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SPOWERS, “BERYL” (Leila Howard Beryl Spowers)
Australia (Queensland)
Born 27 July 1892 in Queensland
Died
Married Henry "Harry" Macauley Turner, 27 January 1915

Queensland Champion in 1913 and 1926
Australian QF (1926) and SF (1927)

[Thanks to Gee Tee for this information]
 

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SMITH, ANNE (Anne Elizabeth Smith)
United States
Born 01 July 1959 in Dallas, Texas.
Height 5 ft 5 in (1.65 m)
Career Span: 1978-1992.
Nickname: "Pepper"

A righthander known for her deadly serve and overhead.A doubles master, she was World No. 1 in 1980 and 1981, much of her success came with fellow American Kathy Jordan, with whom she had 4 slams and 4RU appearances in majors. Smith also won the 1982 French with Martina Navratilova.

Grand Slam Titles=10. (5 in Doubles and 5 in Mixed Doubles.)

(Doubles)
Australian Open W (1981)
French Open W (1980, 1982)
Wimbledon W (1980)
US Open W (1981)

(Mixed Doubles)
French Open W (1980, 1984)
Wimbledon W (1982)
US Open W (1981, 1982)

Her highest singles ranking was World No. 12 in 1982, the year she reached the final of Washington and made the QF at Wimbledon.

Noted for being very religious and introverted, Anne took at least of couple of extended breaks from competitive play in the 1980s.

Singles
Career record 203–175 (note some Futures results are missing from this total)
Career titles 0 WTA
Highest ranking No. 12 (May 1, 1982)

Doubles
Career record 416–168
Career titles 32 WTA
Highest ranking No. 1 (October 1, 1981)

Anne Smith is the author of Grand Slam: Coach Your Mind to Win in Sports, Business & Life,, and The MACH 4 Mental Training System: A Handbook for Athletes, Coaches and Parents. Smith is a licensed psychologist and a licensed specialist in school psychology. She received a doctor of philosophy degree in educational psychology at The University of Texas and a bachelor of arts in psychology at Trinity University. She was the coach of the WTT Boston Lobsters team in 2005, 2006, and 2007.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Smith



 

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SQUIRE, MABEL (Mabel Bramwell Squire)
United Kingdom
Born 22 July 1881
Died 12 August 1962
Married (1) Ernest George Parton, 15 May 1906
Married (2) Theodore Mavrogordato, 19 July 1924

Sonia Mavrogordato may well be her stepdaughter
 

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STAFFORD, MARGERY
United States

Married to Paul Fremont-Smith (1921-2000)(engaged on 21 November 1941)-later divorced
5 children included Christopher, a seconf son, born on 12 June 1945 in Boston.

Sons obit lists her as being from Bas Harbor. She was a ranked player in New England who competed as early as 1943 and as late as 1961.
 

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STALEY, “JENNY” (Jennifer Jane Staley)
Australia (Victoria)
Born 3 March 1934
Married Lewis Alan “Lew” Hoad, 18 June 1955
Active from the 1950s to early 1970s.

Titles
Australian HC Champ 1954
South Australian Champ 1954, 1955

Jenny Staley Hoad is an Australian former tennis player who was mainly active in the 1950s.In 1953 she won the junior singles title at the Australian Championships.

