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Which way do they go ?

Zheng Jie

or

Jie Zheng

Na Li

or

Li Na

:confused:
 

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:lol::lol:


I have no idea but I think its Jie as a first name..
 

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Chinese people say their last names first, so in theory, it should be Zheng Jie and Li Na.

I am so westernized I say Jie Zheng and Na Li most of the time though :p
 

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Chinese people say their last names first, so in theory, it should be Zheng Jie and Li Na.

I am so westernized I say Jie Zheng and Na Li most of the time though :p
And I am so "chinisified" (can I say that?) that I always say Zheng Jie and Li Na! :p
 
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To the player herself, or media, or other Chinese people, if you are writing/speaking about them, use the last name first: Zheng Jie, Peng Shuai, Li Na.


Here on this forum, because we feel we know the players so well, :p , when we talk about them we use first name, Jie, Shuai, and Na.



And don't forget Tiantian and Zi. :wavey:
 

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lol so confusing...

and cause - well i am anyways - so used to western names, i never know which is the first name and which is the last name anyways:lol:
 

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I always thought about making a thread about this subject, because is so confuse!
In Olympics, it was Serena WILLIAMS, Venus WILLIAMS, Elena DEMENTIEVA and the chinese, LI Na and ZHENG Jie!
Yeah, I think you should call them by the last name first, I think it´s that!
 

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Which way do they go ?

Zheng Jie

or

Jie Zheng

Na Li

or

Li Na

:confused:
Zhèng Jié, Lǐ Nà. In Chinese the family name goes first. Both Zhèng and Lǐ are among the commonest Chinese family names. There must be hundreds of thousands if not millions of people with those two names.

What looks like accent marks indicates the tone of the syllable (there are 4 tones and a 'neutral' fifth in Mandarin). The transcription scheme is the one one officially employed in Communist China. Taiwan uses a different transcription.
 

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My family name is also Li:D,it is said people whose family name is Li is the largest group in China,probably more than 100 million?:unsure:
 

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Zhèng Jié, Lǐ Nà. In Chinese the family name goes first. Both Zhèng and Lǐ are among the commonest Chinese family names. There must be hundreds of thousands if not millions of people with those two names.

What looks like accent marks indicates the tone of the syllable (there are 4 tones and a 'neutral' fifth in Mandarin). The transcription scheme is the one one officially employed in Communist China. Taiwan uses a different transcription.
Is there unicode or something for the tones? I always wondered about that and usually write like Zheng(4) Jie(2) etc...
 

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Is there unicode or something for the tones? I always wondered about that and usually write like Zheng(4) Jie(2) etc...

The tone part is the most difficult part of Chinese pronunciation,even for native chinese people,there is no unicode, you just need to remember,if you speak them frequently,then you can naturally master I think.But some characters have 2 or 3 tones,it's scary:scared:
 

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I've never found it confusing because it's just a switcharoo between given name and surname. :confused:

I remember during Hopman Cup this year, Hsieh Su-Wei's name would come up as 'Su-Wei' when they were showing her statistics. So it would have 'Cornet - service percentage 54%' and 'Su-Wei - service percentage 34%' or something like that. :mad: It drove me insane.
 

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Is there unicode or something for the tones? I always wondered about that and usually write like Zheng(4) Jie(2) etc...
Unicode is for encoding glyphs not for pronunciation. But if you are asking whether the letters with tone markings which are used in pinyin transcription are part of Unicode, then the answer is 'yes'.

Similarly, all more or less commonly used phonetic symbols are part of Unicode.

You may find the following page particularly useful:

http://www.pinyin.info/unicode/unicode_test.html

Your practice of writing "Zheng(4) Jie(2) etc..." is perfectly reasonable when you can use only so called ASCII characters i.e. unaccented Latin alphabet.

You can always use so called international US English keymap to insert accents but if you write pinyin often enough I would consider making your own keymap module. It is not hard, and then in Windows XP and Vista you can very easily and convenioently switch between keymaps (you do this differently under Linux, and differently in an excellent text editor like vim).

For Windows I prepared a number of my own keymaps, for example one that allows me easily input any accented letter or ligature of any Central European Language (all Slavic which use Latin script, Hungarian, and Romanian), I enhanced a standard yawerty Cyrillic keymap to be able to input any Russian text even in pre-revolutionary orthography that used a number of additional letters, some freqently, some in just a few words, ѣ і ї ѵ.
 

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what is your family name?Ben:unsure:
Wxxx.:p

The tone part is the most difficult part of Chinese pronunciation,even for native chinese people,there is no unicode, you just need to remember,if you speak them frequently,then you can naturally master I think.But some characters have 2 or 3 tones,it's scary:scared:
轻声 is the worst。:eek: and the second and third tone is the most confusing for me.:eek:

so
Zheng J.
Peng S.

instead of S. Peng and J.Zheng?

I had always troubles with that :eek:
I prefer S. Peng/J. Zheng.:p
 

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so
Zheng J.
Peng S.

instead of S. Peng and J.Zheng?

I had always troubles with that :eek:
Chinese names (family name combined with a given name) are in nearly all cases three or two syllables long. No need to use initials because there is no need for abbreviation in the first place.
 
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