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ISAAC, FRANCINE (nee Francine Roels)
Belgium
Married a Maurice Isaac by 1923
Born 1902
Died ????
[Active 1923-1956]

Most prominent in doubles-she was 7 times a Belgian national champion in doubles.

In 1923 event at the Chatreau d’Ardennes.

Ranked #2 in Belgium in 1932-she also entered the French that year. Playing as late as 1954. The NYT lists her as “Marie” in 1936, but it is Francine that she is usually listed under. Marie may well have been a part of her name (for example: "Marie Francine" or "Francine Marie").

Mme Isaac entered the Wimbledon mixed doubles in 1949 and 1950.

Note that we need to fix any results from the 1930s to read "Francine" rather than "Marie".
 

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ISLANOVA, RAUSA (Rausa Muhamedzhanovna Islanova)
Russia
Born 2 February 1948
Married Mikhail “Misha” Alexeivich Safin-a fellow tennis player, circa 1978
Husband AKA Mubin Aliamtsevich Safin

Mother of Marat (born 27 January 1980) and Dinara Safina (27 April 1986)-both born in Moscow. Misha ran the famous Spratak Club in Moscow. Coach to various players,including her son Marat from 6 to 13, when the family sent him to Spain. She also guided Myskina.

“She knows exactly how to coach kids. It's so hard to tell kids they have to do certain things, but she's really good at it. She understands children and she's a great person.”

Sometimes goes by the name “Rose”.
 

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ISNARD, LUDMILLA (nee Ludmilla Nikolaevna Isnar.)
Russia/United States.
Born 14 November 1892
Died 7 October 1983 in La Jolla, California.
Career Span: circa 1912-1938.

Daughter of Nicolai Isnar, who lived 1851-1932. The California death index indicates her mother’s maiden name was Doubrovsky, yet another site lists it as Mench.

1913 Russian champion, she also played the Riviera in 1914, becoming the first Russian female to do so at Monte Carlo that year.

She lived in Paris and London as Russian émigré after the Revolution, leaving Russia in 1920. Her father died in Paris. In France and in later years her family name was listed as Isnard, perhaps in response to emigrating, but mainly due to her father's original French heritage.

Ludmilla had a brother named Vadim. He was among Russian top 6-8 players. He played against the British in the famous Russia - UK match in St. Petersburg (1913). He also immigrated to Paris but never followed his sister to the US.

In 1925 and 1926 she was described as visiting the US. The 1930 census has her in New York City. She appears in many NYT results from 1930-38. At some point she became a US citizen. She appears to have been unmarried, yet the NYT sometimes calls her “Mrs Isnard” and sometimes “Miss.”

Mentioned in the New Yorker Magazine 20 March 1937 edition



http://web.comhem.se/gryf/genesis/en-US/1554.html

Post from Newmark explaining her origins
http://www.tennisforum.com/showpost.php?p=38307049&postcount=1124

[Thanks to Jimbo, Lkk, and Mark for helping to shape this biography. ]
 

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JACKS, MAY
United Kingdom
[Active 1889-1891]

Miss Jacks entered Wimbledon 3 times. She came the closest in 1890, when in a draw of 4 she won her first match and lost the final to Lena Rice 6-4 6-1.

Titles

1889 London Championships
1890 British Covered Courts


Sources:

Lawn Tennis at Home and Abroad. By Arthur Wallis Myers


http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/scores/draws/archive/players/c0e7751f-1087-4474-94c3-6a66616f7e23/index.html

http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/scores/draws/archive/pdfs/players/c0e7751f-1087-4474-94c3-6a66616f7e23_LS.pdf

[Thanks to Rollo for this information]
 

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JACKSON, HELEN
United Kingdom
Born 19 December 1867 in Hexham, Northumberland, England
Died 28 May 1940
Married George James Murray Atkins, 10 April 1902

Best known as the 1895 Wimbledon finalist-losing to Charlotte Cooper 7-5 8-6.

Helen Jackson (1867-1940) – A Forgotten Early Lawn Tennis Player
By Mark Ryan

Helen Jackson was born on December 19, 1867, in Hexham, a market town in the north-eastern English county of Northumberland. She was the third child and second daughter of Daniel Jackson, a medical doctor (b. 1838 in Newton Cambuslang, Glasgow, Scotland) and Isabella Jackson (née Scott; b. 1842 in Hexham).

