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Discussion Starter #1
This thread was started to talk about coaching changes in Division 1 women's tennis.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Denver's coach Amy Jensen resigns

DENVER – University of Denver women’s tennis head coach Amy Jensen has resigned after three seasons, Vice Chancellor for Athletics and Recreation and Ritchie Center Operations Peg Bradley-Doppes announced today.

Jensen posted a 53-18 mark with one Sun Belt Conference championship and back-to-back NCAA Tournament appearances (2008 and 2009) during her three-year tenure at DU.

"I would like to thank the University of Denver for the opportunity to guide the women's tennis program over the last three years,” Jensen said. “Our girls have done an incredible job of taking this program to the next level. I am very proud of their efforts. I would also like to collectively thank the DU Athletics and Recreation staff. The success of our women's tennis program would not possible without incredible team support."

Jensen was named SBC Women’s Tennis Coach of the Year in 2008 after leading DU to its finest season with a 23-3 record, Sun Belt Conference championship and NCAA Tournament appearance. The Pioneers advanced to the second round of the NCAA Tournament, marking its highest showing ever for NCAA Division I tennis, and reached a program-high No. 19 ranking.

This season, Jensen earned her second coach of the year honor after guiding DU to a second-place SBC finish. Denver (16-6) advanced to the NCAA Tournament, but was eliminated by No. 21 Mississippi, 4-1, in the first round of the Georgia Tech Regional.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Denver hires new coach Jeremy Wurtzman

DENVER – Jeremy Wurtzman has been named head coach of the University of Denver women’s tennis program, Vice Chancellor for Athletics and Recreation and Ritchie Center Operations Peg Bradley-Doppes announced today. Wurtzman was an assistant coach for the DU men’s program from 2006-08 and at his alma mater Ohio State in 2008-09.

“We are really fortunate to bring Jeremy back to DU to lead our women’s program as head coach,” Bradley-Doppes said. “Jeremy helped the Ohio State men’s program reach the NCAA finals last season and did a great job assisting coach Danny Westerman in elevating our men’s program to the national scene. Jeremy is a rising star in the coaching profession and we welcome him back to DU.”

Wurtzman helped Ohio State to the Big Ten regular-season championship, Big Ten Tournament title and NCAA finals appearance against USC in 2008-09. He coached Bryan Koniecko to the ITA National Indoor title, and Ohio State achieved its highest team ranking of No. 2 in school history last season.

Wurtzman was an assistant coach under Westerman for two seasons. The Pioneers qualified for their first NCAA Tournament in Wurtzman’s second season in 2007-08. DU also achieved its highest team ranking of No. 37 and produced its first All-American in Adam Holmstrom. DU went 31-14 during Wurtzman’s two seasons and Westerman earned two Sun Belt Conference men’s coach of the year accolades.

“I am extremely excited and grateful to rejoin the University of Denver as head coach of the women’s tennis program,” Wurtzman said. “I want to personally thank Peg Bradley-Doppes for this incredible opportunity. I will work passionately and tirelessly to recruit and develop student-athletes that can help DU win conference championships and achieve national success. My wife, Gretchen, and I are looking forward to returning to DU and the Mile High City of Denver.”

Wurtzman joined the coaching ranks after a stellar playing career at Ohio State. He earned All-America honors and was the ITA National Senior Player of the Year in 2004. The three-time All-Big Ten selection was the ITA National Indoor champion in 2003. Wurtzman achieved a No. 3 final ranking in the 2003-04 season.

Wurtzman replaces Amy Jensen, who resigned on May 13. He will begin his duties as head coach of the DU women’s tennis program on July 1.
 

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This thread was started to talk about coaching changes in Division 1 women's tennis.
I noticed the Princeton women's Coach resigned a couple weeks ago. This was way over do. This team gets more American talent then any team in the country and this year was their first trip to NCAA's. By far the most under achieving college team in the country!
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Princeton's coach Kathy Sell steps down

Thanks for the update johnnytennis. :worship:


6/17/09

Women's Tennis Coach Kathy Sell to Leave Princeton

PRINCETON -- Less than two months after leading Princeton's women's tennis team to its first Ivy League title and NCAA tournament berth in nine years, head coach Kathy Sell has elected to step down and relocate for personal reasons to the state of North Carolina where her boyfriend and most of her nuclear family resides.