As Jenny Staley she reached the singles final of 1954 Australian Championships, played in Sydney, but lost in straight sets to Thelma Coyne Long. In November 1954 she reached the final of the New South Wales Championships which she lost in three sets to Beryl Penrose. In December 1954 she was runner-up to Coyne Long at the Victorian Championships played in Kooyong.Staley won the singles title at the South Australian Championships at Adelaide in January 1955 defeating Fay Muller in the final in straight sets, defending a title there from 1954. At the1955 Australian Championships she partnered her then boyfriend Lew Hoad in the mixed event and were runner-ups to Thelma Coyne Long and George Worthington. Her best singles performance at the Wimbledon Championships was reaching the fourth round in 1955, losing to eight-seeded Angela Buxton, and 1956 when she was defeated by fifth-seeded and eventual champion Shirley Fry.
Lew Hoad proposed to Staley, on her 21st birthday party in March 1955 and they planned to announce their engagement in June in London while both were on an overseas tour. After arrival in London Staley discovered that she was pregnant and the couple decided to get married straight away. The marriage took place the following day on 18 June 1955 at St Mary's Church, Wimbledon in London on the eve of Wimbledon. There was considerable scandal involved, but the support of Davis Cup coach Harry Hopman helped them navigate through.
From that point forward her life revolved around Lew and the children (2 daughters and a son).After Hoad's retirement they moved to Fuengirola, Spain, near Málaga, where they operated a tennis resort, Lew Hoad's Campo de Tenis, for more than thirty years entertaining personal friends such as actors Sean Connery, Kirk Douglas, and saxophonist Stan Getz.
Jenny played sporadic events right up through the early 1970s. One can find her in many Spanish events from this time period.
Lew Hoad was diagnosed with leukemia in early 1994 and died of a heart attack on 3 July 1994 at the age of 59.Jenny Hoad sold the club in April 1999.
In 2002 she published My Life With Lew with Jack Pollard.

Jenny in 1954-when she was a finalist at the Australian Nationals.


Sources:

Hoad, Jenny. My Life With Lew. 2002.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jenny_Staley_Hoad
 

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FENWICK, "MAY" (Julia Margaret Fenwick)
United Kingdom
Born in 1851 in Newcastle, Northumberland
Died 16 October 1925 in Bournemouth, Dorset
Did not marry.

In 1881, the nascent Darlington tournament had an interesting draw in that it featured three sisters from the Fenwick family of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in Northumberland: May (probably christened Julia Margaret; b. 1851), Winifred (b. 1856) and Alice (b. 1858).

The sisters were three of the dozen or so children (six boys and six girls) of Henry William Fenwick and Charlotte Fenwick. Mr Fenwick appears to have come from a long line of distinguished lawmen and was himself a solicitor. At least four of his sons also played tournament tennis: Percival (b. 1860), William (b. 1862), Minden (b. 1864) and Mark (born?).

In the 1880's, some of the Fenwicks emigrated to New Zealand, where they continued to take part in tennis tournaments. Percival Fenwick won the New Zealand Championships in 1886, 1887 and 1888; Minden won it in 1889. The brothers excelled more at lawn tennis than did the sisters.

[Thanks to Newmark for this biography]
 

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FENWICK, WINIFRED
United Kingdom
Born circa 15 October 1856 in Newcastle, Northumberland
Died 04 June 1932 in Newcastle, Northumberland
Did not marry.

In 1881, the nascent Darlington tournament had an interesting draw in that it featured three sisters from the Fenwick family of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in Northumberland: May (probably christened Julia Margaret; b. 1851), Winifred (b. 1856) and Alice (b. 1858).

The sisters were three of the dozen or so children (six boys and six girls) of Henry William Fenwick and Charlotte Fenwick. Mr Fenwick appears to have come from a long line of distinguished lawmen and was himself a solicitor. At least four of his sons also played tournament tennis: Percival (b. 1860), William (b. 1862), Minden (b. 1864) and Mark (born?).

In the 1880's, some of the Fenwicks emigrated to New Zealand, where they continued to take part in tennis tournaments. Percival Fenwick won the New Zealand Championships in 1886, 1887 and 1888; Minden won it in 1889. The brothers excelled more at lawn tennis than did the sisters.

[Thanks to Newmark for this biography]
 

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FENWICK, ALICE
United Kingdom
Born 31 July 1858 in Newcastle, Northumberland
Died 29 December 1911 in Newcastle, Northumberland
Did not marry

In 1881, the nascent Darlington tournament had an interesting draw in that it featured three sisters from the Fenwick family of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in Northumberland: May (probably christened Julia Margaret; b. 1851), Winifred (b. 1856) and Alice (b. 1858).

The sisters were three of the dozen or so children (six boys and six girls) of Henry William Fenwick and Charlotte Fenwick. Mr Fenwick appears to have come from a long line of distinguished lawmen and was himself a solicitor. At least four of his sons also played tournament tennis: Percival (b. 1860), William (b. 1862), Minden (b. 1864) and Mark (born?).

