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HILTON, "BETTY" (nee Elizabeth Evelyn Clements)
Great Britain
Born 12 February 1920
Died 03 July 2017 (Death registered in Oxford, England)
Married (1) Raymond Hilton, 2 September 1942. He died during World War II
Married (2) Andrew James Christopher Harrison, 19 June 1950
Married (3) Lesley Raymond Smart, 19 September 1973
[Active 1939-1950]

"Blue-eyed" Betty was a favorite of British spectators in the 1940s.

Hilton reached the 1946 French quarterfinals and the quarters at Wimbledon in 1949 and 1950. She was ranked #10 in the world in Ned Potter's 1950 tennis rankings.

Mrs Hilton was on the Wightman Cup team for Great Britain from 1947 to 1950. Betty was a favorite of dress designer Ted Tinling. He designed a dress with a blue colored hem for the 1948 Wightman Cup to match her eyes. Hilton lost 6-1 6-1 to Louise Brough as expected, but Hazel Wightman, the donor of the Cup and American team captain, took great exception to the dress, declaring, "Betty lost because she is self conscious of the color on her dress!" Hazel used this incident to push for the "all-white" rule at Wimbledon, a measure the All-England Club instituted in 1949 (Love and Faults, p 186).

Married to Birmingham businessman Charles Harrison. She announces her retirement after Wimbledon, saying "I have finished with big time tennis for good. I feel I have had my day and in any case I don't think that marriage and tennis mix. " Harrison said she might enter local events for fun.

Wimbledon record
(entered in 1939 and from 1946 to 1950]

Singles:--- 14-6 (QF in 1949 and 1950)
Doubles:-- 11-5 (SF in 1949)
Mixed:---- 11-6 (QF in 1946 and 1950)

Hilton on the left, with partner Joy Gannon is in the background.




1947 Wightman Cuo. Doris Hart hits a shot while Betty Hilton's face is framed in the racquet





Sources:

Love and Faults: Personalities Who Have Changed The History of Tennis in My Lifetime. by Ted Tinling 1979
[page 186. Also a nice photo between pages 218 and 219]

10 Jul 1950 - Tennis and Marriage MRS. HARRISON TO RETIRE

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betty_Hilton

Video from the 1948 Wightman Cup
U.S.A. Holds Wightman Cup - British Pathé


Video from the 1950 Wightman Cup


https://www.****************/detail/video/quick-shot-doubles-match-british-player-betty-hilton-in-news-footage/597291990



Her Wimbledon record
The Championships, Wimbledon 2018 - Official Site by IBM

2018 Wimbledon Compendium and probate records provide her date of death.

[Thanks to Rollo for this information]
 

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HILLYARD, AGNES (nee Agnes Florence Richards)
Great Britain
Born in 1874
Died 5 May 1968 in Tunbridge Wells
Married Brame Hillyard (1876-1959) 7 Feb 1922 - Harrogate, Christchurch, West Yorkshire.
[Active 1922-1923]

Her father’s name was Charles Edward Richards
Active on the Riviera in 1922 with her husband. Her husband Brame was the first man to wear shorts at Wimbledon in 1930. Was Brame related to George? I have found no evidence for it so far. It was his second marriage-while Agnes is described as a spinster.

[Thanks to Newmark for this information]
 

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HILLYARD, BLANCHE (nee Blanche Bingley)
United Kingdom
Born 3 November 1863 in Gustaw Woods, Middlesex, England
Died 6 August 1946 in Chanctonbury, Sussex, England
Married George Whiteside Hillyard (1864-1943), 13 July 1887 in Greenford parish, Ealing, England
Trademark: always wore gloves.

6 times Wimbledon champion, a record until Mrs Dorothea Chambers broke her record in 1914.

Hillyard won The Championships in 1886,1889,1887,1899, and lastly in 1900 at the age of 36. Incredibly she made the semifinals in 1912 at age 48!

Won the mixed at Chiswick with George just a week after they were married.

Second rate in many tennis attributes, someone wrote "Mrs Hillyard has been known to volley; but only when the ball is on her racquet and no other course is open to her." The backhand was pure defense. She served overhand, but not with severity like Louisa Martin.

