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USTA Names U.S. Tennis Teams For 2003 Pan American Games

7/10/03 3:53 PM

Bogomolov, Kim and Morrison To Represent USA In Men’s Field
Cargill, Gullickson and Taylor Vie For Gold In Women’s Field

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., July 10, 2003 - The USTA named the U.S. teams that will represent the United States at the 2003 Pan American Games tennis competition August 4-10 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. U.S. Pan Am Men’s Coach Eliot Teltscher has selected Alex Bogomolov, Alex Kim, and Jeff Morrison; U.S. Pan Am Women’s Coach Debbie Graham has selected Ansley Cargill, Carly Gullickson, and Sarah Taylor.

The Pan American Games, the world’s second largest multi-sport event following the Olympic Games, will take place August 1-16 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. The tennis competition, that will feature men’s and women’s singles and doubles, will be held on hard courts at the Santo Domingo Tennis Center. The Pan American Games are held every four years in the year immediately prior to the Olympic Summer Games. Over 5,000 athletes from 42 Western Hemisphere nations will compete in 30 different events. Tennis players who have represented the United States in the past include Arthur Ashe, Pam Shriver, Chanda Rubin, Patrick McEnroe, Althea Gibson, Luke Jensen, Don Johnson, Darlene Hard and Alexandra Stevenson.

“These players have shown promise and potential of becoming part of the next wave of Americans to make a serious impact in the tennis world,” said Teltscher. “The Pan Am Games are a great proving ground for representing one’s country in a major international sporting event.”

“We are going to Santo Domingo to try and sweep gold medals in both singles and doubles,” said Graham. “We have a talented and enthusiastic team who can use playing in the Pan Am Games as a springboard to playing Fed Cup or the Olympic Games in the near future.”

Bogomolov, 20 and a resident of Miami, Fla., is one of the fastest-rising American men in professional tennis. In 2002, he defeated former world No. 2 Tommy Haas for his first ATP Tour level victory in Los Angeles. He won the 2002 USTA Boys’ 18 Championships and won the 1998 USTA Boy’s 16s Championships, defeating Andy Roddick in the final.

Kim, 24 and a resident of Potomac, Md., won the NCAA singles title as a junior at Stanford University in 2000. He reached the third round of the 2002 Australian Open, where he defeated reigning Olympic champion Yevgeny Kafelnikov in the second round. Last year in Washington, D.C., he defeated 2000 U.S. Olympic Team Member Todd Martin en route to the round of 16.

Morrison, 24 and a resident of Huntington, West Virginia, won the 1999 NCAA singles title as sophomore at the University of Florida, defeating Harvard’s James Blake in the final. He reached the third round of Wimbledon in 2002 - equaling the farthest advancement in the draw by an American that year at the All-England Club. He reached his first career ATP final earlier this year in doubles, pairing with reigning US Open champion Max Mirnyi in Adelaide, Australia.

Cargill, 21 of Atlanta, Ga., turned professional following her freshman year at Duke University in 2001, where she finished as the No. 2 player in the collegiate rankings. She reached the second round of the 2002 Australian Open, where she lost to Venus Williams.

Gullickson, 16 of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., is fresh off making her Grand Slam tournament debut at Wimbledon, where she lost in the first round to Iroda Tulyaganova 7-5 6-4 on Centre Court after advancing into the main draw through the qualifying rounds. Gullickson, the daughter of former major league baseball pitcher Bill Gullickson, won the USTA Girls 18 Super National Clay Court Championships in 2001 as a 14-year-old.

Taylor, 21, from Bradenton, Fla., registered her best result of her career in Miami this year, defeating top 20 players Anatassia Myskina and Ai Sugiyama en route to the round of 16. In her Grand Slam debut at the 2001 US Open, she reached the second round, defeating Marlene Weingartner en route.

At the 1999 Pan American Games in Winnipeg, the United States claimed a record five Pan American medals led by Paul Goldstein, who won the lone gold medal for the United States, defeating teammate and silver medallist Cecil Mamiit in the men’s singles final. In women’s singles, Tara Snyder claimed a silver medal while Alexandra Stevenson won a bronze medal. In men’s doubles, Bob and Mike Bryan earned the bronze medal.

Team nominations are subject to approval by the International Games Committee of the U.S. Olympic Committee.

The USTA is the national governing body for the sport of tennis in the U.S. It owns and operates the US Open, the largest annually attended sporting event in the world. In addition, it owns the 96 Pro Circuit events throughout the U.S., and selects the teams for the Davis Cup, Fed Cup, Olympic and Paralympic Games. A not-for-profit organization with more than 670,000 members, it invests 100% of its proceeds to promote and develop the growth of tennis, from the grass roots to the professional levels. For more information on the USTA, log on to usta.com.
 

