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I should have been more specific and said recent ancestors

Not all of us have neanderthal blood :wavey:
Most likely we all have blood from different groups of ancestors, most of them not discovered yet (or ever). Neanderthals are simply best known because geographically they populated Europe where earliest findings were conducted (due to good climate and the development of science).
 

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This is disputed.

https://www.genetics.org/content/202/1/261

However, we did not find a genetic connection between the Ainu and populations of the Tibetan plateau, rejecting their long-held hypothetical connection based on Y chromosome data. Unlike all other East Asian populations investigated, the Ainu have a closer genetic relationship with northeast Siberians than with central Siberians, suggesting ancient connections among populations around the Sea of Okhotsk.
The Ainu form an outgroup to all East Asian farmers including Tibetan populations
However, we did not find a genetic connection between the Ainu and populations of the Tibetan plateau,
They contradict that later saying:

Therefore, even if the presence of the D-M174 haplogroup in the Ainu and Tibetans is due to shared ancestry, the shared history of these populations was short and left only a weak genome-wide signature of shared variation in their gene pools.
So, instead of the Ainu ancestors coming from Tibet (as I had previously read,) both Tibet and Ainu ancestors came from more in the area of Thailand according to this study. And that weak connection would be due to it being a long time ago. Ainu ancestors have been in Japan since 20,000 years ago or so. The common ancestor with what would become Tibetans is maybe 30,000 years ago or more. And since Japanese ancestors didn't get to Japan until a few thousands years ago there is a long time for those "East Asian features" to have developed since the Ainu ancestors left south-east Asia (and connecting with northeast Siberians in the meantime).

Back to the Neanderthal thing, they couldn't have evolved separately, as you and me couldn't have Neanderthal DNA, as Homo sapiens and Neanderthals (and Densivons, too) wouldn't be able to procreate with each other.
 

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Most likely we all have blood from different groups of ancestors, most of them not discovered yet (or ever). Neanderthals are simply best known because geographically they populated Europe where earliest findings were conducted (due to good climate and the development of science).
This is based on?
 

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I don't know if this has made the news outside Germany had, it's brand new.

In Germany, they have discovered something which might considered a super early man, walking upright and so, which has lived 11,6 million years ago. Remember Lucy, who is up until now considered one of the first "humans" is 3,2 million years old.

If all that proves to be true, the "Out of Africa" theory might be just dust.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danuvius_guggenmosi
 

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A Google translate version (slightly tweaked by me to improve the translation).

Danuvius guggenmosi is an extinct species of ape which lived about twelve million years ago. It was first described in 2019 by Madelaine Böhme and her team.

Finds

The 11.62-million-year-old Danuvius was discovered in the Hammerschmiede clay pit in the municipality of Pforzen in the Swabian district of Ostallgäu. Between 2015 and 2018 the paleontologists unearthed a total of 37 individual finds, representing about 15% of the entire skeleton of the primate. Among them were fully preserved arm and leg bones, vertebrae, finger and toe bones. The good state of conservation of the fossil skeleton is astonishing for its age and allowed for the accurate analysis of functionally important joints and the similarity to today's modern humans was noticed.

Technically, the dentition of Danuvius resembles Dryopithecus and other European apes of the late Miocene. It had a broad chest and a spine, which like modern man's is S-shaped. The extended hips and knees indicate an upright biped, but its elongated front legs are more reminiscent of a climbing monkey. With these features, Danuvius marks an intermediate stage between tree and primary earth-dwelling apes.

Naming

The name of the genus is derived from the Celtic-Roman river god Danuvius and refers to the site in the catchment area of ​​the Danube. The epithet guggenmosi honours the discoverer of the Hammerschmiede site, the Allgäu amateur archaeologist Sigulf Guggenmos (1941-2018).
 

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I don't know if this has made the news outside Germany had, it's brand new.

In Germany, they have discovered something which might considered a super early man, walking upright and so, which has lived 11,6 million years ago. Remember Lucy, who is up until now considered one of the first "humans" is 3,2 million years old.

If all that proves to be true, the "Out of Africa" theory might be just dust.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danuvius_guggenmosi
This doesn't have anything to do with the "out of Africa" theory.

This is only about when bi-pedalism may have begun.
 

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This doesn't have anything to do with the "out of Africa" theory.

This is only about when bi-pedalism may have begun.
Of course it does. In Germany, remains of a creature have been found that went on two feet and which is 7 million years older than the oldest remains ever found in Africa.

So one might have to think about an "into Africa out of Africa theory". It's super new, so scientist really have to look into that. But those findings might turn the actual theories upside down.
 

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Of course it does. In Germany, remains of a creature have been found that went on two feet and which is 7 million years older than the oldest remains ever found in Africa.

So one might have to think about an "into Africa out of Africa theory". It's super new, so scientist really have to look into that. But those findings might turn the actual theories upside down.
Didn't the Nazis say something similar?

:shrug:
 

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Of course it does. In Germany, remains of a creature have been found that went on two feet and which is 7 million years older than the oldest remains ever found in Africa.

So one might have to think about an "into Africa out of Africa theory". It's super new, so scientist really have to look into that. But those findings might turn the actual theories upside down.
The out of Africa theory only has to do with homos, and more so homo sapiens.
 

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The out of Africa theory only has to do with homos, and more so homo sapiens.
Yes but even Homo sapiens might have some predecessor. Maybe even MUST have. And this discovery in Germany (and if you prefer it Europe) that shows some upright walking creature, which is like 3x older than the oldest remains found in Africa might be a game changer.

Science can only rely on what it knows. And until today, the oldest remains where always found in Africa. That is no longer the case. So I am curious on how that develops.
 

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All homos have the same ancestor. All Homos have existed in the last 2.5 million years.

Homos came from australopithecus, which is what Lucy belongs to.

Bipedalism before this discovery has been thought to be between 4-7 million years ago. This discovery would obviously push that back.

That's all it's about - bipedalism.

An ancestor being in Europe at this time, I don't think would be a surprise as the Earth was warmer at the time. Greenland didn't even have a glacier 11 million years ago.
 

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This doesn't have anything to do with the "out of Africa" theory.

This is only about when bi-pedalism may have begun.
But this is still actually shocking as a finding as it means that this is way before humans and chimps' common ancestor lived (6 millions ago). It does not obviously that this particular hominid is a common ancestor for chimpanzees and us.
 
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