Only the forehand stood out among her strokes. Taken at the height of the bounce, she imparted a slight "overcut" (topspin) to her signature shot. Mrs Hillyard ran around her backhand to clout a forehand with regularity. It was this and in her resolution and will to win that Blanche excelled. Her keenness for the fight often swept aside opposition considered superior.

Blanche always wore gloves, perhaps to protect her hands from callouses.

Her backhand tended to float high, presenting opportunity for those who could volley.

Son Jack Montague Hillyard (born 31 January 1891 and died 16 February 1983) was later a player of note.

Herbert Chip estimates she had won 56 open singles events-this in 1898, the year his book was published. Her career continued on for several years. As she aged and slowed down a step Mrs Hillyard resorted more to the lob.

One example of her success wed to longevity was her record 12 titles at Eastbourne in the South of England Championships. She first won it in 1885-the 12th and last came in 1905. In between she became the mother of 3 children.

Mrs Hillyard




Sources:

Lawn Tennis Recollections, by Herbert Chipp, 1898. [pages 118-123]

https://www.tennisfame.com/hall-of-famers/inductees/blanche-bingley-hillyard/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blanche_Bingley

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=154557080&ref=acom
 

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HINGIS, MARTINA
Switzerland
Born 30 September 1980 in Kosice, Czechoslovakia
Married (1) Thibault Hutin, 10 December 2010 in Paris, France. Later divorced
Married (2) Harald Leemann, 20 July 2018 in Switzerland


Despite a smallish frame she hit her groundstrokes with some power and amazing accuracy. Her tennis brain was often on full display as the Swiss Miss varied tactics, angles, and pace to outwit more powerful foes.

Her first husband was a French show-jumper.
 

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HIRSCH, MILLICENT
United States
Born 1917
Died 10 February 1995 at Boca Raton, Florida
Married Nathaniel Lang on 05 April 1941
[Active in the 1930s and 1940s]

[Obituary from the New York Times]
Millicent Lang, Top Tennis Player, 78

Published: February 13, 1995

Millicent Hirsh Lang, a Bronx native who became a top-ranked women's tennis player in the 1930's and 1940's, died at a hospice in Boca Raton, Fla., on Friday. She was 78 and lived most of her life in Great Neck, L.I.

She died of a stroke, said her husband, Nathaniel Lang.

Mrs. Lang began playing tennis when she was 8 years old on public courts in the Bronx. She won her first public tournament at age 11. As a junior player, she captured three titles in the 1930's and at age 16 won the singles and doubles trophies at the United States Ladies Tennis Association National Indoors Tournament in 1933.

By the time she was 19, Mrs. Lang was a veteran on the women's tennis circuit. In the early 1940's, she was ranked 14th in United States women's singles and No. 1 in the Eastern states. In her later years, she played a prominent role in the Eastern Tennis Association.

She is survived by her husband; her daughters, Geraldine Jacobs of Woodstock, N.Y., Sarah Cleary of Warwick, N.Y., and Elizabeth Marino of Great Neck, and seven grandchildren.

[From the USTA Easten Hall of Fame, where Lang was inducted in 1994]

Millicent Hirsh Lang’s tennis memories are preserved in a scrapbook whose pages overflow with newspaper stories written by her friends, Allison Danzig of the New York Times and Fred Hawthorne of the old New York Herald Tribune.

Millicent’s joyous tennis career began in 1928 when, at age 11, she won her first women’s tournament at St. James Park in the Bronx.
“When I won that tournament, there was no trophy,” recalled Millicent, who that same year gave up a promising future as a concert pianist to pursue tennis. “But someone got to N.Y. Mayor Jimmy Walker, who quickly corrected the oversight, and my victory was noted on the front page of the Times.”
In the 66-year interim leading to her Hall of Fame induction, Millicent’s life intertwined with many tennis greats-including ETA Hall of Farmers Barbara Williams, Alastair Martin, Gene Scott and the late Frank Shields and John ‘Pat’ Rooney – as she first gained stature in the 1930s as national and Eastern champion, and later as a dedicated volunteer tournament director and senior player.