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Go Carly.
 

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Tennisace said:
I wonder what the other countries' teams are...frankly I don't think there is any player that will be able to stop this trio of Americans.
i only know for Trinidad/Tobago and Jamaica. T&T are going with the Stone brothers and with a player called Ivor Grazette. Jamaica will rely mainly on Ryan Russell and Darren Brown. can they beat the US team? i doubt it. but it would be fantastic for them psychologically to topple any of the Americans. unfortunately i won't be there to see any of the action altho' ironically my sweetie and i had planned a trip to Punta Cana around the same time, but then changed our plans. too bad --- if i knew there was gonna be tennis on the island i would have been there in a heartbeat. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Jakeev said:
Lol well would you like me to go down a list? lol
LOL, I mean at this tournament. The trio of Americans are not that good, just better than the field of the PanAm games. I mean if you look at the tour, its dominated by Europeans and the States. There are only a handful of top North American players that are not from the States.
 

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Tennisace said:
LOL, I mean at this tournament. The trio of Americans are not that good, just better than the field of the PanAm games. I mean if you look at the tour, its dominated by Europeans and the States. There are only a handful of top North American players that are not from the States.
I think it's just gonna depend on who else is competing at the PanAm Games. If the top players from say Argentina, Columbia and Brazil are all competing, I don't think it's necessarily a guarantee the American choices will even medal.
 

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Set for takeoff
Bradenton's Sarah Taylor puts wrist injury behind her as she gets ready for the Pan American Games
DOUGLAS A. KAID
Herald Staff Writer

BRADENTON - When Sarah Taylor takes the court representing the United States in the Pan American Games Aug. 4-10 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, she will be 100 percent healthy. That's something she hasn't been able to say much the last four months.

A torn ligament in her right wrist cost Taylor her first shot at Wimbledon, and it made her put the racket down for three full weeks in June. But she said that's behind her, and she's looking forward to playing with the U.S. team, which includes Ansley Cargill and Carly Gullickson.

"It's and honor," said the Bradenton resident and IMG product, who moved to Florida from North Carolina to train at IMG seven years ago. "If they offer it to you, you take it. I got an offer from (U.S women's team coach) Debbie Graham, and I really jumped at it. I think it will be an amazing experience. It's a mini-Olympics in a lot of ways."

Graham goes into the games with confidence in the team she assembled.

"We are going to Santo Domingo to try and sweep gold medals in both singles and doubles," she said. "We have a talented and enthusiastic team who can use playing in the Pan Am Games as a springboard to playing Fed Cup or the Olympic Games in the near future."

A few more weeks playing with that bad wrist and none of it would have been a possibility for Taylor.

Ranked No. 81 in the WTA, Taylor called it a rookie mistake. She knew she shouldn't have been out there, but she wasn't about to stop while her game was going so well.

"I didn't realize how badly I hurt it," said Taylor, whose mother, Sally, was a nationally-ranked junior tennis player, while her brothers, Jeff and Robert, played collegiate tennis. "I had the adrenaline pumping and just kept going. Playing for two months with the wrist was not good move on my part."

Taylor, a winner of five International Tennis Federation singles titles, made it to the fourth round of NASDAQ 100 in March, beating current No. 10 Anastasia Myskina - the reigning Sarasota Clay Court Classic champion. But it was in the first round of the tournament that she injured her wrist in a fall.

Sure she pulled out of the Sarasota tournament, but she didn't exactly stop playing. With her success at the NASDAQ Taylor's ranking rose to No. 68 in the world and she wanted to keep up the hot streak that vaulted her higher than she'd even been since joining the tour in March of 2001.

So despite being barely able to pick up her racket at times, Taylor played in two lower-level tournaments in April, losing in the first round of both.

Finally in May she defaulted out of a French Open warm-up in Madrid after playing less than two sets. After an MRI showed ligament damage, Taylor decided to play at Roland Garros anyway.

"The doctor said the longer I played the more damage I could do but I figured I could go one more week," Taylor said. "The injury had a whole impact on everything - on my happiness. I didn't really how it was affecting me until I could play again healthy."

She lost in the first round again, and it was time to shut it down.

"Missing Wimbledon was the hardest thing I've ever done," Taylor said, who said the injury wasn't bad enough to require surgery. "But it was probably the right move because cause I'm healthy now and I wouldn't be if I had played."

She thinks the time she missed will help her career.

"It was definitely a character-building experience," said Taylor, who admitted being rusty in the two tournaments she's played since returning from the wrist injury. "I was playing great and I had finally started to figure things when I got hurt. It was definitely frustrating. But I'm only 21 and I want to keep playing until I'm 28 or 29. I have a lot more years to play and as long as I'm healthy I can do that."
 
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