Daniel Jackson, a graduate of Glasgow University, and Isabella Scott had married each other on June 9, 1864, in Hexham. Their first child, a girl called Jane, was born a little over a year later. In addition to Jane and Helen, the Jacksons would have fourteen more children, all of them also born in Hexham: John Archibald (b. 1866); George Scott (b. 1868); Isabella (b. 1870); David [Daniel] Noel (b. 1871); Katherine (b. 1873); Donaldson Bell (b. 1874); Marion (b. 1877); Frances [Fannie] (b. 1879); the twins Letitia Mary (b. 1881) and Robert (b. 1881-d. 1888, aged 6); Gertrude Octavia (b. 1883); Charles Strathnairn (b. 1884); Agnes Nora (b. 1886); and Edith (b. 1888).

Although a girl from Helen Jackson’s background would not really in those days have been expected to acquire much formal education, in her youth she did attend Coxlodge Junior School, a boarding school located on the High Street in the city of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in Northumberland. When the Census of England and Wales was taken on April 3, 1881, the 13-year-old Helen was listed as a boarder at this school, where the Principal was one Rebecca Kinsop.

In addition to the curriculum of subjects taught within the classroom, Helen Jackson and her fellow pupils are likely to have taken part in a number of sporting activities, possibly including lawn tennis, as it was then called. At that time this sport was still very much in its infancy – the first Wimbledon tournament had only been held in July of 1877 when Helen was nine years of age.

Throughout the 1880s, as Helen Jackson approached adulthood, lawn tennis was growing rapidly in popularity, with tournaments regularly being established throughout the British Isles and abroad. One such tournament was the Northumberland Championships, which was first held in the early 1880s, in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, the permanent venue for the tournament throughout its long history.

It was at the Northumberland Championships, usually held around late July, that Helen Jackson enjoyed some of her earliest and most notable successes. In 1889, at the age of 21, she won the women’s singles title at this tournament for the first time by beating her countrywoman Alice Pickering (née Simpson) in the final, 6-2, 6-4. In 1890 and 1891, Helen retained this title.

One year later, in 1892, Helen Jackson lost in the final of the Northumberland Championships to Jane Corder, also a native of Northumberland, while in 1894 Helen won the women’s singles title at this tournament for the fourth and last time when she defeated another Englishwoman, Blanche Hillyard (née Bingley), in the final, 6-3, 9-7. This was a noteworthy victory because Blanche Hillyard was the top female player in the British Isles at the time and was also the reigning Wimbledon singles champion.

Another tournament at which Helen Jackson won the women’s singles title more than once was the Scottish Championships, which was usually held in early June in Edinburgh. Here, she took the singles title in three consecutive years, 1890-92, thus gaining possession of the Challenge Cup. In 1891 and 1892, as the holder, she would have had to play only one match in the singles event. In the early days of lawn tennis a Challenge Round was in force in several events at a number of tournaments. This meant that the holder did not have to play through, but could “sit out” and wait to play the winner of what was known as the All-Comers’ event. Given her Scottish origins – her father was a native of Glasgow – her successes at the Scottish Championships must have meant a lot to Helen Jackson.

In 1894, Helen also became Welsh champion when, in early July, she won the women’s singles title at the Welsh Championships in Newport. In the Challenge Round she beat the holder, her compatriot Ethel Cochrane, 8-6, 6-2. One year later, in 1895, Helen lost possession of the Welsh title when she was beaten in the Challenge Round by Jane Corder after a close match, 4-6, 7-5, 6-4.

At the end of the lawn tennis season in 1894, Helen Jackson won the women’s singles title at the prestigious South of England Championships tournament, held around mid-September at Devonshire Park, Eastbourne, on the south coast. In the final match at this tournament Helen beat another Englishwoman Charlotte Cooper, a future Wimbledon singles champion, 6-4, 6-2.

Indeed, the following year Helen Jackson and Charlotte Cooper would meet several times in the final match at tournaments, most notably at Wimbledon. Up until 1895, Helen had taken part in this tournament only twice, in 1891 and 1892, when she had lost in the quarter-finals and the first round respectively. As already indicated, in 1895, Helen went all the way to the final match at Wimbledon (in the absence of the holder, Blanche Hillyard, this was the All-Comers’ Final) where she met Charlotte Cooper. After a memorable match the latter player emerged the victor by the close score of 7-5, 8-6.

In 1895, Helen Jackson was also runner-up at the Northern Championships tournament, held that year in mid-June in Manchester. In the final match she lost to the Irish player Louisa Martin, 7-5, 6-3. Perhaps Helen’s most notable success in 1895 came at the Derbyshire Championships, usually in early August in Buxton in that county in the East Midlands of England. In the final of the women’s singles event in Buxton Helen beat Blanche Hillyard, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3. Helen had also won the women’s single title at the Derbyshire Championships three years earlier, in 1892.