It all started with Millicent’s dad, Morris Hirsh, became interested in tennis. “Being the eldest of three daughters, if dad said, ‘Let’s go,’ I did. I was eight years old. We lived on the Grand Concourse in the Bronx across from the Kelton Tennis Courts and there we started,” she said. “On weekends we traipsed to St. James Park and many kindly gentlemen would hit with me.”

Millicent quickly distinguished herself as a junior player, capturing three titles in the early 1930s at the Anne Cumming Memorial tournament (a Jersey State girls’ event). She also won both the singles and doubles trophies at the 1933 USLTA National Indoors and ranked first in the Eastern section for several years.

By 1936 when she was 19, Millicent who had been attending New York University, was already a veteran on the women’s circuit. In November of that year, when the USLTA National Indoors debuted at the 7th Regiment Armory in New York, she was a singles runner-up to Sylvia Hemrotin of France, and advanced to the mixed doubles semifinals with Shields, who had been one of her more famous hitting partners during her youth.
“Frank and I were very good friends, we grew up together since we lived only one block apart," Millicent said. “I copied his big forehand and Helen Jacobs’ slice."

“That particular indoors was quite a gala. Ted Heusing narrated my final match with Sylvia over the radio. My father was there and he always made me nervous. I was leading 5-3 in the first set and lost it 7-5. After I won the second set I went up to the gallery (during my 10-minute rest period) to sit with my father, and then promptly lost the match.”

After the Indoors, Millicent, Frank Froehling, Sr. and Helen Pedersen (a Wimbledon semifinalist who ranked among the U.S. top 10 for nine years) toured the winter circuit together from February to June. They started in Bermuda, trekked to Chicago (where Millicent won the Western Indoors singles, doubles and mixed titles), then on to Houston, the Carolinas, Atlanta and Chattanooga, finally finishing in New Haven and Hartford.

“It was a wonderful experience, we all got on well,” she said. “The three of us toured in Frank’s (Froehling) 1928 Model A Ford. He was known as the ‘blond bomber,’ so naturally he received a lot of attention and fan mail.”

In the early 1940s, Millicent ranked 14th in the U.S. women’s singles, and lost to Louise Brough in the quarters of the U.S. National Championship at Forest Hill. She also married Nathaniel (Nat) Lang, and after the war, she and Nat stayed close to home in Great Neck, N.Y., raising three daughters. Later, Edith Martin asked her to run Eastern’s women circuit. Millicent enlisted Barbara Williams to help her organize the New Jersey/New York State and the Eastern Clay Courts, and Alastair Martin secured the Piping Rock Club on Long Island for her invitational grass court tournament, which often attracted future Grand Slam champions such as Billie Jean King and Virginia Wade. Millicent also captained and played on the Eastern’s Sears Cup teams for several years; and in the late 1960s and early ‘70s , she started the senior circuit, ranking first in that division with four different partners.

“When I was running Eastern women’s tournaments, I would call Gene Scott and request that he get some of my players into the U.S. Open draw at Forest Hills and he did,” she said. “Gene was counsel to the U.S Open in the early ‘70s and accepted entries for the tournament. I didn’t’ know him at all, yet he was most considerate.”

Millicent has enjoyed the whole adventure, especially such larks as playing exhibitions with the great Vinnie Richards at various clubs in the East, and reigning for several years with Lady Woodall as Bermuda’s doubles champs. Each spring, Pops Merrihew invited Millicent to participate in two Bermuda invitationals. On one occasion in the mid-‘50s, Sir John Woodall, the Governor General of the Bermuda, actually held up the departure of a commercial Pan-Am flight so that she and Lady Woodall could finish a final match. Millicent boarded the plane soaking wet but was happy to make the flight back to New York with Nat and the children.

“This Hall of Fame honor is an acclamation of my small accomplishments, but the real issue is how many friends did I make? Quite frankly, the old tennis friends are still my friends,” Millicent said.

About four weeks ago, the Langs’ Long Island home was burglarized and every bit of silver was taken, including all of Millicent’s tennis trophies. Soon afterward, she had lunch with her longtime Eastern tennis rivals and friends, Helen Pedersen (McLoughlin) and Norma Taubele. “Norma had retired the New Jersey State trophy, having won it three times,” Millicent said. “In a gesture of friendship, she asked me if I would like to have it since I had won it twice. So I took it and now I have a trophy again.”

