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DOUSLIN, NINA (Nina Mataura Douslin)
New Zealand
Born 1864
Married Cornelius O'Leary in 1910
Active in the 1890's.

NZL BDM records show she had a daughter, Gladys Douslin, in 1894 with no record of a father. Note that the name Mataura means “reddish” in Maori-a strong clue she may have had Maori ancestry. An 1891 article lists her as coming “all the way from Blenheim.” Horace Douslin entered the same event and is probably her brother.
 

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DOUST, EDITH (Edith Lucy Doust)
Australia (NSW/Queensland)
Born in 1875 in New South Wales
Died 28 July 1947 in Killara, New South Wales
Married Harry Wolstenholme on 8 January 1902 in the Methodist Church, Stanmore, Sydney
[Active circa 1892-1902]

Edith Doust was an early female graduate of Sydney University. Stanley Doust, the famous tennis player and writer, was her brother.

Harry Wolstenholme was a distinguished lawyer and an ornithologist. See here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Wolstenholme

[Thanks to Gee Tee and Newmark for this information]
 

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DOWDESWELL, SHEILA (nee Sheila Marguerite Paterson)
Kenya/Rhodesia/United Kingdom
Born 24 April 1915 in Hendon, Middlesex
Died 18 March 2008 in Indianapolis
Married (1) Roland Melville Dowdeswell by 1949 French (died 31 May 1956)
Maried (2) Robert “Bob” Evans

Played singles at Wimbledon 6 times. Her singles record at Wimbledon was 4-6.

Year Singles
1951 Second round
1950 First round
1949 Third round
1948 Second round
1937 First round
1936 First round

Stepmother of Demond “Des” Evans. Played French in 1949 as Mrs Dowdeswell. Her son Colin Dowdeswell (born 12 May 1955) and Des won Rhodesian. Sheila, a natural net player, later coached her Colin. According to an Indianapolis tennis magazine Sheila and her husband emigrated to the US in 1980 and became US citizens in 1985. In the US Sheila later taught pro Ginny Purdy.

Sheila, went out to Kenya to marry Roland Dowdeswell and subsequently lived there. Roland was a doctor. One of Sheila and Roland's children was Ian. A second child was Roger. These two boys were born in Nairobi, Kenya. Later, while Roland was working in Cairo, Sheila and Roland had a third son, named Colin (born 12 May 1955 in London). Soon afterwards the family moved to Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe; Rhodesia became Zimbabwe in April 1980)

Some years after Roland's death, Sheila married a gentleman from Rhodesia named Bob Evans. Sheila died in Indianapolis in March 2008.



[Special thanks to her son Colin for his email]
 

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DOYLE, ANNA (nee Anna Morris)
Australia (NSW)
Married Andrew V Doyle circa 1905
Career Span: as early as 1905 and as late as 1925.

'lady champion of the Northern Rivers' circa 1905. Her spouse AV Doyle was a champion player of Northern NSW in the 1900s. He became a NSW selector circa 1910 and later a sportswriter, whose works included "How to improve your tennis" (1935). She is in the 1925 Aussie doubles draw.
 

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DRAFFEN, BEATRICE (nee Beatrice Mary Ann Wood)
United Kingdom
Born 1865
Died 13 July 1962
Married George Algernon Draffen April to June of 1892. (June 1858-13 Sep 1947)
[Active 1892 to 1896]

Often listed as Mrs GE Draffen. Played Wimbledon in 1892, 1894-96 QF in 1894, SF in 1895 and 1896.

She won the North of England Chmps at Scarborough in 1892 and 1894.

Daughter Beatrice born 23 Jul 1893 - Elstree, Hertfordshire, England. Son George Wiliam born circa 1900. In the 1911 census her husband is listed as being 52-7 years older than Beatrice.

From Ackworth in Yorkshire, Beatrice Wood rode with the Badsworth Hunt in that county. She was 97 at the time of her death.
 

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DRAGOMIR, RUXANDRA
Romania
Born 24 October 1972 in Pitesti, Romania.
Married Florin Ilie, 14 March 2001
Career Span: 1990-2005
Height: 1.68 m (5' 6 1⁄4")

Won four singles and five doubles titles during her career. The right-hander reached her highest individual ranking on the WTA Tour on August 25, 1997, when she became the number 15 of the world on the strength of a QF in the French Open, her best singles result in a slam. She is currently the president of Romanian Tennis Federation.

Played as Dragomir-Ilie after marriage.