In the 1880's, some of the Fenwicks emigrated to New Zealand, where they continued to take part in tennis tournaments. Percival Fenwick won the New Zealand Championships in 1886, 1887 and 1888; Minden won it in 1889. The brothers excelled more at lawn tennis than did the sisters.

[thanks to Newmark for this biography]
 

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HAGUE, MINNIE (Minnie Hemans Hague)
Canada
Born October to December 1868 in Wolverhampton, England
Died 10 November 1938 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
[Active from at least 1899 to 1914]

Canadian singles champion in 1902, runner-up, 1907

Born in Wolverhampton, England, she immigrated to Canada as a child in 1870.

1889 and 1900 Miss Hague of Montreal was the winner of the Quebec Province Championships. She won 8 Quebec Championships in all between 1899 and 1914.

Winner of the Canadian Championships at Niagara-on-the-Lake in 1902, where she walloped Violet Summerhayes in a 6-0 6-1 final. Minnie was still active in 1907, reaching the Canadian final, where she fell to Lois Moyes in 3 sets.





Sources:

Wright & Ditson officially adopted lawn tennis Guide for 1901. [Pages 140 and photo on page 141]

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...3&ref=acom

https://news.google.com/newspapers?n...8,522816&hl=en

[Thanks to Rollo for this information]
 

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STAMMERS, “KAY” (Katherine Esther Stammers)
United Kingdom
Born 3 April 1914 in St Albans, England, UK
Died 23 December 2005 in Louisville, Kentucky, US
Married (1) Michael Menzies, 24 January 1940 in Westminster, London, divorced, 1974
Married (2) Thomas Walker Bullitt, on 27 Sept 1975 Philadelphia, PA, US He died in 1991
Daughter Virginia Menzies (born 2 October 1943) married in 1972 to German Claud Labes.
Played: Lefthanded
[Career span: 1931-1947]

A pinup girl of the 1930s for her beauty, she also had a world top ten game ,most notably being the 1939 Wimbledon finalist, losing to Alice Marble. Most ranked her #2 in the world that year. Stammers also achieved world top ten rankings in 1935, 36, 38, and 1946.

In 1935 Stammers beat Helen Wills-Moody at Beckenham. This was the first defeat for Mrs Moody in England since 1924!

Her lefty forehand complemented a solid attacking game. Kay returned to action briefly after World War Two, playing in 1946 and 1947.

Grand Slam Singles results

French Open QF (1934)
Wimbledon F (1939)
US Open SF (1935, 1936, 1939)

Grand Slam Doubles results

French Open W (1935)
Wimbledon W (1935, 1936)
US Open F (1939)

World Ranking

1932: #9
1935: #3
1936: #7
1938: #9
1939: #2
1946: #8




Kay on a cigarette card from the 1930s.


Sources:

Kay Stammers - Person - National Portrait Gallery

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kay_Stammers
 

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STANFIELD, “DOT” (Doris Stanfield)
Australia
Born 31 October 1890 in Launceston, Tasmania
Died 19 May 1963 in Caulfield, Victoria
Married John Hastings Lester in 1927
[Active circa 1910-20]

1917 Tasmanian Champion

[Thanks to Gee Tee and Newmark for this information]
 

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STANTON, JANE (Jane Elizabeth Stanton)
United States
Born 28 June 1918 in Los Angeles, California.
Died 02 June 2009 in Los Angeles, California.
Married (1) John Alouis Summer (died in 1943) on 11 December 1938. Divorced by January 1943
Married (2) Gallagher after Dec 1941 and before summer 1945.
Married (3) Sutherland
[Active 1936-1941 and 1945]
She was from Los Angeles. In 1936 she was a sophomore at USC. In the fall of 1940 she was Mrs Summer and in Brazil. Her photo shows her to be a strikingly attractive blonde.

Single in the summer of 1941, when she played the US Nationals. She did not come east from 1942 to 1944.

United States Ranking

1937: #15 (3rd round Forest Hills)
1938: #14 (2nd round at Forest Hills)
1941: in top 20
1945: #18

[Thanks to Austirunner, Jimbo, and Rollo for this information]
 

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STANUELL, FLORENCE (Florence Margaret Stanuell)
Ireland
Born 1861 in Dublin, Ireland
Died 08 December 1936 at The Rectory, Chillenden, Kent
Did not marry.
Active from 1884-1895

Florence Stanuell was one of the most successful of the early Irish lawn tennis players. She won the singles title at the Irish Championships in 1893, having won the same title at the Northern Championships in 1891.

