bellow was shot for LIFE magazine in 1946 by photographer Tony Linck.





Lea Pericoli (born 22 March 1935) is a former tennis player and later television presenter and journalist from Milan. She reached the last sixteen of the French Open two times and the Wimbledon Championships three times, and is also famous for her choice of clothing.

In 1955, Pericoli played at the Wimbledon Championships wearing clothes designed by Ted Tinling. Her clothing generated so much interest in later years, that it was kept secret until her appearances on the court. In particular, her fur-lined clothing worn at the 1964 Wimbledon Championships caught the attention of observers.

In 2001, the Sunday Mirror quoted Pericoli as saying "I became famous because of my clothes, not my playing." and "I didn't make any money from tennis, but if I'd been born 30 years later I would have become terribly rich like Anna Kournikova".

Side Note: This is probably the sexiest and earliest tennis up-skirt photo from the mid 20th century. It all started in 1949 when the "naughty" Gussie Moran dared to wear frilly lace panties at Wimbledon. The officials went mad about this outrage, but in the end she became an instant celebrity because of that event. Life magazine gave her the nickname Gorgeous Gussie and she was an attraction for dozens of photographers scrambling at court level to get a low angle shot worth a lot of money. Lea Pericoli was dressed by the same designer Ted Tinling, and she obviously didn't mind the interest of most photographers for her fancy outfits and undies rather than her tennis. Boys will be boys :shrug:

Original monochrome image from 1955 here https://i.imgur.com/8F7J3cS.jpg





Virginia Wade (born 10 July 1945) was tennis player from Great Britain. She won three Grand Slam singles championships and four Grand Slam doubles championships, and is the only British woman in history to have won titles at all four Grand Slam tournaments. She was ranked as high as No. 2 in the world in singles, and No. 1 in the world in doubles.

Three times a Grand Slam singles champion, her most famous success was winning Wimbledon on 1 July 1977, the 16th time in which Wade had played at Wimbledon. It was the tournament's centenary year, and the year of the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II (the Queen attended Wimbledon for the first time since 1962 to watch the final). Wade was the last British tennis player to have won a Grand Slam singles tournament until Andy Murray won the US Open in 2012. She remains the most recent British woman to have won a Grand Slam singles title. After retiring from competitive tennis, she coached for four years and has also worked as a tennis commentator and game analyst for the BBC and Eurosport.

She was ranked in the world's top 10 continuously from 1967 to 1979. Her career spanned a total of 26 years. She retired from singles competition at the end of the 1985 tennis season, and then from doubles at the end of 1986. The 26 times that Wade played at Wimbledon is an all-time record, 24 of those times being in the women's singles.

Original monochrome picture from 1968 here https://i.imgur.com/nEGUAHP.jpg

 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
Jeanne Matthey (25 January 1886 – 24 November 1980) was a French tennis player. She competed during the first two decades of the 20th century. Matthey won the French Open Women's Singles Championship four times in succession from 1909 to 1912, but lost the 1913 final.

No sooner had Jeanne reached the peak of her powers that her career was curtailed by the outbreak of the First World War. Whereas her life had to this point been taken up with tournaments and family engagements, she decided to leave the courts behind her and volunteer as a Red Cross nurse.
After spending four years at the front, during which time she became a head nurse, Jeanne returned to Paris on suffering serious wounds to her right arm, which would prevent her from holding a racquet and playing tennis again. She had, in any case, decided to devote her life to helping others and lived out her principles by playing an active role in the Second World War, forming part of a resistance network in which she had the task of relaying messages.
Caught and tortured by the Gestapo, Jeanne refused to give her captors any information and was sent to a concentration camp in Germany. Though she survived the ordeal, the ill treatment she suffered during her internment left her much weakened.

In 1972, on being spotted at Roland-Garros, Jeanne laughed as she told reporters, “I’m in little bits!”. She went on to tell them that she was a member of more than 30 war veterans’ organisations and that she had received more than 38 medals and decorations since the end of the First World War.
Named a knight and an officer of the French Legion of Honour in 1952 and 1958 respectively, she is one of the few women to have been promoted to the rank of commander of the Legion of Honour, a decoration bestowed upon her in 1962.
Jeanne Matthey is more than just a four-time French Open champion. Behind that fabled name is the story of a truly unique woman, a hero of her time, and a figure who played her part in history.