Later on in August of 1895, Helen Jacskon also won the singles title at the Exmouth tournament in southern English county of Devon when she beat Jane Corder in the final, 6-0, 3-6, 6-3. In the early 1880s the Exmouth tournament had been one of the first tournaments in the world to a feature a women’s singles event.

At the end of the lawn tennis season in 1895, Helen Jackson took part in two of the biggest tournaments in the lawn tennis calendar – the Sussex Championships in Brighton and the South of England Championships in Eastbourne in the same county of Sussex. At the latter tournament Helen was the defending women’s singles champion, but lost in the Challenge Round to Blanche Hillyard, 6-4, 6-1. A week or so earlier, in the Challenge Round at the Sussex Championships, Helen had also lost to the same player, 6-2, 6-2.

Although most of her successes came in the singles event at tournaments, Helen Jackson did also win a number of women’s doubles and mixed doubles titles during the course of her lawn tennis career. These include the All-England Women’s Doubles Championship, which in those days was held during the Derbyshire Championships in Buxton (there was no women’s doubles or mixed doubles event at Wimbledon at this point in time). In 1892, Helen won this title with the rather obscure Irish player known only as G. Crofton. In the final they beat the Irishwoman Connie Butler and her English partner, L. Clark, 6-1, 6-2.

One year earlier, in early June of 1891, Helen Jackson had also won the All England Mixed Doubles Championships, which at that point in time was held during the Northern Championships Tournament whose venue alternated between Manchester and Liverpool (in 1891, the former city was the venue). In the final match in this event Helen and her compatriot John Charles Kay defeated another English pair, T.G. Hill and Jane Corder, 6-2, 6-2.

Although Helen Jackson was only 28 years of age at the end of 1895, she never again enjoyed as much success as she did in that particular year and did not win any more singles titles at tournaments of note. Indeed, after 1896, she did not take part in many more tournaments at all. However, there is evidence that she helped coach some other lawn tennis players around this time, including Agnes Morton, a future top English player.

At some point, probably in the late 1890s, Helen Jackson met George James Murray Atkins, a solicitor by profession. He had been born on July 26, 1874, in the Indian city of Gorakhpur in the eastern state of Uttar Pradesh. His father, also called George, was stationed there at the time as a soldier in the 1st Bengal Infantry and would eventually rise to the rank of colonel. It is possible that Helen Jackson met George Murray Atkins in sporting circles because he would for many years be the honorary secretary of the Lichfield Lawn Tennis Club, in the English county of Staffordshire in the West Midlands. As a young man he was also an excellent cricketer and a member of the prestigious Marylebone Cricket Club.

Helen Jackson married George Murray Atkins on April 10, 1902, at Hexham Abbey in her place of birth. According to a newspaper report, Dr Daniel Jackson gave his daughter away, while a Mr J.G. Kay, of the Gordon Highlanders, a cousin of the bridegroom, was the best man. Helen and George would have one child, a daughter also called Helen. She was born on January 30, 1903, in the village of Chorleywood in the eastern English county of Hertfordshire.

Although the Murray Atkins were living in Chorleywood, Hertfordshire, at the time of their daughter’s birth, in 1919 they moved to Lichfield in Staffordshire where, as indicated above, George Murray Atkins would become honorary secretary of the Lichfield Lawn Tennis Club. He would also be Cathedral Registrar and Chapter Clerk of Lichfield Cathedral as well as Diocesan Registrar and Legal Secretary to the Bishop of Staffordshire.

George Murray Atkins died on January 16, 1953, at his home, The Close, in Lichfield. He was 78. In his will, amongst other things, he left to the Bishop of Staffordshire, the Right Reverend Lemprière Durell Hammond, “my billiard table, upon which we have had many happy games, the cues and all other accessories, should he be able to house them, otherwise they shall form part of my residuary estate, in which event he is to have the framed Old Laws of Cricket with coloured illustration, which is hanging in my study.”

In later life Helen Murray Atkins was involved with the local Girl Guides’ Association, becoming District Commissioner for Lichfield. After helping to raise more than £200.00 for a local Head Headquarters Hut she received the “Thanks Badge” from the District Commissioner of the Girl Guides, a distinction she is said to have treasured.

Helen Murray Atkins predeceased her husband by thirteen years. She died on May 28, 1940, at the family home, The Close, Lichfield. She was 72 years of age and had been an invalid for some months and seriously ill during the last eight weeks of her life. She left effects to the value of £1,253 17s, 1d. Administration was granted to George Murray Atkins and Helen Marjorie Murray Binns, the married daughter of Helen and George.