[Below is a condensed version of Mark Ryan's (Newmark's) thread on Florence-mainly omitting geneology. For the full version click on the link below]

A Biographical Sketch of the Irish Sportswoman Florence Stanuell
By Mark Ryan

Florence Margaret Stanuell was born in Dublin in 1861, when the Stanuell family was probably living on Morehampton Road. Coming from a well-to-do middle-class family, Florence would not normally have been expected to receive much of an education or to subsequently follow a profession. In those days most girls from her background received a minimum of education, often provided at home by a governess. In this respect, the finer points of charity work, sewing and household management were considered very important. After all, most such girls were destined to marry, have children and run their own household with a retinue of servants.

It is clear, however, that Florence Stanuell had a different fate from most girls and women form her privileged background, and not just because she went on to enjoy a good deal of success at sport. It is quite probable that she attended a private girls’ school in her early years, where sport was an important part of the curriculum and her natural talents in this arena were nurtured from an early age. Although the first Wimbledon tournament was not held until 1877, when Florence Stanuell was sixteen years of age, lawn tennis, originally considered as merely a pastime or hobby, quickly grew in popularity, especially among the middle class, and was soon being thought of as a real sport.

Growing up as she did on Morehampton Road, and subsequently on Clyde Road in Dublin, Florence Stanuell would have had many opportunities to play lawn tennis because courts were continually being laid down and clubs being opened as the sport grew in popularity. This was true not only for Dublin and the rest of Ireland, but also for the British Isles as a whole. It is even possible that the Stanuells might have had a court in the large back garden of one of their houses. After all, lawn tennis owes some of its original popularity to the fact that it was played on lawns throughout the British Isles when a match was often the occasion for a social gathering.

By the mid-1880s, when Florence Stanuell started taking part in lawn tennis tournaments, the popularity of the sport had spread far beyond the British Isles and other English-speaking countries. In the British Isles it was already possible to speak of ‘the lawn tennis season,’ which, being largely weather-dependent (virtually all tournaments were then held outdoors, on grass), began around mid-May and ended around mid-September. In this and other respects, it was light years away from the sport as it played nowadays.

Florence Stanuell’s first real success at tournament lawn tennis occurred in 1884, in the singles event at the nascent Derbyshire Championships tournament, held in mid-August in Buxton in that particular English county. From what was then an unusually large draw of 32 players, Florence came through to reach the final, where she faced the Englishwoman Agnes Watts (née Noon), who was part of a renowned family of lawn tennis players from Leicestershire. In the final Agnes Watts beat Florence very easily, 6-1, 6-2. The winner was clearly the more experienced tournament player, although it is likely that Florence Stanuell had at least been taking part in handicap events for a certain amount of time before entering level events, where competitors played on equal terms.

Over the course of the next dozen years or so, up until 1895, Florence Stanuell would take part in a varying, usually small, number of lawn tennis tournaments in England and Ireland. She would always take part in grass court tournaments and would enjoy success not just in the singles event, but also at doubles and mixed doubles.

During the lawn tennis season in 1885, Florence Stanuell won the singles title at the Darlington tournament, held in early August in Durham in that north-eastern English county. In the final of the singles event Florence beat her countrywoman Constance Butler, popularly known as ‘Connie’, 6-0, 7-5. In the final of the mixed doubles event at the same tournament Connie Butler had her revenge when she and the Englishman Patrick Bowes-Lyon beat Florence and another Englishman, Howard Pease, 6-4, 6-1.

A few weeks later, towards the end of the 1885 lawn tennis season, Florence Stanuell took part in the Derbyshire Championships tournament in Buxton again. She had been runner-up in the singles event one year earlier, but this time lost at the quarter-final stage to the redoubtable Englishwoman Blanche Bingley, 6-4, 6-4. The latter player would later become Wimbledon singles champion no less than six times.