Original monochrome picture Here





Jean Harlow (March 3, 1911 – June 7, 1937) was an American film actress and sex symbol of the 1930's. She was one of the biggest movie stars in the world at the time. Often nicknamed the "Blonde Bombshell" and the "Platinum Blonde," she was popular for her "Laughing Vamp" movie persona. Harlow's popularity rivaled and soon surpassed that of MGM colleagues Joan Crawford and Norma Shearer. The American Film Institute ranked Jean Harlow as the 22nd greatest female star of classic Hollywood cinema.
Harlow sadly died too young, at age 26 during the filming of MGM's Saratoga (1937). She had had several re-occurrence of influenza before the shooting. A serious illness in those days. The cause of death was given as cerebral edema, a complication of kidney failure. During her agony her body was bloated for she couldn't urinate at all. The studio was able to complete the film by using body doubles and it was released a little over a month after Harlow's death.

She loved playing tennis. There are several pictures of her posing with a racquet or on a court playing. This picture in my opinion is the nicest of the lot.

Circa 1930
Original monochrome picture HERE

177633
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
A short documentary about picture colorization. Very interesting and well done.



The video bellow is a simplified explanation of how it's basically done in Photoshop.
It's pretty much how I do it after some tweaking and restoring of the original monochrome image.
It can take just a few minutes for a very simple picture, but up to a whole day of work for a more complex photo with many colors to add.
Sometimes I like to import and paste in a better looking sky from another image or anything else that can make the end result nicer.


Note: Adobe Photoshop CS2 is FREE. https://www.techspot.com/downloads/3689-adobe-photoshop-cs2.html (for MacOS and Windows)
Adobe was offering it for free on its servers for a while a couple of years ago. After they stopped, some other sites have continued to let people download it. Adobe doesn't care because it acts like an entry level demo sort of, and anyhow their key validation server for CS2 is long gone and none of its online features work anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
Robert Young with his girlfriend Karen Morley in 1932.

Karen Morley (December 12, 1909 – March 8, 2003) was an American film actress. She started as a stage actress but she got lucky when an important film director of the early 30s saw in her a perfect stand-in for Greta Garbo in screen tests. This led to a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and many roles in big budget movies of the early 30s. Her career came to an end in 1947, when she testified before the House Un-American Activities Committee and refused to answer questions about her alleged American Communist Party membership. After being blacklisted in Hollywood by the studio bosses, she was never able to rebuild her acting career.

Robert Young (February 22, 1907 – July 21, 1998) was an American film, television, and radio actor, best known for two major leading roles. As Jim Anderson, the father character in Father Knows Best, which actually started as a radio show in 1949 but became a TV show from 1954 to 1960; ShoutFactoryTV : Watch full episodes of Father Knows Best

and as the Medical Doctor Marcus Welby in Marcus Welby, M.D. (1969 to 76). In those days there were only a few TV chanels to chose from, so when a TV show was popular, the whole world knew about it and watched it, either in English or dubbed in a foreign language. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKzUhboH4hEF9ZfjCq4LF-w

Before his Television roles he appeared in over 100 films, B movies from MGM. As an MGM contract player, Young was obligated to accept any film assigned to him or risk being placed on suspension, and many actors who were placed on suspension were prohibited from earning a salary from any endeavor at all, even those unrelated to the film industry.

Original monochrome picture from 1932 here https://i.imgur.com/C0mMP1V.jpg





And as a bonus today, this restoration (not a colorization) of a beautiful image of a very photogenic teenager posing at the net holding a Spalding racquet. Circa 1950.

 

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Discussion Starter #32 (Edited)
Stella Stevens (born Estelle Eggleston; October 1, 1938) is an American film, television, and stage actress. At age 16, she married electrician Noble Herman Stephens. They had one child. The couple divorced in 1957. Throughout the late 1950s and 1960s Stevens achieved success as a model. In January 1960, she was Playboy magazine's Playmate of the Month. She was included in Playboy magazine's 100 Sexiest Stars of the 20th Century, appearing at number 27. During the 1960s she was one of the most photographed women in the world. Unfortunately she is now in a long-term Alzheimer's care facility in Los Angeles.

Original monochrome photograph from 1963 here https://i.imgur.com/YlhDZkE.jpg





I couldn't resist to restore this wonderful portrait of Stella. Both photo shoots were done at the time of the Jerry Lewis movie The Nutty Professor (1963).