Sell, a native of Moorestown, N.J., had a record of 63-41 in her five years on the job. Prior to Princeton, Sell was an assistant coach at Oregon after graduating from Duke in 2001 as the university's Outstanding Scholar-Athlete her senior year.

"While it certainly hasn't been an easy decision to step away from my position at Princeton, I am very excited to move closer to loved ones in North Carolina," Sell said. "I have thought about this for quite some time and on a personal level, I am ready to move forward with my life. Princeton has afforded me an excellent coaching education and incredible relationships with student-athletes who I will continue to follow and support. I am proud of the accomplishments of the tennis program over the past five years and I know with certainty that this team will continue to improve and will maintain the standard of excellence that is consistent with Princeton University. Gary Walters has given great support both to me and my program and I have no doubt that under his leadership, Princeton will attract an incredible new coach."

Walters in turn stated that "Kathy has been a terrific coach and ambassador for Princeton tennis. Our student-athletes and the athletic department are indebted to her for her significant contributions to the over-all quality of our athletic program. We wish her well as she moves on to the next exciting phase of her life."

Princeton's national search for a new women's tennis mentor will begin immediately.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Re: Princeton's coach Kathy Sell steps down

Here's part of an article mentioning Kathy Sell.


Courtesy: USTA

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., June 11, 2009 -- The USTA announced today that 24 of the nation's top men's and women's collegiate tennis players have been named to the 2009 USTA Summer Collegiate Team, administered by the USTA and the Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA).

The USTA Summer Collegiate Team is an elite training program for the top American collegiate tennis players that began in 1996 and is funded by the USTA. It is designed to provide college players with valuable exposure to the USTA Pro Circuit in a team-oriented environment during the summer months.

In addition to competing on the USTA Pro Circuit, USTA Player Development will host two Pro Tour Transition camps – one for the men, one for the women – for the selected players. The men’s camp will be held June 20-23 in Boca Raton, Fla., while the women’s camp will be conducted July 6-9 in Atlanta.

With both the men’s and women’s teams increasing from six to twelve players, each team will this year have two coaches. Amanda Augustus, Head Coach of Women’s Tennis at the University of California and Kathy Sell, Head Coach of Women’s Tennis at Princeton University, will coach the women’s team, while Chris Brandi, Assistant Coach of Men’s Tennis at Wake Forest University, and Tony Bresky, Associate Head Coach of Men’s Tennis at the University of Virginia, will be coaching the men's team.

Women’s Team

Hilary Barte, Stanford (SO, Chatsworth, Calif.)
Lindsay Burdette, Stanford (JR, Jackson, Ga.)
Mallory Cecil, Duke (FR, Spartanburg, S.C.)
Julia Cohen, Miami (SO, Philadelphia)
Irina Falconi, Georgia Tech (FR, Jupiter, Fla.)
Amanda Fink, Southern California (SR, Calabasas, Calif.)
Amanda McDowell, Georgia Tech (JR, Atlanta)
Kelcy McKenna, Arizona State (SO, North Bend, Ore.)
Maria Sanchez, Southern California (SO, Modesto, Calif.)
Yasmin Schnack, UCLA (JR, Sacramento, Calif.)
Kelcy Tefft, Notre Dame (SR, Enid, Okla.)
Caitlin Whoriskey, Tennessee (JR, East Sandwich, Mass.)
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Utah Valley State adds womens tennis for 2010

Utah Valley St. Announces Plan for Tennis Programs

The UVS men's tennis team will begin play in 2009, and the women are scheduled to start in 2010.

June 3, 2008

Utah Valley State announced on Tuesday a plan to add both men's and women's tennis to its list of NCAA Division I programs, taking the total number at the university to 17.

The process of adding both programs is expected to take a total of three years with the men's program set to begin competition in the fall of the 2009-10 season and the women's program slated to start competing in the fall of the 2010-11 season.

"The addition of tennis to our athletics department is important for our progress as a Division I institution," Utah Valley St. Director of Athletics, Mike Jacobsen said. "We're excited to be able to offer more student-athletes an opportunity to compete and get a quality education here at UVS."
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Navy adds tennis for 2009-10

Naval Academy Director of Athletics Chet Gladchuk announced that women's tennis will be elevated from a club to a varsity sport in the fall of 2009 and that 2007 Mid-Atlantic Coach of the Year Keith Puryear will serve as the head coach.