In 1886, Florence Stanuell again limited her participation to the month of August and to just two tournaments, these once again being the Darlington tournament in Durham and the Derbyshire Championships in Buxton. In Durham, Florence swept the board, taking the singles, doubles and mixed doubles title. In the singles event she easily retained her title, defeating the Yorkshire player Beatrice Wood in the final, 6-2, 6-2. In the doubles event Florence teamed up with Connie Butler; in the final of this event they beat a Miss Langley and a Miss Surtees, 6-4, 6-3. In the mixed doubles event, where Florence’s partner was Patrick Bowes-Lyon, they beat Connie Butler and the Scotsman John Galbraith-Horn, 6-1, 7-5.

At Buxton a few weeks later, Florence was less successful. She gave Blanche Bingley a ‘walkover’ at the quarter-final of the singles event, but managed to reach the final of the doubles event with her sister-in-law, Louisa Martin, reference to whom has already been made. In this last match they lost to Lottie Dod and May Langrishe, 6-2, 7-5.

At this point in time the English player Lottie Dod, the first real lawn tennis prodigy of either sex, was still a month short of her fifteenth birthday. May Langrishe, a native of County Kilkenny, had won the singles title at the inaugural Irish Lawn Tennis Championships in 1879 at the age of 14 (she won the same title in 1883 and 1886), but was not a prodigy in the Lottie Dod sense of the word. Louisa Martin, Florence Stanuell’s partner in the doubles event at Buxton in 1886, was already Ireland’s best player. She defeated Blanche Bingley and May Langrishe on her way to the singles title at Buxton in 1886.

In 1887, Florence Stanuell took part in the Irish Lawn Tennis Championships for the first time. It is not clear why she had not taken part in this tournament in previous years. At this point in time the Irish Championships was, after Wimbledon, the second most prestigious tournament in the lawn tennis calendar, attracting, as it did, almost all of the top players from England and Ireland. Held in Fitzwilliam Square, a Georgian a small Georgian square located close to the city centre, and usually beginning in late May, it was also for several decades the season-opener in the calendar.

In 1887, Florence Stanuell lost her first match in the singles event at the Irish Championships to the English player Lilian Watson, but won the doubles title in partnership with Louisa Martin by defeating Lilian Watson and her sister Maud, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4. This was an impressive feat, given that the Watson sisters were an excellent combination, while Maud had won the singles title at Wimbledon in both 1884 and 1885 (the former year had seen the introduction of a women’s singles event at Wimbledon, five years after such an event had first been held at the Irish Championships).

In the second week of June 1887, the Watson sisters had their revenge against Florence Stanuell and Louisa Martin when they beat them in the final of the doubles event at the Cheltenham tournament, held during the first half of June. In the doubles final the English sisters won easily 6-4, 6-1. Louisa Martin impressively won the singles title at this tournament for the second year running, beating the once invincible Maud Watson in the final. In the semi-finals, Louisa Martin had beaten Florence Stanuell, 6-4, 6-4.

The third and last tournament in which Florence Stanuell took part in in 1887 was the Northern Lawn Tennis Association Tournament, popularly known as the Northern Championships. This tournament was held in mid-June, alternating annually between a venue in Liverpool and one in Manchester. In 1887, the venue was the Old Trafford Ground in Manchester, where Florence Stanuell reached the semi-finals of the singles event before the Englishwoman Margaret Bracewell beat her, 6-1, 6-8, 6-3. In the doubles event Florence and Louisa Martin lost in the final to Lottie Dod and her older sister, Ann, 6-4, 2-6, 6-3.

In 1888, possibly due to professional commitments, Florence Stanuell restricted her participation solely to the Northern Championships, held that year on the grounds of the Liverpool Cricket Club in Aigburth. In the quarter-finals of the singles event in Liverpool Florence Stanuell lost easily to Blanche Hillyard, the former Miss Bingley, 6-1, 6-2. (It is worth noting that, in those days, the draws at many lawn tennis tournaments, including the most important ones, were very small. For example, the draw for the women’s singles event at the Northern Championships in 1888 was just nine, plus the holder, Lottie Dod who, as the defending champion, did not have to play through the event, but instead was able to ‘sit out’ and await the winner of what was then known as the All-Comers’ event.)