Titles:

Philadelphia in 1937, Jackson Heights in 1939 and New York in 1940.



Sources:

http://ustaeasternhalloffame.com/1994.htm
 

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HIRSCHFELD, EKATERINA (Ekaterina Germanova Hirschfeld)
Russia
Born circa 1890
Died
Married Polonsky

Photos and Russian text here: http://www.smsport.ru/expo/katalog/tennis/polonskaya/

Google translate says: "One of the strongest tennis players of Russia at the beginning of XX century. Member of the Petrograd circle of athletes; established the Cup (1910) for male players in class 2. The winner of the 1st Russian championship in singles (1909), the championships of Russia (1912) in the mixed doubles and St. Petersburg (1909, 1911) in singles. Participant 1 match Moscow - Petrograd (1920). The team traveled to the Soviet tennis players in 1924 in Reval (Tallinn) and Riga to participate in international competitions and finalist of the tournament in singles and winner of the pair (Revel). In the mid-1920s, emigrated to France. Member of the Russian lawn tennis club in Paris. Semifinalist in singles and mixed doubles finalist in the tennis championship of Russia among emigrants (1931)."

 

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HITCHINGS, HILDA (Hilda Maude Hitchings)
Great Britain/New Zealand
Born in 1866
Died in 1968 in Wales
[Active 1897-1904]

1895 New Zealand Champion. She was originally the town of Napier.

Born with just one arm (the left) she "serves in a wonderfully clever manner by holding her racket with three fingers of her only hand, and a slight toss of the ball which is held by the remaining finger and thumb, followed by a quick twisty tap with the racket, results in a fast low service which is anything but easy to take."

She was unusually tall (5' 11) and had a sister Una who also played in NZ.

Hilda was runner up to Sarah Lance at the first New Zealand Championships in 1887. Finalist again in 1889, she finally broke through in 1895 to deafeat E Meese 6-3 6-4. Shortly afterwards she emigrated to Great Britain.

Hilda lived in London from the 1897 to 1906 and had some tournament play. Apparently around August 1904 she won the Ladies' Silver Challenge Cup of the St Quintin Lawn Tennis Club, decisively beating Miss Pocock. Her first tournament in England was the Chichester tournament in 1897 where she was defeated in the handicap singles.

She was also a fine singer, pianist and painter as well as being talented at needlework, making all her own dresses.

Her sister Una also played in NZ tournaments. Never married, at some point she returned to Great Britain, dying in Wales.

Sources:

"One Armed Tennis Expert", The Daily Argus, 2 February 1896, page 7.
https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2309&dat=18960212&id=NZUnAAAAIBAJ&sjid=gQQGAAAAIBAJ&pg=3657,2984667&hl=en

http://www.amazon.com/Hitchings-Tennis-Player-Champion-996J460/dp/B00X7RM9GG (includes photo)

[Thanks to Newmark and Rollo for this information]
 

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HITCHINS, PATRICIA (nee Patricia Marsh Butlin)
Mexico/United States
Born circa 1881
Died 27 September 1936 in Mexico City, Mexico
Married Charles Vernon Hitchins by 1913 (18 December 1864-24 December 1933)
Son Charles V Hitchins born circa 1913

Sister of tennis player Claude Marsh Butlin (17 April 1877-5 June 1940) Grew up playing at the Reforma Athletic Club in Mexico City.

Married by 20 March 1914, when she arrives from New York via a ship that sailed from Veracruz. She is also recorded making the same trip in 1932. Her husband Charles, originally from the UK, was a US citizen from 1915. She won the Middle States Championships in 1917. The couple resided in New York in 1918. By 1920 they were back in Mexico.

Death data found via Deaths of Americans Abroad (Ancestry.com). Cause of death chronic cirrosis of the liver. Buried in Panteon Moderno, grave 584. She was living with son Charles at time of death.

A photo may be found on page 102 of the May 15 1920 issue of American Lawn Tennis at: https://books.google.com/books?id=9B08AQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=editions:yyfLEBJp0FYC&hl=en&sa=X&ei=V6Y9VcTdCsahNuShgNAP&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

It declares her strengths to be "placing and headwork.".