"Coach Puryear brings to our midshipmen a wealth of successful experience and documented winning ways," said Naval Academy Director of Athletics Chet Gladchuk. "Meeting him is to be immediately impressed. Everyone is very enthusiastic about Keith joining the academy family. His philosophies resonate the fundamental values and academic aspirations of our programs and his expect to win mindset will be just what we need to jumpstart our new varsity women's tennis program."

"I would like to thank Chet Gladchuk for giving me the opportunity to start the women's tennis program at the Naval Academy," said Puryear. "I know the rich history of Navy athletics, so it is an honor to be given this opportunity. I am looking forward to the challenges presented by all of the schools in the Patriot League. My staff and I will work hard to develop a program that is successful and is one that all can be proud of. In addition, I would like to thank Deputy Athletic Director, Eric Ruden, Head Men's Tennis Coach, John Officer, Professor Christine Copper and Associate Athletic Director, Robb Dunn, for all their help in my transition to the Naval Academy."

Puryear has won 443 matches and 10 conference coach-of-the-year honors over the last decade as the head men's and women's coach at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). His men's teams have appeared in five NCAA Tournaments (2000-2003, 2007), while the women have also made five trips (1999-2003) to the NCAA tournament.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Texas Tech hires new coach Todd Petty

Todd Petty Named Women's Tennis Coach

Petty served as interim head coach for the 2008-09 season

April 30, 2009

LUBBOCK, Texas - Texas Tech Athletics Director Gerald Myers has announced the hiring of Todd Petty as the head women's tennis coach. Petty served as interim head coach for the Lady Raiders during the 2008-09 season.

"Todd did a good job with our women's tennis team this year as interim coach," said Myers. "He proved that he is a good manager, and I am excited about the future of our program under Todd's direction. He will do a really good job for the Texas Tech women's tennis program."

As interim head coach, Tech finished the year with a 10-14 overall record and finished tied for seventh in the Big 12 with a 4-7 mark. The Lady Raiders also defeated two ranked teams including No. 21 TCU, which was the highest ranked team Tech had ever beaten in school history.

"I'm excited about the opportunity to continue to coach the Lady Raiders," Petty said. "It has always been a dream of mine to coach at this level. I believe Texas Tech is a special place, and has the resources to become on of the top programs in the country."

Prior to serving as interim head coach, Petty was the assistant coach for the Lady Raiders during the 2007-08 season.

Petty came to Lubbock after serving as head coach at Rider High School in Wichita Falls, Texas. While at Rider, he mentored several student-athletes to state qualifying berths, including three in 2003 who qualified for the 4-A state tournament, and one who won the 4-A state singles championship in 2006. In addition, his teams finished in the top five in the state of Texas from 2004-06, with the 2006 team placing third.

During his collegiate career, Petty played his first two years at Texas-San Antonio where he was named All-Southland Conference in both 1999 and 2000. He then transferred to Midwestern State University and was named to the 2002 Lone Star Conference All-Academic team and was selected an Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) All-American.

Petty graduated cum laude from Midwestern State with a degree in political science.

He and his wife, Angie, have a newborn son, Colt.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Centenary going from Div. 1 to Div. 3

Sign of The Economic Times: Centenary College Going From D-I to D-III

Posted Jul 22, 2009 6:10PM By Terrance Harris

If we are wondering just how much the downturn in the economy is affecting mid-majors and lower Division athletic programs all we have to do is look at Centenary College of Louisiana and the move it made this week.

The Board of Trustee for the Shreveport, La. school voted Tuesday to drop down from Division I to Division III as the school finds its way through some financial issues. So while schools like Texas, Ohio State and USC are having to maybe keep a closer count on the use of staples and how many copies are being made at the Xerox machine (USC also having to keep a closer watch on international calls from the team phone :lol:), the financial problems are real at schools like Centenary.

Centenary, with an enrollment of 839 students, currently supports 16 sports but does not play football.

Centenary's move was something the Board of Trustees struggling advised doing during their May 2008 meeting, telling the school it needed to pursue more geographically advantageous conferences. It was apparent then that it would only be a matter of time.

"This is one part of an overall wide-ranging plan which will be implemented by incoming President Dr. David Rowe," Ed Crawford, Board of Trustees Acting Chairman said in a released statemetn. "Centenary must and will restructure its overall strategy to achieve financial and academic stability. We on the Board look forward to working with President Rowe as he helps rebuild an even more firmly established Centenary College as a leading institution of higher education in the South and in the nation."