In 1889, as if to make up for her almost complete absence from the lawn tennis scene during the previous year, Florence Stanuell took part in four tournaments. Her first appearance came at the Irish Championships in Dublin, where she lost in the quarter-finals of the singles event to Louisa Martin, 6-2, 8-6. Together, both players won the doubles event for the second time by defeating Blanche Hillyard and Lena Rice in the final, 6-4, 6-2.

Helena ‘Lena’ Rice, from County Tipperary, would one year later create history by winning the singles title at Wimbledon. No other Irishwoman had done so before her and none has done so since, although it should be remembered that Lena needed to win only two matches to take the title. The draw of four players did not include the top players of the time, Blanche Hillyard, Lottie Dod and Lena’s countrywoman, Louisa Martin, who was a better player, but only played at Wimbledon four times. In 1889, at the Irish Championships Louisa Martin won the singles title at the Irish Championships for the first of a record nine times when she beat Blanche Hillyard in the final, 7-5, 6-0.

The second lawn tennis tournament in which Florence Stanuell took part in 1889 was the West of England Championships, which was held in the popular spa town of Bath during the final week of May. From a draw of eight players, Florence reached the singles final in Bath where she took the first set off Louisa Martin before losing, 4-6, 6-1, 6-2. Although Florence was capable of ‘pushing’ Louisa Martin in a singles match, she would never beat her in this event at any tournament. However, there was a consolation of sorts for Florence in Bath when she and Louisa Martin won the doubles event together, beating the rather obscure N. Everett and N. Pope, both of whom appear to have been English, in the final, 6-0, 6-3.

One week later, at the Cheltenham tournament, Florence Stanuell again reached the singles final before again falling to the all-conquering Louisa Martin. This time the score was 6-1, 4-6, 6-2. In the mixed doubles event in Cheltenham, Florence Stanuell teamed up with the Irishman Arthur Wilson (full name Arthur John de Courcy Wilson). They won the title together, defeating Louisa Martin and the Englishman Wilfred Milne in the final, 7-5, 5-7, 6-2.

After taking part in the Cheltenham tournament in early June of 1889, Florence Stanuell did not reappear in tournament play until mid-August, when she entered the Derbyshire Championships in Buxton. She had last entered this tournament in 1886. In 1889, Florence lost her first match in the singles event at Buxton to Connie Butler, 6-2, 4-6, 6-4. Florence was also runner-up in the doubles event with Louisa Martin. In the final they were beaten by the English sisters Bertha and Mary Steedman, 6-4, 6-1. However, as they had done in Cheltenham in June, Florence and Arthur Wilson again won the mixed doubles event, this time by defeating Louisa Martin and the English player Patrick Brown in the final, 8-10, 6-1, 6-3.

In 1890, Florence Stanuell again began the lawn tennis season by taking part in the Irish Championships in Dublin in late May. She lost her first match in the singles event to Louisa Martin, 6-0, 6-4, but with the same player won the doubles event for the third time by defeating Blanche Hillyard and D. Meldon, the latter a rather obscure Irish player, in the final, 6-4, 6-2.

After her success in Dublin, Florence travelled across the Irish Sea to Bath to take part in the West of England Championships, held during the first week in June. In the singles event Florence lost once again to Louisa Martin, 6-3, 8-6, and in the doubles event Florence and Louisa Martin once again won the title. In the final they beat the English player Constance Bryan and the elusive N. Pope, 6-3, 6-3.

Sticking to her routine of taking part in very few lawn tennis tournaments, Florence Stanuell did not appear again until mid-August 1890, when she participated in the Derbyshire Championships in Buxton. Florence appears to have had a special liking for this particular tournament, which she entered almost every year. The Stanuell family might well have had connections in the county of Derbyshire before 1890. This was certainlly the case from 1890 onwards, when Florence’s eldest brother, Charles, married Ida Turner, a native of Buxton, there in April 1890.

