Tennis Forum banner

5881 - 5884 of 5884 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,443 Posts
Update

Engrand, Marie Augustine Marcelle
France
Born 20 July 1877 in Maisons-Lafitte, Yvelines, Île-de-France
Died 15 February 1958 in Paris

Married Eugène Charles Henri Danet on 25 April 1898 in Paris

Active 1910-1934. In 1912, Jeanne Matthey won the women’s single title at the Closed French Championships for the fourth consecutive and last time. In the Challenge Round she defeated Marie Danet 6-2 7-5. This is the first time we encounter Mme Danet in a lawn tennis tournament. Marie’s husband, known as Henri, was a doctor of law, solicitor and President of the Chamber of Solicitors at the Court of First Instance in the Seine region. Marie Danet was a gifted landscape artist and, from 1899, exhibited her works at the Salon des artistes français (Salon of French Artists) in Paris.

Marie’s son, Roger Danet, born 22 February 1899, often played mixed doubles with Suzanne Lenglen. They were so close that at one point it was rumoured the pair were engaged to be married. Still active in the 1920s, Marie Danet was well past her prime in 1932, when she entered the International French Championships.

Link to the updated Wikipedia entry (in French) for Marie Danet:
https://fr.Wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Danet

Marie Danet in 1922

[Add photo]
-----
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,443 Posts
Update

Mény, Amélie Marie Marguerite
France
Born 3 December 1886 in Paris
Died 7 February 1941 in Fontenay-le-Comte, Vendée, Pays de la Loire

Married André Joseph Ernest Martin on 14 December 1916 in Paris

Active circa 1905-14. Marguerite Mény, as she was known, won the mixed doubles title at the French National Championships in 1910 with her brother Marc, whose full name was Édouard Marie Marc Mény de Marangue. As the holders, in 1911 they lost their mixed doubles title in the Challenge Round to André Gobert and Marguerite Broquedis by the score of 6-4, 6-3.

Marguerite (Mény) Martin’s husband, André, an artist, was killed in action during World War One while fighting with the French Army. He had reached the rank of lieutenant in the 47th Infantry Regiment. Marguerite and André had had one child together, a daughter called Hélène.

The following is a link to Marc Mény’s Wikipedia entry in French:
Édouard Mény de Marangue — Wikipédia
-----
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,443 Posts
Update

Prévost, Paule Marie Yvonne
France
Born 8 June 1878 in Saint-Énogat, Dinard
Died 3 March 1942 in Paris

Married Jules Auguste Boppe (1862-1921) on 11 May 1905 in Saint-François-de-Sales Church, Paris

Active circa 1900-1904. One of the best of the early French lawn tennis players, Yvonne Prévost, as she was known, was the daughter of Ernest Prévost, an attaché in the French senate and landowner, and Jeanne Prévost (née de Koenigswarter). Yvonne had three older brothers, including fellow lawn tennis player André Prévost (1875-1951).

Yvonne married Jules Auguste Boppe, a diplomat, on 11 May 1905. At the time, Auguste, as he was known, was a member of the French diplomatic corps and a First Secretary in Constantinople. His previous postings had included three years as Consul General in Jerusalem. After their wedding in 1905, Yvonne stopped taking part in lawn tennis tournaments. She and Auguste Boppe had three children together, a son called Roger (1907-89), and two daughters, Geneviève (1914-80) and Madeleine. Like his father before him, Roger Boppe would become a diplomat.

In 1917, Auguste Boppe was appointed as French Ambassador to Peking (modern-day Beijing). In the same year, he notably went to collect the effects of the Russian imperial family, to which he added the seals and visas. Auguste Boppe died of appendicitis in Peking on 17 May 1921. His funeral was celebrated a few days later in the cathedral in Peking, and his remains were subsequently returned to France.

The manifest of the ship Nanjing indicates that, soon after Auguste’s death, Yvonne Boppe sailed back to France, stopping first in San Francisco. The same source provides an approximate date and place of birth for her. It also indicates she spoke French, English, and German. Yvonne Boppe arrived back in France on board the ship Adriatic, which docked in the port of Cherbourg circa 13 August 1921. Her final destination was the city of Nancy, in north-east France, where she travelled to be with her in-laws. (Nancy was the birthplace of Auguste Boppe.)