-----

Tournaments Won (15 titles known)

Bristol 1895
Derbyshire Championships in 1895
Exmouth in 1895
Hexham 1894
Northumberland Championships (4) 1889-1891 and 1894

Northumberland District 1896
Scottish Championships (3) 1890-1892
South of England Championships in 1894
Welsh Championships in 1894
West of England 1895



Source:

Helen Jackson (1867-1940) – A Forgotten Early Lawn Tennis Player
By Mark Ryan at: Helen Jackson (1867-1940) – A Forgotten Early Lawn Tennis Player - TennisForum.com

[Thanks to Newmark for his biographical piece on this player and to Charles Friesen for finding 4 additional titles.]
 

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JACKSON, JANET
Ireland
Born 29 September 1891
Died 26 November 1960 in Sunninghill, Berkshire, England
Did not marry.
Active circa 1910-14 and 1919-25.

1919 Irish RU.

Janet Jackson was also a top-class golfer. She won the bronze medal in the British Golf Championships in 1913, 1920 and 1921. She also wrote on the sport of golf.


[Thanks to Newmark for this information]
 

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JACKSON, MAUDE (nee Maude Helen Cooper)
Ireland/United Kingdom
Born 12 September 1898 in County Cork, Ireland
Died 1978 in Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England
Married Raymond Roper Washington Jackson in 1918 in County Cork
Active in the 1920s

Wimbledon Record (entered 1921-1924 and 1925 to 1928)

Singles: 3-5
Doubles: 5-7
Mixed: 3-6

Most often listed in draws as Mrs RRW Jackson.
 

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JACOBS, HELEN (Helen Hull Jacobs)
United States
Born 06 August 1908 in Globe, Arizona
Died 02 June 2 1997) in East Hampton, New York
Nicknames: "Our Helen", "Helen the Second". "Little Helen", "Rattlesnake of the West"
Trademarks: wearing shorts.
[Active 1925-1941]

World No. 1 in 1936, the year she achieved her life goal of winning Wimbledon. She also won 4 consecutive US titles from 1932 through 1935. in 1933 she won over Helen Wills Moody, her only victory in a rivalry that many in the press described as a "feud", a description both women denied.

More often than not Jacobs wore the tag of popular runner-up-losing 4 Wimbledon finals out of 5.

Her Jewish identity went largely unnoticed by the general public but was celebrated in the Jewish press. In it's magazine cover story from of September 14, 1936 Time magazine stated, "Helen Jacobs is not a Jew". (Time, p 38). This was technically correct as it was her father Roland who was Jewish, her mother Eula Hall being gentile. Jacobs herself never appears to have downplayed or highlighted being half-Jewish.

World Top Ten Rankings

1928: #9
1929: #3
1930: #6
1931: #4
1932: #2
1933: #2
1934: #2
1935: #2
1936: #1
1937: #6
1938: #2
1939: #3


Helen with the Wightman Cup


Sources:

Borish, Linda. "American Jewish Women on the Court: Seeking an Identity in Tennis in the Early Decades of the Twentieth Century", in Beyond Stereotypes: American Jews and Sports. 2014. Pages 43-73.

"Sport", Time volume 28, number 11. 14 September 1936. pages 36-45. [Jacobs was also on the cover]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_Jacobs
https://www.tennisforum.com/59-blast-past/753105-helen-jacobs-picture-thread.html
 

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JAHN, LAURA LOU
United States
Born 17 May 1933
Died 24 May 2001 in St Petersburg, Florida.
Married (1) Frank Carl Kunnen 25 November 1951 in Pinellas County, Florida*
Married (2) Jack Bryan in April 1960 at Monte Carlo, Monaco
[Active 1946-1961]

“I started learning tennis from my dad, Leslie Jahn, when I was 11 years old. He was the tennis pro at the Orange Lawn Tennis Club in South Orange, N.J.” Laura parents were twice married and then twice divorced to each other.

Laura Lou won early fame as a child prodigy in the late 1940s and as a junior rival to Maureen Connolly. Her father sued the USTA to get permission for her to play senior events. Her career was radically altered in 1949 after she accused her father of incest in September, running away just as she was about to enter the Pacific Southwest event in September that year. According to Laura she had been intimate with him from the age of 10. In the wake of this notorious incident Jahn would never again be considered a major player. Instead it was Mo Connolly who went on to stardom.