In the Derbyshire Championships tournament itself, Florence lost her first match in the singles event, to Mary Steedman, 6-0, 6-4. She had better success in both doubles events, although she was unable to win the title in the either event. In the doubles event Mary Steedman and her sister Bertha defeated Florence and Louisa Martin in a close three-set final, 8-6, 6-8, 6-3. In the final of the mixed doubles event Louisa Martin and her partner, the Englishman Henry Nadin, beat Florence and her partner and countryman Harold Mahony, 6-2, 8-10, 6-0.(1890 had been another triumphant year for Louisa Martin who, with the exception of the doubles title in Bath, had won the singles, doubles and mixed titles at the Irish Championships, the West of England Championships and the Derbyshire Championships.)

Although she only took part in two lawn tennis tournaments during the 1891 season, Florence Stanuell had arguably her most successful season to date in this particular year. In late May, at the Irish Lawn Tennis Championships in Dublin, Florence reached the singles final for the first time before losing to Louisa Martin 6-2, 5-7, 6-0. In the doubles event in Dublin Florence and Louisa Martin won the doubles title together for the third year in a row and the fourth time in all when they beat N. Pope and Helen Jackson, the latter a native of Hexham in the English county of Northumberland, in the final, 6-2, 3-6, 6-4. For good measure Louisa Martin won the ‘triple crown’ again, taking the mixed doubles title with the Dubliner (David) Grainger Chaytor.

In the middle of June in 1891, Florence Stanuell took part in the Northern Championships lawn tennis tournament, which that year was held in Manchester. The best players of the time, Louisa Martin, Lottie Dod and Blanche Hillyard, were absent that year and from a modest field of ten players Florence made her way to the All-Comers’ Final of the singles event. In this match, which was also the championship match (Mary Steedman, the holder, was not defending, so there was no Challenge Round), Florence met and defeated the Yorkshire-born player Beatrice Wood, 6-3, 2-6, 6-4.

Despite the modest make-up of the singles draw at the Northern Championships in 1891, Florence Stanuell’s victory was nevertheless an impressive one in what was another excellent year for Irish lawn tennis. Just one week after Florence’s victory in Manchester another Irishwoman, Mabel Cahill from County Kilkenny, won the singles title at the United States Championships at the Philadelphia Cricket Club in Pennsylvania. In the Challenge Round Mabel defeated the holder, the American Ellen Roosevelt, 6-4, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3. Mabel Cahill also won the doubles title at the United Championships in 1891. (One year later, she would win the ‘triple crown’ of singles, doubles and mixed doubles at the same tournament.)

In 1892, Florence Stanuell limited her participation to just one tournament, the Irish Championships in late May. Here, she lost in quarter-finals to another Irishwoman, a Miss G. Crofton, 6-3, 10-8. At the same tournament Louisa Martin won the singles title for the fourth year in a row by defeating Miss G. Crofton in the final. However, her most impressive victory had come in the quarter-finals when she beat the virtually invincible Lottie Dod, 6-2, 2-6, 7-5.

The lawn tennis season of 1893 marked one of the last occasions on which Florence Stanuell took part in tournament play. She restricted therself to taking part in only one tournament, the Irish Championships, where, rather fittingly, she enjoyed the biggest success of her career in singles. From a modest field of ten, which did not include the very best players in the British Isles, Florence came through to the final where she faced the elusive Miss N. Pope. After a one-sided contest Florence emerged victorious, 6-2, 6-3, thus becoming singles champion of Ireland, a noteworthy achievement despite the modest nature of the entry in this particular event.

In the doubles event, which Florence Stanuell had won on four previous occasions with Louisa Martin, Florence was not quite so successful in 1893 as she been in previous years. Together with Miss G. Crofton, she reached the final round, but they were unable to take to the court so gave the other finalists, Jane Corder and a Miss Shaw, two of the top Scottish players of the time, a walkover.

As already indicated, Florence Stanuell took part in virtually no more lawn tennis tournaments after 1893. One exception to this came in 1895, when she and Louisa Martin teamed up for the doubles event at the Irish Championships in late May. However, they were unable to add to their tally of four titles in this event, losing in the semi-finals. Louisa Martin would continue to take part in lawn tennis tournaments on into the early twentieth century, eventually winning a record nine singles titles at the Irish Championships.




Source:

A Biographical Sketch of the Irish Sportswoman Florence Stanuell by Mark Ryan.
A Biographical Sketch of the Irish Sportswoman Florence Stanuell - TennisForum.com

[Thanks to Newmark for this biography]
 
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