#567
 

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DRANSFIELD, P
Australia (NSW)

NSW Player circa 1900 - may have played overseas
-one sister seemed to go off the scene after January 1905

An 'N Dransfield' (champion) as well as 'M Dransfield' (R4) and 'Mary Dransfield' (R3) all played in the 1902 Queens Hall table tennis tournament in Sydney to add to the confusion over these women.
 

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DRESCHER, LILIAN
Switzerland
Born 23 May 1965 in Caracas, Venezuela
Height: 5” 4”

#90 in 1984. In Swiss top ten by 1980-she dropped out of the top 100 in 1987 and stopped playing in 1988. Career highlight was winning the 1984 Japan Open.
 

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DREXEL PAUL, ISABEL (nee Isabel Biddle)
United States
Born 1888
Died 1953
Md Anthony Joseph Drexel Paul (1884-8 July 1958) in 29 December 1908 in Philadelphia.
2 sons (AJ Junior and James W) and 2 daughters (Anne and Isabel)

Daughter of Dr Alexander W. Biddle (b. 1856) m. 1879 Anne McKennan (1858-1937) Technically her last name was Paul, but the family always used Drexel Paul to emphasize the connection to the famous Drexel family. Her son was a close friend and classmate of future President Franklin Roosevelt and married FDR’s cousin Margaret Delano.

The Drexel Pauls resided at the estate of Woodcrest in Radnor, PA.

Artist Philip Alexius de Laszlo -- British painter (1869-1937) painted Isabel and Alexander in 1922.

The Biddle family papers are at the University of Delaware
 

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DRURY, GLADYS (Gladys Henderson Drury)
United Kingdom
Born
Died 1 December 1927
Married William Maxwell Aitken, 29 January 1906

From www.thepeerage.com: "Gladys Henderson Drury was the daughter of Maj.-Gen. Charles William Drury and Mary Louise Henderson. She married Sir William Maxwell Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook, son of Reverend William Cuthbert Aitken and Jane Noble, on 29 January 1906 at Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. She died on 1 December 1927 at Stornoway House, St. James's, London, England. Her married name became Aitken. As a result of her marriage, Gladys Henderson Drury was styled as Baroness Beaverbrook on 2 January 1917."
 

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DUBASH, MEHAR
Pakistan
Active in the 1930s.

A Parsi. 3 Parsi women, PG Dinshaw, MH Dinshaw and Meher Dubash were also winning most of the important titles in the Sind Lawn Tennis Championship and North West Indian Tennis championship titles played at Karachi [now in Pakistan] in the period of the late 1930s
 

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DUBIENSKA, WANDA (nee Wanda Nowak)
Poland
Born 12 June 1895
Died 28 November 1968
Married Józef Dubieński before 1924; divorced after 1945

She was Jadwiga Jedrzejowska's biggest rival in Poland. She participated in a foil fencing event at the Olympic Games in 1924, she was also a Polish tennis and skiing champion.
 

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DULDIG, EVA
Australia (Victoria)/Netherlands
Born 1938 in Austria
Married Henri De Jong 28 February 1962 St Kilda Congregation Synagogue
[Active 1955-1965]

[From burwoodbulletin.org/meet-eva-duldig/]
THERE was an episode in my life when I was an international tennis player, which at the time I didn’t consider remarkable because I was a teacher. My priorities at the time were my teaching, my studies (I had started a BA at Melbourne Uni) and then the tennis. The fact that I got to Wimbledon, and how that turned out for me was … a dream; it wasn’t anything that I’d actually planned, it just happened that way.
EVA de Jong-Duldig is a person of diverging interests, many of which were inherited from her parents. Eva’s father Karl was an eminent sculptor as well as a sportsman, and from him she took his sporting prowess (he played international soccer for Hakoah Wien in the 1920s and was later one of Austria’s top tennis players). Her mother Slawa, who invented the modern foldable umbrella in 1929, often formed a bedrock in the family’s sometimes fraught journey from Vienna to Australia. Her father’s passion for tennis was more than partly responsible for the family’s eventual survival. After the Anschluss of Austria by Nazi Germany in 1938 he left for Switzerland under the pretext of playing a tournament, later persuading an official to enable his family to “visit” him there, thus evading the Holocaust that decimated so many Jewish families.