Laura Lou Jahn's father, Leslie E. Jahn (1907-1986), was eventually convicted of three counts of incest by a Californian jury December of 1949. At the time of the trial she was quoted as saying he need mental help rather than jail.

His appeal was based entirely on striking his daughter's incriminating but uncorroborated testimony. He claimed that she consented to these crimes and was, therefore, an "accomplice." The testimony of an "accomplice" to a crime cannot be considered unless it is corroborated.

The appeals court said that, as a minor, she could not legally consent to the crimes. Therefore, she could not be an "accomplice " His convictions were upheld.

Leslie Jahn waived his right to a jury trial. The judge weighed all the evidence and concluded that he was guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

From late 1949, she basically dropped off the national tennis scene, competing mainly in Florida. In 1951 Laura Lou did enter the US Nationals, but met with little success. After her marriage she mainly played in Florida except for a brief period (and marriage) when she played in Europe during the 1960 season.

Laura Lou created headlines in 1959 by wearing panties with Confederate flags on her cheeks in the Dixie event in Florida.

Echoing her parents married-divorced-and remarried the same man. Records indicate she divorced Frank Kunnen in September of 1959 and remarried him in February 1961. The couple had 4 children by the time of their divorce.

Eventually she had 6 sons and 1 daughter. Sons Frank "Chip" III and John, both of Palm Harbor, and Dennis of Portland, Ore., Michael of Port Charlotte, Guy Patrick of Dunedin and Bill of Clearwater and daughter Laura Lyons of Dunedin. (born 5 April 1969)

Laura with her infamous Confederate panties



Sources:

"Laura Lou Kunnen"
Laura Lou Jahn (Kunnen) - TennisForum.com

https://law.justia.com/cases/california/court-of-appeal/2d/99/236.html

[Thanks to Austinrunner and Rollo for this information]
 

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JAMAIN, Mme GILBERTE (nee Gilberte ????)
France
Married Jacques Jamain (1916-008) by 1946
[Active 1946 to 1952]

French Championships record (entered in 1946, 1948-1950, and 1952)

Singles: 2-5

She entered Wimbledon only once-in 1950.

Wed to French player Jacques Jamain, also prominent in the 1930s and 1940s. She is listed as Mme J Jamain at Wimbledon.

Sources:

Archive - Draws Archive : Gilberte Jamain - 2015 Wimbledon Championships Website - Official Site by IBM

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Jamain

[Thanks to Rollo for this information]
 

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JAMES, ”FREDA” (Winifred Alice James)
United Kingdom
Born 13 January 1911
Died 27 December 1988
Married Stephen Hereward Hammersley, 28 July 1938
[Active 1929 to 1955]

3 time major doubles winner-the 1933 at the US Women's National Championship (with Betty Nuthall), and Wimbledon in 1935 and 1936 (with Kay Stammers).

From 1931 to 1939, she was part of the British team in the Wightman Cup. This allowed her to make trips to the United Stares, where she made the singles quarterfinals in 1933 and 1934.

Freda won at least 9 events in singles from Nottingham (1930) to Edgbaston (1939).


James was from Yorkshire.







Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freda_James

Archive - Draws Archive : Freda Hammersley (James) - 2015 Wimbledon Championships Website - Official Site by IBM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqEcdWDymiY [1936 Wightman Cup clip. Freda is in the visor on the top left at the end of the clip]
 

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JARVIS, RITA (Rita Anderson Jarvis)
United Kingdom
Born 19 March 1916
Died 1982
Married (1) Owen Anderson in 1940. Divorced 17 March 1953. No children
Married (2) Jaroslav Drobny, 19 May, 1953 at Eaaling Register Office, London
[Active 1930-1952]

Father was Stanley W Jarvis. Mother’s maiden name was Anderson. Visited Australia in 1935. Home club Chiswick Park. Coached by Joan Lycett. Wed to Owen Anderson in 1940-the couple lived in Hollywood. She sued Owen for divorce on grounds of desertion.

 

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JARVIS, THELMA (nee Thelma Renee Jarvis)
United Kingdom
Born 8 February 1914
Died in April 2003 in district of Sutton. Aged 89 at death
Married Claude FO Lister in December of 1946
Son Martin Claude Charles Lister born December 1949

Active as late as 1958. Claude was also a tennis player, husband and wife pairing at Wimbledon in the mixed in 1951. Claude, from Enfeld, later coached the South Africans in Davis Cup when they won it in 1974. Claude’s Company was dissolved in 1991 with Thelma present-perhaps indicated she was widowed at this time
 
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