[Thanks to Rollo for this biography]
 

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HITCHINGS, UNA (Una Mildred Hitchings)
New Zealand
Born in 1869
Died 19 May 1927 in Napier, Hawke's Bay
Married Dr John James Edgar in 1902
[Active circa 1885-90]

Sister of fellow lawn tennis player Hilda Hitchings.

[Thanks to Newmark for this information]
 

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HOAHING, "GEM" (Cynthia Gem Hoahing)
Great Britain
Born 20 October 1920 in Hong Kong
Died 15 October 2015 in London, England
Height: 4 feet 9 1/2 inches (1.46 metres)
Nicknames: “Little Gem”, “Little Poker Face” and “The Mighty Atom”
[Active 1933-1961]

The smallest world class tennis players ever, she was under 5 feet tall. She was at her best on clay, where her defensive skills could blunt the power of taller and stronger foes.

Cynthia Gem Hoahing was notable for for few reasons. First of all she was of Chinese heritage, her father being a successful businessman from Hong Kong. That alone made her unusual, but Gem had another claim to fame; she was by far the shortest world class tennis player of her generation, and perhaps of all time, standing well under five feet. Her height was 4 feet 9 1/2 inches (1.46 metres). Crowds inevitably cheered for the tiny Chinese girl with British citizenship. Gem never won a major or reached the world's top ten. What she did capture was many hearts.

Gem was born in 1921 in Hong Kong to parents of Chinese heritage. Earlier her family had emigrated to British Guyana. Her father was a Guyanese businessman who eventually settled in New York, while Gem's mother was educated in Edinburgh and Dublin, becoming one of the first doctors in British Guyana. Some sources report her name should have been translated as "Ho a hing".

At a mere 13 Gem was on the Riviera in 1934, where her ability to move and cover court astounded many, including her partner King Gustav of Sweden.

Cecil Vivian Richard Wong's memories regarding Gem, his first cousin

.............in 1947 my father sent me up to Cambridge & London to further my studies ....follow in his footsteps & obtain my membership to the ICAEW in 1954.On my return to London in 1947 I was welcomed by my cousin Gem Hoahing & her mother who was a qualified medical practitioner at King's Cross Station & taken to their lovely home called Neville House in Twickenham.....an extensive property with fruit orchard & a lawn tennis court...Gem..in her time was a tennis prodigy & I was in one of the front seats when she beat glamorous Gussy Moran in the third round at Wimbledon. The headline the next day was that little G beat big G.....for Gem was a little under 5 foot & Gussy Moran was a tall elegant fashion model as well as number 3 ranked US tennis behind Louise Brough & Margaret....Gem had powerful ground strokes & was fleet of foot to make up for her lack of inches...For her achievements she was invited to be member of the All England Club at Wimbledon as well as Queens & Hurlingham..Being a cousin of Gem enabled me to attend the All England Tennis Championships regularly & frequently between 1948 & 1952
At 4 foot 9.5 inches, she is by far the shortest world class female player of her generation. Hoahing competed at Wimbledon from 1937 to 1961 – reaching as far as the quarter-finals in the Ladies’ Doubles Championship. Although she never won a Grand Slam or major title, she did make an impression on the tennis court – particularly at Wimbledon. In 1949 she beat the American Gussie Moran in the third round. With her powerful ground stroke and quick footedness, Hoahing defeated the U.S No.4 6-2 7-5 6-3. The match was later described as a ‘perfect display of defensive tennis’.

Cousin Mimi Chan Choong on Gem: “She was a very creative player who loved playing drop shots, but her greatest strength was probably her speed. She was very fast and very light on her feet. She was also a wonderful dancer. She won medals for her ballroom dancing and was a very good tap dancer. She was an accomplished ice skater too.”--
Later in life she owned a nice flower shop in London, near Kensington Gardens.