According to the Associated Press story, Centenary's endowment is down 20 percent and the United Methodist affliliated school is looking at ways to trim $1.5 million from its budget. That meant the athletic department had to take a hit.

And dropping down from Division I means so much more than just a reduction in status. It means fewerCentenary College basketball, if any scholarships, less travel and certainly less staff.

The board voted to leave the Summit League, but the school will remain in Division I and the league for two more years while it scouts out a suitable Division III conference.

But Centenary is far from alone is far from along is in struggling through these difficult economic times. Powerhouse schools like Stanford, Washington, Clemson and Wisconsin are having to make tough cuts in sports programs to make budgets.

It seems odd when you hear about athletic programs like Oklahoma being in financial position to give money to its struggling University or Florida, which last month saw its athletic budget increased to $89 despite 10 percent cuts in every sport except football and men's basketball.
 

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Princeton has hired their new coach.

Megan Bradley Named Princeton Women's Tennis Head Coach

PRINCETON – Megan Bradley, an outstanding talent as a collegiate player and most recently an assistant coach at the University of Miami, has been named head coach of the Princeton women’s tennis program, Director of Athletics Gary Walters announced Thurs., July 23.

“Princeton is very fortunate that it has the capacity to attract another coach and role model in the Louise Gengler-Kathy Sell tradition,” Walters commeted. “Megan was a great college player, an outstanding student, and has been a terrific ambassador for the game of tennis. We believe that Megan’s appointment will result in a seamless transition for our women’s tennis players.”

Just as Princeton made the NCAA tournament last season, playing on Miami’s home courts, the Hurricanes were an NCAA team all three years Bradley was a player as well as last season with her on the coaching staff.

“I’m just really excited that I get to be a coach at such a prestigious university with a great athletic tradition,” Bradley said. “I know the team is really good and Kathy Sell, the former coach, did a great job of establishing the program. I just hope that I can come in and really take the program to the next level.”

Bradley, a Miami alumna, returned to her alma mater for the 2008-09 season as a volunteer assistant coach following a career in sports media that led her to positions with the Tampa Bay Lightning, the USTA and two television stations in the Tampa Bay market.

As a collegian, Bradley was a two-time All-America with a 98-17 singles record, ranking fifth all-time in Miami program history, and a 34-4 career doubles record. Bradley played in both the NCAA singles and doubles tournaments during her career.

During her first year at Miami in 2002-03, Bradley attained a No. 2 ranking on the ITA singles list and was named MVP of the Big East tournament. The following season, Bradley reached the semifinals of the NCAA singles tournament while again rising as high as No. 2 on the ITA singles chart. As a senior, Bradley was an ESPN Academic All-America selection, the ITA National Player of the Year, the ACC Player of the Year, reached No. 1 on the ITA singles list and won ITA singles titles at the national indoor competition as well as at the South Regional event.

Before playing three years at Miami, Bradley began her collegiate career at UCLA in 2001-02, winning honors as a freshman All-America, as the ITA National Rookie of the Year, Pac-10 Freshman of the Year and a first-team All-Pac-10 selection. Bradley advanced to the final of the 2002 NCAA doubles tournament.

Following college, Bradley spent time playing tennis professionally, ranking in the world’s top 200.
Bradley earned her degree in sports administration with a minor in business administration at Miami in 2005. She also completed her masters degree in journalism and media studies at South Florida.

“I feel grateful to Gary Walters and his staff for believing in me and believing in my coaching philosophy,” Bradley said. “I’m just really excited to get started.”
Bradley’s father, Phil Bradley, played eight seasons of Major League Baseball for four clubs.
Coincidentally, though no relation, Phil Bradley was a teammate of Princeton head baseball coach Scott Bradley in Seattle for parts of two seasons in 1986 and 1987.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Indiana State cuts tennis

Indiana State Announces The Suspension Of Men’s And Women’s Tennis Programs

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — Due to budget reduction measures occurring throughout the university, Indiana State has announced the indefinite suspension of its men’s and women’s tennis programs, effective immediately.

“This was a very difficult and much discussed decision,” Ron Prettyman, Indiana State Director of Intercollegiate Athletics said. “I want to thank our tennis student-athletes, coach Malik Tabet, and coach Martha Montoya for their efforts and dedication to Sycamore Athletics and Indiana State University. We wish them well as they pursue other opportunities.”

“This decision was a budgetary decision that yielded the necessary budget cuts that are proportionate to reductions being incurred by other areas of the University,” Prettyman continued. “It allows for maintenance of operations budgets in other sponsored sports which is critical to our future success. We reviewed several options before reaching this conclusion.”