(not a colorization)




Suzanne Lenglen (24 May 1899 – 4 July 1938) was a French tennis player. Building off her status as the youngest major champion (15) in tennis history, Lenglen's unusual graceful style of play and exuberant personality made her one of tennis's biggest stars in the 1920s. Often playing in front of sell-out crowds and appearing on the front pages of newspapers for her biggest matches, she is regarded by some as the first female athlete to become a global sport celebrity. Lenglen was ranked No. 1 in the world from 1921 through 1926, winning 8 Grand Slam singles titles and 21 in total. She also won 10 World Championship titles across all disciplines. Unsatisfied with her lack of income, she forfeited her amateur status and became the first women's tennis player to turn professional. Lenglen has been ranked by the Tennis Channel as the greatest women's tennis player from the amateur era.

After World War I delayed her career for four years, Lenglen returned to competitive tennis in 1919 and won her Wimbledon debut in a classic final that finished as the second-longest in history by games played. Following the war, she was relatively unchallenged, only losing one match and ending her amateur career on a 181-match winning streak. She often won her matches by lopsided scores and never lost more than three games in a set in any of her 12 major singles finals apart from her first final at Wimbledon.
Overall, Lenglen won six Wimbledon singles titles, including five in a row from 1919 through 1923, and also won triple crowns at the first two open French Championships in 1925 and 1926. Her only post-war loss came in a retirement against Molla Mallory in her only amateur match in the United States. Lenglen also had prolific careers in doubles and mixed doubles. She was undefeated with her regular doubles partner Elizabeth Ryan, highlighted by another six titles at Wimbledon. One of Lenglen's highest-profile matches towards the end of her career was her victory over Helen Wills in the Match of the Century, their only career meeting. Following a misunderstanding at Wimbledon in 1926, Lenglen abruptly retired from amateur tennis, signing to headline a five-month professional tour in the United States beginning later that year.

Lenglen had a versatile all-court game. Her longtime doubles partner Elizabeth Ryan described her style of play as, "[Lenglen] owned every kind of shot, plus a genius for knowing how and when to use them. She never gave an opponent the same kind of shot twice in a row. She’d make you run miles... her game was all placement and deception and steadiness. I had the best drop shot anybody ever had, but she could not only get up to it but was so fast that often she could score a placement off it." Her rivals Molla Mallory and Helen Wills also both noted that Lenglen excelled at extending rallies and could take control of points with defensive shots. Although Lenglen built her game around control rather than power, she had the ability to hit powerful shots.

In June 1938 Lenglen was diagnosed with leukemia and only three weeks later, she went blind. In early July 1938, the French press announced that Lenglen had suddenly become extremely fatigued and a few days later she died of pernicious anemia on 4 July 1938. During her career, Lenglen won 83 singles titles, nine of which were achieved without losing a single game. In addition, she won 74 doubles titles and 93 mixed doubles titles. She won the Wimbledon singles, women's doubles, and mixed doubles championships in the same year on three separate occasions (1920, 1922, and 1925).


1924 Original unrestored monochrome picture here https://i.imgur.com/YZq4t2H.jpg

 

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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
The Original Nine, on September 23rd 49 years ago.

From left to right, Top Row: Valerie Ziegenfuss, Billie Jean King, Nancy Richey, Peaches Bartkowicz.
Bottom Row: Judy Tegart Dalton, Kerry Melville Reid, Rosie Casals, Gladys Heldman, Kristy Pigeon.


Source: https://www.wtatennis.com/news/looking-back-original-nine

Three years before the Battle of the Sexes, WTA founder Billie Jean King was one of nine courageous women out to take stand for equal rights in tennis.
The Amateur Era had come to an end, and though Open tennis had just begun, the troubles were hardly over for even the top women in the game.

"I didn't have any idea we were going to get different prize money," King said in an interview for the PBS documentary American Masters. King won the first Open Era Wimbledon Championships alongside Rod Laver, who earned £2000 in prize money to King's £750. "I thought it was totally unfair."

Disparate prize money was only the tip of the iceberg. As the men's game continued to grow, fewer women's events were being held alongside them, leaving fewer opportunities for women to succeed as professional tennis players.

"We were in big trouble if we wanted to keep playing tennis."