1921 was a singularly awful year for the extended Boppe family. Auguste had died earlier in the year. In December of 1921, a relation of his, Paul Boppe, an inspector of water and forests, was charged with the attempted murder of his wife, Claire. (The papers refer to Auguste Boppe as “ex-minister to Peking”, apparently unaware he had died. He had had no siblings.) Paul Boppe was later sentenced to five years’ hard labour for his crime and died in July 1926, at the age of 44, while serving his sentence in a penal colony in French Guyana.
--

Some of Yvonne Prévost’s main successes include:

1900 Olympic silver medal in women’s singles event in Paris
1900 Olympic silver medal in mixed doubles event in Paris (w. Harold Mahony of Ireland!)
1900 Women’s singles titles at French National Championships
1902 and 1903 Mixed doubles title (w. Reginald Forbes) at French National championships
1903 Women’s singles title at International Swiss Championships in Saint Moritz
--

Link to the updated Wikipedia entry (in French) on Yvonne Prévost:
https://fr.Wikipedia.org/wiki/Yvonne_Pr%C3%A9vost
-----




 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,443 Posts
Update

Régnier, Anne Germaine
France
Born 6 June 1887 in Dijon
Died 14 August 1973 in Boulogne-Billancourt, Hauts-de-Seine

Married George Jackson Lewis Golding on 5 March 1912 in Paris

Active circa 1910-33. Anne Germaine Régnier, known as Germaine, was the daughter of Jean-Marie Georges Régnier, a wine merchant, and Camille Berthe Régnier (née Dietz). Jean-Marie Régnier was the son of the President of the Chamber of Commerce in Dijon, Germaine’s birthplace in north-east France. In March 1912, Germaine married the Englishman George Golding in a registry office in Paris. Their marriage certificate describes him as an officer in the British Colonial Army. He also took part in lawn tennis tournaments, but less frequently than Germaine. The Goldings probably had no children and it is difficult to trace their later life together.
--

Germaine Régnier first came to public attention in 1910, when she reached the Challenge Round of the women’s singles event at the French National Championships in Paris before losing a close match to Jeanne Matthey, 1-6 6-1 9-7.

In 1914, Germaine, now Mme Golding, reached the women’s singles final at the World Hard Court Championships in Paris, then the biggest clay court tournament in the world. She lost, 6-2 6-1, toher prodigiously talented 15-year-old compatriot Suzanne Lenglen, a player she was destined never to defeat. In the final Germaine tried to dictate play with her forehand, but usually made an error after three or four shots.

From 1914 to 1918, World War One interrupted Germaine Golding’s tennis career, though not completely, as she took part in a tournament at Gstaad in 1917 and was also runner-up in the women’s singles event at that year’s International Swiss Championships tournament, held in Lausanne. Later on, in 1921, Germaine partnered with Suzanne Lenglen to win the women’s doubles event at the World Hard Court Championships. This was her second title at the World Hard Court Championships – in 1920 she had won the mixed doubles title with her countryman William Laurentz.

Germaine Golding’s greatest success arguably came in 1922, at the World Covered Court Championships in Saint Moritz, Switzerland, where she won a rare “triple crown”. In the women’s singles final she defeated her compatriot Jeanne Vaussard, before taking the women’s doubles title with the same player and the mixed doubles title with her countryman Jean Borotra. At that time there were three official world championship tournaments in the sport of lawn tennis, those on covered courts (indoors), hard courts (clay) and grass courts (Wimbledon).

As indicated above, Germaine Golding had to settle for being second in France behind Suzanne Lenglen. In fact, Germaine lost three consecutive women’s singles finals at the French National Championships to Lenglen, from 1921 to 1923. The 1923 final was the most intriguing. Germaine actually led 4-0 in the second set when Lenglen righted herself and swept the next six games to win 6-1 6-4.

By 1924, Germaine was still good enough to win the bronze medal in the women’s singles event at the Paris Olympics, this at the age of 37. She won her last known title in Paris in 1931. Germaine would continue talking part in tournaments until 1933. For the most part she had limited her lawn tennis to continental Europe, entering Wimbledon only once, in 1923, although she defaulted without striking a ball.

Germaine Golding was a competent baseliner with a strong forehand. Her serve had a large “cut,” or slice, which made a strange bounce on impact and took some getting used to. By contrast her backhand was a weakness that better players were usually able to exploit.

Germaine Golding at the World Hard Court Championship in Paris circa 1914:

[Add photo]
--

Sources and links:

Germaine Golding’s updated Wikipedia entry in French:
Germaine Golding — Wikipédia

Germaine Golding’s Wikipedia entry in English (not updated):
Germaine Golding - Wikipedia

A short thread featuring some photos of Germaine Golding:
Germaine Golding Picture Thread
-----
 
5881 - 5884 of 5884 Posts
Top