With the suspension of the men’s and women’s tennis programs, Indiana State now offers 14 intercollegiate varsity sport programs —six for men and eight for women.

All student athletes who have remaining eligibility will be granted immediate eligibility for competition if they choose to transfer to other schools.

ISU will honor all scholarships as agreed to for the 2009-10 academic year for tennis student-athletes wishing to continue their studies and complete their undergraduate education at Indiana State. The Athletics Department staff is committed to assisting student-athletes with decision-making and transitions to other universities.
 

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Next you are going to announce the Lindbergh baby has been kidnapped?

Indiana State made that announcement on May 15th. :wavey:


I see UCI just cut about $1.5 million (estimate) worth of sports YESTERDAY (M&W Swim & Dive, M&W Rowing and Sailing) and word is there is $3 million more to cut. Any thoughts on what's next at your place? It's pretty ugly everywhere in California.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Re: Indiana State cuts tennis

I posted the Indiana St. article partially to remind myself to check later if Indiana St.'s top of the line-up singles players have transferred anywhere.

I don't know what's next. :shrug:
Maybe getting assistance from the general fund, incurring lots of debt and pray funding comes back, or begging some deep pockets for a generous donation. I have no idea. Although I wouldn't mind if M&W track & field were cut. :devil:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Oklahoma St. hires new coach Chris Young

Aug. 5, 2009

STILLWATER, Okla. - Former Wichita State Director of Tennis Chris Young has been named the head women's tennis coach at Oklahoma State, pending approval by the OSU/A&M Board of Regents.

A native of Norman, Okla., Young returns to his home state where he competed as a collegian and began his coaching career.

"I am excited to return to my home state and being closer to so many friends and family that will support OSU," Young said. "I am also looking forward to building the Cowgirl program into a contender for Big 12 championships."

Young held his previous position for five years and led the WSU women's squad to a 94-38 mark and three Missouri Valley Conference titles. A three-time conference coach of the year selection, Young guided the Shockers to Missouri Valley Conference crowns in 2006, 2007 and 2009 to earn the only three NCAA Tournament appearances in school history.

His 2007 squad produced a school-record 27-3 mark and became the first-ever MVC squad to win an NCAA Tournament match after knocking off 25th-ranked South Carolina in the first round. That season, he was named the ITA Central Region Coach of the Year. The 2007 campaign also saw him earn the USTA/ITA National Award for Community Service.

Young produced 17 all-conference singles players, nine all-league doubles performers and 16 Missouri Valley Conference Scholar-Athletes during his tenure in Wichita.

Prior to taking over the Shocker program, Young worked as the assistant men's and women's coach at Oklahoma Christian University, including a stint as the interim head coach for both programs in 2002. He took charge of the women's program in 2003 before adding the OCU men's head coaching position to his list of duties the following year.

Under his direction, Oklahoma Christian had 20 players receive NAIA All-America honors. The 2004 season saw Young garner both the men's and women's conference coach of the year honors in addition to his recognition as the NAIA Region VI Women's Coach of the Year.

Young's coaching career got underway in 1999 in Ardmore, Okla., where he served as a teaching pro and assistant coach at Ardmore High School.

As a player, Young earned three letters from Oklahoma Christian and helped the Eagles to top-five national finishes in each of his three seasons.

A 2000 graduate of Oklahoma Christian, Young and his wife, Sarah, have two children, Braden and Kelsy.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Penn hires new coach Sanela Kunovac

PHILADELPHIA – The University of Pennsylvania’s director of athletics, Steve Bilsky, has announced the hiring of Sanela Kunovac C’04 as head coach of the Penn women’s tennis program.

“Sanela is an example of why Penn is such a great place,” said Bilsky. “Here is a young lady who overcame tremendous obstacles and took advantage of the opportunity Penn provided as a student. She will be a great coach and role model for the women she coaches.”

“It is great to be back at Penn!” said Kunovac. “Since my freshman year in 2000, I have felt a part of the Penn family. I am especially humbled to be returning in the capacity of women’s tennis head coach. I am extremely excited and grateful for the opportunity to lead the tennis team at such a prestigious University -- the same University for which I once competed with all my heart.

“I have set high goals for the upcoming years,” she continued. “I expect our team to compete at the highest levels and represent the University with pride and honor, both in the Ivy League and at the national level. I am aware that we have a long and challenging journey ahead of us, but I am confident in our players. I look forward to our journey and future successes.