King enlisted the help of Rosie Casals and Nancy Richey, who accompanied her to speak with Gladys Heldman, publisher of World Tennis Magazine and mother to pro Julie Heldman. They wanted to boycott an event to be held after the 1970 US Open, one that leveled prize money 12:1 against the women competing. Heldman decided to go beyond passive resistence and urged the women to start a tour of their own; a tournament was organized in Texas.

"She knew how to get a sponsor, she had great connections," said Valerie Ziegenfuss, one of the nine players who signed up for the Houston Women's Invitational.

Looking to stop the revolution that was quickly unfolding, the USTA - then known as the United States Lawn Tennis Association - threatened to suspend anyone who planned to play this one-off event. Many of the top players stayed away, but nine women were undeterred. King, Casals, Richey, Heldman, and Ziegenfuss were joined by Judy Dalton, Kerry Melville Reid, Peaches Bartkowicz, and Kristy Pigeon, all of whom signed onto what would become the Virginia Slims Circuit for one dollar.

"We weren't sure about our destiny but we knew it was in our hands for the first time," King recalled.

Casals went on to win the tournament in Houston, but women everywhere won a whole lot more. The Virginia Slims Circuit became the WTA in 1973, and the world of women's sports would never be the same.


Original monochrome picture here https://i.imgur.com/wXOwpq9.jpg
As usual, all colors are a total guess. It's my take on this historical event.

 

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The Original Nine, on September 23rd 49 years ago.

...


As usual, all colors are a total guess. It's my take on this historical event.
wonderful colorization, nothing seems wrong
 
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Discussion Starter #35
Helen Wills (October 6, 1905 – January 1, 1998), also known as Helen Wills Moody and Helen Wills Roark, was an American tennis player. She became famous around the world for holding the top position in women's tennis for a total of nine years: 1927–33, 1935 and 1938. She won 31 Grand Slam tournament titles (singles, women's doubles, and mixed doubles) during her career, including 19 singles titles and she also won two Olympic gold medals in Paris in 1924 (singles and doubles). Wills remained an avid tennis player into her 80s. In 1998, she bequeathed $10 million to the University of California, Berkeley to fund the establishment of a Neuroscience institute. The resulting institute, the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, began in 1999 and is now home to more than 40 faculty researchers and 36 graduate students.

Wills was the first American woman athlete to become a global celebrity, making friends with royalty and film stars despite her preference for staying out of the limelight. She was admired for her graceful physique and for her fluid motion. She was part of a new tennis fashion, playing in knee-length pleated skirts rather than the longer ones of her predecessors. Unusually, she practiced against men to hone her craft. She served and volleyed with unusually powerful forehand and backhand strokes, and she forced her opponents out of position by placing deep shots left and right. Playing Wills was, according to Helen Jacobs, like playing "a machine... with implacable concentration and undeniable skill" yet with little flexibility. Charlie Chaplin was once asked what he considered to be the most beautiful sight that he had ever seen. He responded that it was "the movement of Helen Wills playing tennis".

Her record of eight wins at Wimbledon was not surpassed until 1990 when Martina Navratilova won nine. She was said to be "arguably the most dominant tennis player of the 20th century", and has been called by some (including Jack Kramer, Harry Hopman, Mercer Beasley, Don Budge, and AP News) the greatest female player in history.

Wills painted all her life, giving exhibitions of her paintings and etchings in New York galleries. She personally drew all of the illustrations in her book "Tennis". Helen Wills Moody Roark - Artist, Fine Art Prices, Auction Records for Helen Wills Moody Roark

Original monochrome picture here https://i.imgur.com/r3ofLqP.jpg




And here is a restored/recolorized image of a 1938 magazine cover. Original here https://i.imgur.com/bljxefK.jpg

 

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Discussion Starter #36 (Edited)
This woman, wearing the latest tennis style for 1931, would not look entirely out of place on today’s courts. As a matter of fact only the racquet would be considered obsolete or a museum piece now. The type and style of sneakers she is wearing, with that distinctive round ankle patch, are actually still sold today. Nike sues over iconic Converse sneakers, but who exactly is Chuck Taylor? - The Business Journals
In 1917 Converse produced it at first just for basketball, called Converse All-Stars. In 1923, an Indiana hoops star named Chuck Taylor endorsed the shoes, and they became known as Chuck Taylor All-Stars. These are the best-selling basketball shoes of all time (one billion sold). Of course using those today to play tennis wouldn't be the best choice but back in time 80+ years ago it was a great sneaker to play tennis, basketball and many other sports.