Hilde Sperling (on left) and Gem at Wimbledon in the late 1930s




Sources:

https://www.tennisforum.com/59-blast-past/412186-little-gem-gem-hoahing.html

From the archive: Remembering "Little Gem" - The Championships, Wimbledon 2017 - Official Site by IBM

Cecil Vivian Ricachard Wong (a cousin of Gem)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gem_Hoahing [Thanks to Wolbo for creating this]

[Thanks to Rollo for this biography]
 

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BARANSKI, RENATA (nee Renata Marcinkowska)
Poland/United States
Born 24 February 1965
Married Andrew Baranski, 23 February 1985
Nickname: "Ren"
[Active 1983-1995.]


Singles

Career High: #110 on 12-November-1990
Won 140 matches-Lost 127
Won the Southern Open in 1994 and 1995
Best result in a slam was the 2R of the 1991 French Open

Best year end rankings:

1989: #135
1990: #152

Doubles

Career High : #91 on 28-September -1992
Won 65 Matches-Lost 83
Best result in a slam was the 2R of the 1991 Australian Open

Having no instruction herself as a child, she hung around the courts, working as a ball girl, hitting balls against a wall at age 12.

Baranski has been playing tennis competitively since she was 14 in Poland, where she was born into an aristocratic family. By age 16, Renata Marcinkowski had captured all the national junior championships.

In 1981 she came to Miami, a member of the Polish team for the World Junior Championships. They didn't do well, but the loss was overshadowed by political upheaval in their homeland.

"The Communists had taken over,'' she said. "There was martial law in Poland. We were too scared to go back.''

On a work-study scholarship, she enrolled in the Nick Bolliettieri Tennis Academy in Florida. There she worked for a year, cleaning bathrooms and other janitorial chores.

From Florida, she enrolled at Oklahoma State University, where she got a tennis scholarship. She was named to the All-America team for two straight years. Baranski earned a bachelor's of science in psychology, graduating in 1987. She also became a naturalized citizen.

"It was at Oklahoma State that I learned to play tennis,'' Baranski recalled. "I had a wonderful coach, Ike Gross. He taught me how to become good, how to play doubles.''

After graduation, she turned pro.

"I played against everybody, except Chrissie (Evert) and Steffi (Graf), on all surfaces,'' Baranski said. "I beat people in the top 20, not the top 10.''

A heel injury in 1992 dealt her a major setback.

It took two years to work up to competition again. She had to enter smaller tournaments.

"I couldn't get wild cards. Sometimes I had to qualify for four or five rounds for even a $10,000 tournament,'' Baranski said. "It's a merry-go-round. It's almost impossible to get back.''

Baranski's choice was teaching while preparing for the circuit. She taught at Tega Cay in Charlotte, North Carolina. Ren was very well regarded as a tennis instructor.

Sources:

"The Long Road Back", by Sarah Spratt Cash. The Charlotte Observer. June 17, 1995
http://www.tennisforum.com/showpost....7&postcount=47

http://www.wtatennis.com/players/player/387/title/renata-baranski

[Thanks to LKK and Mrs Anthropic for this information]
 

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HODDLE-WRIGLEY, FRANCES “Fran” (Frances Mary Hoddle-Wrigley)
Australia (Victoria)
Born 21 May 1904 in Brighton, Melbourne, Victoria
Died 09 May 1982 in Bairnsdale, East Gippsland Shire, Victoria
[Active from as early as 1924 to 1935]

Prominent in the early 1930s. She entered the 1924 Aussie Nationals, not participating again until 1930. Played every Australian National from 1930-1935 except for 1934, making the QF in 1931-32 and the SF in 1933.

[Thanks to Gee Tee for this information]
 

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HODGE, EMILY
Australia (South Australia)
Born 1 March 1871 in Woodville, Adelaide South Australia
Died in 1948
Married Robert John Rutherford on 23 November 1899 in the Congregational Church, Adelaide, South Australia
[Active circa 1890-95]

Emily Hodge was the winner of the women's singles title at the inaugural South Australian Championships tournament in Adelaide in 1891. In the final she beat her younger sister, Marian.