“My return to Penn is a testament to strength and closeness of my family, and I am so grateful to my parents and my brother for their love, support and strong vote of confidence. I am thankful to Penn for this opportunity and extremely excited to build upon the foundation of success that the University and the tennis team have already put in place.”

Kunovac is a name familiar to people who follow Penn tennis -- she was the Ivy League Rookie of the Year and Player of the Year in 2001, the first Penn women’s tennis player to earn both honors in the same season. That freshman year, she played No. 1 singles and led the Quakers to their first Ivy League championship and an NCAA Championship first-round appearance. Penn also won the Ivy title in 2002, Kunovac’s sophomore season, and advanced to the second round of the NCAA Championship. Kunovac was the first three-year captain in program history and a two-time All-Ivy selection in both singles (2001, 2002) and doubles (2001, 2002).

Kunovac's path to Penn is an inspirational story. Born in Bosnia, she lived what she describes as an idyllic childhood until 1992, when Serbia and Croatia began battling over what was once Yugoslavia. With war in full gear, and roads blockaded, she was one of 70 children allowed to go to a tennis camp in Croatia through the Children's Embassy. Her mother and younger brother were able to join her on the trip, which was supposed to last two weeks. Instead, they stayed there for more than two years (much of it spent without her father, who was trapped in Bosnia).

Eventually, a peace treaty was signed. However, rather than return to Sarajevo, the now-reunited family moved to the United States and Kunovac earned a full scholarship to the Bollettieri Tennis Academy in Bradenton, Fla.

As a coach, Kunovac has worked at several different levels over the past few years. She was a volunteer assistant with the Penn women this past year, and in 2007-08 she was a volunteer assistant at the University of Arizona while working on her master’s degree. In 2006-07, Kunovac was head coach of the girls’ tennis team at Bradenton (Fla.) Prep, leading them to a share of the Class 1A state championship. Her top player, Carling Seguso, won the individual title that year, and the duo of Seguso and Alexandra Rasch the state doubles title. Seguso is currently playing college tennis at UCLA. Kunovac has also trained and mentored individual players in Florida.

"Sanela will do a great job in this new role,” said Arizona women’s tennis coach Vicky Maes, with whom Kunovac worked in 2007-08. “She has a lot of experience in the game and knows how to develop players. Her enthusiasm for college tennis is her biggest asset, and I wish her all the best as Penn’s new head coach."

While a student at Penn, Kunovac also was a Student Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) member all four years, serving on the executive committee for three of them, and was a Friars Senior Honors Society inductee. She graduated in 2004 with degrees in economics and in Penn’s PPE (Philosophy, Politics and Economics) program. In January 2009, Kunovac earned her master’s in International Relations and Comparative Politics from the University of Arizona.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Re: Maryland hires new coach Howard Joffe

July 10, 2009

COLLEGE PARK, Md. - Howard Joffe, the reigning Mid-American Conference Coach of the Year, has been hired as head coach of the University of Maryland women's tennis program.

Joffe, who spent the last two seasons as Miami University head coach, was hired by the Terps on Friday.

He has experienced tremendous success as both an assistant and head coach.

This past season he led the RedHawks to the MAC Tournament title and their first NCAA Tournament appearance in school history.

Prior to his successful stint at Miami (Ohio), Joffe spent five seasons (2002-07) as the assistant women's tennis coach at the University of Southern California.

"(Assistant director of athletics) Keli Cunningham and her search committee made a terrific hire for us," Maryland director of athletics Deborah A. Yow said. "Howard is a proven recruiter and fierce competitor, who also shares our values for academic achievement."

Joffe has earned a number of accolades for his coaching prowess.

In addition to being named the 2009 league coach of the year, Joffe was a two-time recipient of the Intercollegiate Tennis Association's West Region Assistant Coach of the Year award with the Trojans, earning the honor in 2004 and 2006. He was also the runner-up for the 2006 ITA National Assistant Coach of the Year award.

USC was among the top teams in the country during his tenure as the Trojans finished in the ITA top 10 each season.

Joffe's RedHawks were ranked nationally for the first time in school history this season and ended the year 16-7, including an 8-0 mark in conference action. They also won the MAC regular-season title for the first time in 10 years.

The RedHawks were led by their underclassmen who were recruited by Joffe.