The racquet she's holding was actually already old for the 1930s. That type of wooden racquet had been around for decades already. It was basically made of two pieces of wood. One roughly five foot long bent into shape with ammonia or steam, coming together over the center piece of wood to form the handle. Shortly after that date, the use of laminated wood allowed tennis racquets to evolve. But it was still quite heavy and all wooden racquets needed to be stored with a wooden or metallic bracket, solidly fixed on the head part to prevent it from deforming under the string's tension over time.

Original monochrome picture HERE

 

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Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)
Beautiful teen model posing looking through her racquet in 1950.

Original monochrome picture HERE

177632





Pamelyn Ferdin (13) posing for a press photographer doing a newspaper article about her in 1972. The building in the background is the Griffith Observatory in L.A., sitting on the south-facing slope of Mount Hollywood, to the South-East of the Hollywood Sign. In the very popular video game GTA 5, the Galileo Observatory is nearly an exact replication of LA's Griffith Observatory, a popular location, featured in many epic movies 8 Films Where LA's Griffith Observatory Plays a Pivotal Role

Born February 4th, 1959, she is an American animal rights activist and a former child actress. If you grew up in the 60s and 70s, you have undoubtedly seen her countless times on TV and a few movies. She was in 250 TV Shows & Movies and more than 300 TV commercials. Bill Mumy and her were definitly the most busy child actors of that era until they outgrew it. There were times when she was the busiest actor of any age.
Her WebSite Pamelyn

The list of major TV shows she appeared on is impressive: Star Trek, Bewitched, Green Acres, I Dream of Jeannie, The Andy Griffith Show, Daniel Boone, The Odd Couple, The Monkees, The Flying Nun, Gunsmoke, Mannix, The Brady Bunch, Family Affair, Marcus Welby, CHiPS, Lassie, The Littlest Hobo and many more, including the voice of Lucy in Charlie Brown three times.

Her best movie role in my opinion, was in a pretty good Clint Eastwood movie titled The Beguiled. But it was a flop at the Box-Office unfortunately. In that movie it was seen as very controversial that she was kissed on the lips by Eastwood. She was only 11 when the scene was shot. She could have become a much more famous movie star if she had been chosen to be the main character of The Exorcist, but the producers thought her face was too familiar to the public. They preferred to cast a relatively unknown teen actress with a similar look, Linda Blair.

Original monochrome picture HERE

 

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pretty cool thread :)
 
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Discussion Starter #40 (Edited)
Helen H. Jacobs (August 6, 1908 – June 2, 1997) was an American tennis player who won nine Grand Slam titles and was an eleven-time Grand Slam singles runner-up. Six of those losses were to Helen Wills Moody. Jacobs's only victory over Wills Moody was in the final of the 1933 U.S. Championships. Wills Moody retired from the match with a back injury while trailing 0-3 in the third set to a chorus of boos from the audience who believed that Wills Moody quit the match merely to deny Jacobs the satisfaction of finishing out her victory. Jacobs almost defeated Moody again when she had match point at 6–3, 3–6, 5–3 in the 1935 Wimbledon Championships singles final but a mishit on a short lob, which she decided to let bounce, cost her the point and four games later the match.

In 1933, Jacobs became the first woman to break with tradition by wearing man-tailored shorts at Wimbledon. Long known to have been lesbian, she was in a relationship from 1934 to 1943 with Henrietta Bingham, daughter of Louisville publisher and ambassador to England Robert Bingham. Jacobs served as a commander in the U.S. Navy intelligence during World War II, one of only five women to achieve that rank in the Navy. While she was still playing tennis, Jacobs became a writer. In 1949, she published Gallery of Champions, a collection of biographies of female players, which she dedicated to Molla Mallory. Jacobs died of heart failure in East Hampton, New York on June 2, 1997, where she had been living.

NOTE: I was almost finished when I noticed the thumb of her right hand looked like a circumcised male organ. :ROFLMAO: I don't know if that's a coincidence or if that was the work of some wiseguy made as a joke. That's an awful curse for a lesbian to have that in her hand for eternity on the Internet. :lol: Anyhow I replaced the thumb and won't post here the monochrome original, but you can find it on Google Image if you're curious.

From July 1935

 
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