[Thanks to Gee Tee and Newmark for this information]
 

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HODGE, MARION (Marian Isabella Hodge)
Australia (South Australia)
Born 21 November 1872 in Mount Pleasant, Adelaide
Died 31 July 1957 in Queensland
Married Frederick Feuerheerdt on 29 March 1902 in Koonunga, South

RU in the inaugural 1891 South Australian Chmps, losing to her sister Emily in the final

[Thanks to Gee Tee and Newmarl for this infromation]
 

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HODGEMAN, SUE
United States
Born 11 July 1940

From Kalamazoo, Michigan. 20 years old when she won the Western Chmps in 1960. Unusually for her era she had a two-handed backhand.

Our source for date of birth is the USLTA Yearbook And Tennis Guide 1956

[Thanks to Rosamund for the date of birth]
 

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HOGAN, PATTI (Patti St Anne Hogan)
United States
Born 21 December 1949 in San Diego, California
Married Ian McLennan Fordyce, 19 December 1976
[Active 1965-1977]

Notorious for her temper on court. Racquet throwing and cursing were common throughout her career, leading to her being defaulted on at least 1 occasion.

Patti Hogan was a Californian who was ranked among America's top players in the late 60s and early 70s. She was known for great talent, hot temper and a foul mouth. Her antics often angered opponents and brought her own self to tears. There were rumors of an abusive father. She had career wins over Nancy Richey, Olga Morozova, Margaret Court, Evonne Goolagong, Martina Navratilova (at Martina's first Wimbledon) and Virginia Wade.

Hogan had 9 career singles titles and 17 doubles titles. Her career best Slam result in singles was a quarterfinal loss at Wimbledon in 1972 to Chris Evert after defeating #5 Kerry Melville in the 3rd round. She made the round of 16 four times at Wimbledon and another three times at the US Open. In 1969, she and partner Peggy Michel defeated #3 seeds Ann Jones and Francoise Durr to reach the final at Wimbledon where they fell to Margaret Court and Judy Tegart Dalton. She reached the quarterfinals at Slams in women's doubles seven other times.

Patti's best years were 1969-1972. She played on US Federation, Wightman and Bonne Bell Cup teams. She was best on grass courts and especially played well on British soil.

Her last known event was at Wimbledon in 1977, where she played as Mrs Fordyce. Her twitter account reveals she has a son named Patrick. Patti has a strong interest in conservative Catholic issues.

Her career titles are listed below:

Singles

1965 La Jolla d. Dodo Bundy Cheney
1966 La Jolla d. Dodo Bundy Cheney
1968 Phoenix Thunderbird d. Tori Fretz
1968 Southern California Championships d. Fretz
1969 Eastern Grass Courts d. Kristi Pigeon
1970 Kent Championships d. Olga Morozova
1971 Manchester d. Kristein Kemmer
1972 Manchester d. Esme Emanuel
1973 Hoylake d. Sharon Walsh

Doubles

1966 Southern California Championships w/Peggy Michel
1968 US Hard Courts w/ Esme Emanuel
1969 Phoenix Thunderbird w/ Michel
1970 Barranquila w/ Mary Ann Eisel Curtis
1970 Curacao w/Curtis
1970 Caribe Hilton w/ Curtis
1971 Hobart w/ Morozova
1972 Western Province w/ Janine Lieffrig
1973 Akron w/ Sharon Walsh
1973 Sarasota w/ Walsh
1973 Surrey Hard Courts w/ Walsh
1973 Welsh Championships w/ Walsh
1973 Hoylake w/ Walsh
1974 Pensacola w/ Mimi Wikstedt
1974 Lee on Solent w/ Gail Chanfreau
1975 Surrey Hard Courts w/ Greer Stevens
1975 Surrey Grass Courts w/ Linky Boshoff




[Thanks to Preacherfan for this biography]
 

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HOLDER, BERTHA (Bertha Mary Holder)
United Kingdom
Born 07 November 1877 in Yorkshire
Died
Married George Percy Howard Frost, 1915
[Active 1904-1906]

Active as early as 1904, when one finds her in the mixed final at Harrowgate in Yorkshire. Bertha competed at Wimbledon twice-in 1905 and 1906. She made the quarterfinals in 1905. At that stage Connie Wilson took her apart 6-2 6-0. Though entered in the 1906 Championships she scratched before her first match.

*Note we need confirming evidence of marriage.
 
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