Monica Gorny was the 2009 MAC Freshman of the Year and earned first team all-league honors. Sophomore Anastasia Dracheva was also a first team All-MAC selection.

The RedHawks were also stellar in the classroom with the team earning a perfect score of 1000 on the most recent Academic Progress Rate (APR) report.

"I'm privileged and honored to be the new head women's tennis coach at Maryland," Joffe said. "I'd like to thank Debbie Yow, Keli Cunningham and the rest of the administration for affording me this fabulous opportunity."

Joffe is also looking forward to coaching in the Atlantic Coast Conference.

"Maryland has a wonderful reputation, top-notch facilities and plays in one of the best conferences in the country," Joffe said. "I'm confident that if the effort and work ethic of our group mimics that of the athletic administration, then the future of our team will be bright."

Joffe, 37, was also a skilled player, earning All-America honors at Pepperdine University in 1992 when he reached the semifinals of the NCAA Singles Championship.

After a three-year stint at Pepperdine (1990-92), Joffe spent three years in the professional ranks before embarking on a coaching career. He earned his psychology degree while coaching at USC.

A native of Johannesburg, South Africa, Joffe spent three years (1999-02) as a teaching professional and director of tennis at Kettering Tennis Center and Quail Run Racquet Clubs in Dayton, Ohio.

Prior to his return to the United States in 1999, Joffe spent four years teaching young tennis players in Johannesburg.

He established the Joffe-Wheeler Tennis Academy in Johannesburg, coached and managed the Gauteng Central Junior Tennis Team. He was also appointed the Gauteng Central tennis coach and served as head coach at Rand Afrikaanse University.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Miami (Ohio) hires new coach David Emery

David Emery Named Head Tennis Coach at Miami

Former Illinois assistant takes over RedHawks program

Aug. 17, 2009

OXFORD, Ohio - David Emery, an assistant coach at Illinois for the past three seasons, has been named Head Women's Tennis Coach at Miami University, Director of Athletics Brad Bates announced today. He replaces Howard Joffe, who resigned last month to become head coach at Maryland.

Emery joined the Fighting Illini in August of 2006 and helped turn around the program. After back-to-back 10th-place finishes in the Big Ten the first two seasons, Illinois returned to the NCAA Tournament in 2008, ending a three-year absence. This past season, the Illini posted a 19-8 record - the program's most wins since 1991 - finished fourth in the conference and advanced to the second round of the NCAA's.

"I want to thank Brad and the athletic administration for believing in me enough to give me this amazing opportunity," Emery said. "Miami University is one of the elite public universities in the country and has the framework in place to compete with the great teams in the nation. It will be my mission to win MAC Championships and propel Miami to an NCAA contender."

At Illinois, he was involved in all aspects of the program with a focus on recruiting. The most recent Illinois signing class was ranked fifth in the nation by tennisrecruiting.net. He served as an instructor and as director of the Illini Summer camp over the last three years and was named Midwest Regional Assistant Coach of the Year for 2009 by the Intercollegiate Tennis Association.

"David Emery is highly regarded as a rising star by leaders in the national tennis community and he was exceptionally impressive throughout our search process," Bates said. "He brings a wealth of experience as a student, teacher, player, scholar and coach to our program and we are very excited to have him join the Miami family."

A native of Fairfax, Va., Emery played at Virginia Tech from 2001-03 before transferring to James Madison, where he finished his final two years of eligibility. At James Madison, Emery played at the No. 1 singles position and received first team All-Colonial Athletic Association (CAA) in 2005, and second team All-CAA in 2004. Emery also served as team captain from 2003-05.

In 2005-06, Emery served as the assistant coach at JMU. With the Dukes, Emery helped the doubles tandem of Jesse Tarr and John Snead to an 8-2 record and third team All-CAA honors. Tarr also grabbed third team All-CAA in singles. In his first year on the staff, Emery helped the Dukes turn their record around, helping the team to a 13-13 season record, double the previous season's win total. As an assistant coach at James Madison, Emery's duties included assisting with team practice, team lifting and team travel. Most recently, Emery worked with Katie Ruckert, who is an established singles player on the pro tour, helping her reach a world ranking of 412.

Emery is a 2005 graduate of James Madison with a degree in sports management and a minor in business.

