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[email protected] the Jordan and Durr examples

I do think a one handed is a better option for slice though. I'm an aggressive two-handed myself-but use a one-handed slice very effectively when I have too. Taking a hand off that wing also allows me to hit a wicked drop shot. I have no forehand dropshot to speak of-but my backhand dropper is a killer!

When we think of the Queen of dropshots I think most of us agree it's Evert by a mile. Think about this though-it was her forehand drop shot. She very rarely hit a backhand drop shot.
 

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Internet persona aside, in my real tennis playing life I play with a two-hander but have become very reliant on the one-handed slice. I picked it up as a kid in about 1988 when Wilander made it trendy. I recall reading years later that his using of the one-handed slice contributed to his freefall in the rankings as he wound up relying too heavily on it and it made his game more 'complacent'. It's an interesting theory, though I suspect burnout and 'recreational activities' played a more significant role. I say that as a huge Mats fan, but I suspect he enjoyed the trappings of being number 1 more than being number !.
 

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Pammy!? A TWO HANDER!? SAY IT ISNT SO!

I started playing in 1975 and got my first lessons the next summer. The instructor taught all the kids (10 and under) to hit with two hands. I finally switched to a single hand in 1980 after watching Hana beat Martina in the 4th round of the US Open. Then I was on the high school tennis team for one semester at age 16 and switched back to two hands. I don’t recall why, but I immediately switched back to the single hand after that and never looked back. By 1987 I was actually able to hit fairly decent top spin and even flirted with Sabatini spins/grips for a while, with some fleeting success. Now I vary slice and top spin (non-Sabatini garden varieties). I can knife a pretty good slice that skids when the ball is at the right height, but as with all my shots, it might go ten feet out or it might be a fun winner. Ya never know.
 

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Chris Evert with the 1974 Wimbledon trophy. It was a shock win, as nobody expected Chris to win a major on grass, a surface where she had never beaten Evonne Goolagong or Billie Jean King. But both favorites were upset in the quartrerfinals, clearing the path for Chrissie.

182071
 

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Chris Evert with the 1974 Wimbledon trophy. It was a shock win, as nobody expected Chris to win a major on grass, a surface where she had never beaten Evonne Goolagong or Billie Jean King. But both favorites were upset in the quartrerfinals, clearing the path for Chrissie.

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Every all time great player, has at least one very lucky major win on their resume, and this was probably Evert's luckiest beating #6, and # 9 seeds. Court's changing diapers, and King and Goolagong losing early and Wade on the other side of the draw. On the other hand, as we look back now, Evert made sure she was in position to consistently take advantage of whatever breaks in the draw favored her. Evert did not just 'happen to be' in the right place, at the right time. She clawed and fought her way into the right place at the right time virtually every time. That's how you get into 54 QF, 52 SF, and 34 finals to win 18 out of 56 entries.
 

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Every all time great player, has at least one very lucky major win on their resume, and this was probably Evert's luckiest beating #6, and # 9 seeds. Court's changing diapers, and King and Goolagong losing early and Wade on the other side of the draw. On the other hand, as we look back now, Evert made sure she was in position to consistently take advantage of whatever breaks in the draw favored her. Evert did not just 'happen to be' in the right place, at the right time. She clawed and fought her way into the right place at the right time virtually every time. That's how you get into 54 QF, 52 SF, and 34 finals to win 18 out of 56 entries.
This is a great point! Chrissie was always right there ready for the opportunity because she just did not lose the matches she was supposed to win. I think she and others have said it before but her level just did not drop that significantly ever (though it also didn't rise as significantly either), as Julie Heldman said when commentating on the 1975 U.S. Open final, she always played within herself.
 

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This is a great point! Chrissie was always right there ready for the opportunity because she just did not lose the matches she was supposed to win. I think she and others have said it before but her level just did not drop that significantly ever (though it also didn't rise as significantly either), as Julie Heldman said when commentating on the 1975 U.S. Open final, she always played within herself.
Another way to put this, while several others reached ascended greater heights, out of the mortal stratosphere at times, ( God that was beautiful to watch with Serena, or Graf, or Martina, when they were everywhere, there was a magnet from the ball to their rackets and gold just flew off!) the disparity between her best tennis, and her worst tennis was smaller than any other champions. When Graf simply could not find her forehand, or Martina her serve, and their games went flat, there could be a real upset. Because Evert's ground game was so technically sound and her footwork so instinctively secure, nothing went far wrong When Evert was 'flat' she just needed to make a few corrections and hit through it to get solid again - unless one expected for Chris to just go to mental pieces in frustration or plain give up instead.

Yeah, go ahead...wait for her 'melt down'. There's a plan.
 

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Great posts about Chris. It’s so true that the disparity between her best and her worst was so much smaller than that of Serena, Martina and Steffi (in that order) that she would pull out matches on her worst day that they could only do during their respective peaks. Chris seemed to peak from 1970 to 1989, given her consistency and lack of bad losses, year after year after year. It was wonderful to witness (even if I did root against most of the time, pre-1986).
 

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Having given these other greats their proper due for soaring over the peons beneath them, when Evert was playing ,at the very top of her game, when she simply could not miss a return, and an almost nothing strayed out, when she seemingly knew exactly what was coming before it was hit, sending passes just inches out of reach over and over and over and over, and then watching players scramble backwards for lobs hit from literally any part of the court almost at her whim. That too was a remarkable sight to watch

Baseliners found themselves trapped with no option at all, running, running, and running. They would hit harder and harder, deeper and deeper, or hit wider and wider, and getting absolutely nowhere. Everything they tried, came back with just a little interest.

She could treat her s/v opponents like insects.... pick a left forewing off here, break a back leg off there, tear off the left antenna next and then grab that right forewing. When she was 'in the zone', she could be just as devastating as other greats, without blasting them off the court..
 
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