What Others are saying about Coach David Emery

Illinois Head Coach Michelle Dasso

"Dave had a tremendous impact on the Illini progam and there is no doubt in my mind he will do the same at Miami. The players he has worked with have a great deal of respect for the hard work and relationships he has fostered. He will be greatly missed by the whole Illini family, but will make an immediate positive impact on his new program."
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Wichita St. hires new coach Colin Foster

Foster Named Head Women's Tennis Coach

Release: 08/19/2009

WICHITA, Kan. – Colin Foster, former assistant women’s tennis coach at TCU, has been named the seventh head women's tennis coach at Wichita State, Director of Athletics Eric Sexton announced on Wednesday.

"Colin communicated a vision of excellence that builds upon the foundation and direction of our women's tennis program," Sexton said. "The future of the program is very bright. With Colin's strong recruiting presence and cutting edge player development skills, we have put together a winning combination that can take this program to new levels."

In his three seasons with the Horned Frogs, Foster helped create a Mountain West Conference power. He helped guide TCU to the NCAA Tournament in each of his three seasons in Fort Worth, sending players to the NCAA Individual Championships each year as well.

Foster has mentored three All-Americans as an assistant, and was twice voted the ITA Southwest Region Assistant Coach of the Year in 2008 and 2009. The Horned Frogs won a pair of regular season championships during his time there, including the 2009 Mountain West Conference Tournament title.

“I’m thrilled and so grateful for the opportunity to join the Wichita State staff,” Foster said. “I’m looking forward to meeting all the players and getting started.”

Before launching his coaching career, Foster enjoyed a highly successful playing career at Purdue. He spent the majority of his senior year competing in the No. 1 position and finished his career as the team’s Most Valuable Player. The Western Springs, Ill., native was also successful in the classroom, being named to the Academic All-Big Ten Team every year.

Foster takes over a Shocker program that was ranked as high as 33rd nationally last season, and begins the 2009-10 season as the defending Missouri Valley Conference regular season and tournament champions along with NCAA Tournament appearances in three of the last four seasons.

“Chris Young did an incredible job during his time at WSU," Foster said. “I’m excited about our program's recent success on both the conference and national levels. I’m excited to continue that direction and the opportunity to make an even bigger splash on the national scene.”

The announcement also brings changes to the men's side of the Shocker tennis program. Head men's tennis coach Brad Louderback will also take on the additional role of Director of Operations for the Sheldon Coleman Complex, taking over the management of the day-to-day operations of the tennis complex in addition to his coaching responsibilities.

What others are saying about Coach Foster:

Jeff Hammond, Head Coach, TCU
“I’m really happy for Colin. A great program has found a great coach. It’s a great match for both sides, and he’ll do very well there. I’m extremely proud of him.”

“[At TCU] Colin has taken the team and individual players to an extremely high level during his time here. There’s no doubt he’ll continue to do that in the future. He has a great tennis mind.”

Jay Louderback, Head Coach, Notre Dame
“I’ve had the chance to coach against him at the NCAA tournament quite a few times. I was very impressed with how he handled his kids. He was terrific with on-court adjustments during matches to put his kids in a good position to win. I think he’ll be a great fit at WSU.”

“It seems like his kids always really like playing for him. It always helps you when your kids respect you and enjoy playing for you. He’ll work them hard, but they’ll enjoy him, too.”

Mat Iandolo, Head Coach, Utah
“I’ve known Colin since he was a freshman at Purdue [while coaching women’s tennis at Purdue]. I’ve really enjoyed watching him develop from a very good college player to a great college coach. Now he’s been given the shot at coaching at a nationally ranked collegiate level, and I look forward to watching him excel there, too.”

“I’ve known him for quite a while. He’s a great guy with a great personality. He will be well-liked at WSU.”
 

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Discussion Starter #20
New Mexico associate coach Roy Canada takes over

New Mexico coach Kathy Kolankiewicz is retiring. Associate head coach, Roy Cañada will take over the program for the 2009-2010 season.

June 30, 2009

Kathy Kolankiewicz ended her final season as the head coach of the University of New Mexico women's tennis team after 24 years. The team finished 10-14 overall and 4-4 in the Mountain West Conference. Kolankiewicz posted double digit wins each year she coached at New Mexico and ended her tenure with an all-time record of 356-236.

Kolankiewicz earned her 350th win with a 4-3 victory on March 19 against UT-Arlington. She retired as the winningest coach in program history and guided the Lobos to seven NCAA Championship appearances her last 13 seasons. From 1986-2009 Kolankiewicz took the women's tennis team to either the finals or semifinals of the conference championships.
 
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