Eva’s introduction to tennis began during the family’s wartime internment in Tatura (180 kilometres north of Melbourne). Karl cut down one of the wooden racquets he had brought with him for three-year-old Eva and soon she was trying to hit the balls he threw. The “lessons” continued when in 1942 they moved to Melbourne. Eva remembers hitting lots of “air” balls at first, but soon her hand-eye coordination improved and she connected more than she missed. Practising at home also required the development of ball control, for to avoid a neighbour’s wrath Eva quickly learnt to half-volley and volley the balls “… to stop them escaping onto the garden behind me. Coping with these difficulties quickened my reflexes and maybe that was why the half volley and volley later became strengths in my game.”
She continued to develop her tennis skills at school (Korowa). When playing most lunch times with her friends, she remembers, “As I had trouble finishing my thick brown bread cheese sandwiches quickly, I would play with a sandwich in one hand and a racquet in the other”. As she improved, Karl invented drills to help her. They would keep the ball in play as long as possible and occasionally play games. For a long time she hardly won any games; then one day, when she was 15, she excitedly told her mother that she had “beaten Daddy 6–4”. It was a turning point and she never lost another set to her father.

The family had by now moved to Glen Iris, not far from the Kooyong courts. It was a tennis-rich environment for Eva. With his tennis pedigree Karl was able to ask Harry Hopman, captain of the Australian Davis Cup team, for advice about training Eva. By 1954 Eva had won the singles events in the under-17 age groups in junior tournaments at Glen Iris, Elsternwick and Kooyong. She was soon included in Victorian state junior and open teams and began to travel to interstate tournaments. However, heeding advice that there was no future for women’s tennis in Australia, Eva began a diploma of Physical Education at the University of Melbourne, although tennis remained important to her. Indeed, in June 1955 she reached the semi-finals of the Victorian hardcourt championships, attracting enthusiastic coverage in The Argus. “Eva from Austria shocks the stars”.
In 1956 she was the Victorian Schoolgirl Champion and together with Elizabeth (Libby) Court won the Doubles. Yet her life continued in divergent directions: her tennis training was focused on competing in the 1957 Maccabiah Games in Israel (where she won the women’s singles without losing a set), whilst in the same year she became the physical education teacher at Mount Scopus College.

For the next few years tennis took a back seat to her teaching career. “I thoroughly enjoyed the work and had an excellent rapport with my students, but it was physically and mentally demanding and I often returned home utterly drained”, Eva remembered in her award winning book Driftwood. Even so, she continued to play for Victoria in interstate matches, arranging time off from teaching to compete. “Wimbledon lived up to all my expectations”

In 1961 Eva took six months unpaid leave to fulfil her dream of playing at Wimbledon. She remembers a car flying the purple-and-green Wimbledon flag picking her up from her host family on the first day. People stared into the car as if she were royalty, and once inside the courts she was besieged by schoolgirl autograph hunters. Her first round opponent was Renata Ostermann, a top-ranking German player. “I was playing for my country, my family and my heritage,” she recalls in Driftwood, “I ran through the first set comfortably. A small group of other German players had gathered at courtside and at every change of end they gave my opponent advice. After losing the second set, and at 1–0 to me in the third, I decided to put an end to their interference. As we changed ends, I walked over to the group and in German said, ‘Wir spielen diesen Satz ohne Hilfe, bitte’ (‘We’ll play this set without help, please.’). Their mouths dropped open and there was not a murmur for the rest of the match. My opponent was thoroughly unnerved, as much by my German language skills as by my tennis, and I ended up winning the third set comfortably. Buoyed by this win, I also won the next match. Meantime she and her South African doubles partner, Marlene Gerson, reached the quarter-finals of the doubles.

“The quarter-final was played on Stadium Court One, where the applause from the adjacent centre court was clearly audible. If we won, we would play the semi-final on this hallowed court. It never happened. On day 10, I was out of the tournament, having achieved far more than I had ever expected and with lots of impressive newspaper clippings to add to my scrapbook.” Other tournaments were scheduled for Eva’s overseas trip, the last of which was to defend her title at the 6th Maccabiah Games in Israel where a life-changing surprise awaited her. She was introduced to Henri de Jong, a member of the Dutch team. Five days later she and Henri were engaged!

Married on 28 February 1962 at the St Kilda Hebrew Congregation synagogue, the couple departed to live in Holland, where in 1962 Eva became tennis champion of The Netherlands. Again in 1962 and 1963 she competed at Wimbledon, and was also No.1 player for The Netherlands in the first Federation Cup held at Queen’s Club in 1963, playing against Billie Jean Moffitt (King) in the quarter-final. After the birth of her first child [Tania, born in 1964] the young family returned to Melbourne in 1965, and following the arrival of two more children Eva found it difficult to keep up her tennis.

Gradually new interests and passions took over her time: she completed a BA at Melbourne University and worked as a recreation consultant, writer and a designer of children’s play spaces. In 2002 she founded the Duldig Studio (see article in March 2018 issue #148), a not-for-profit public museum and art gallery in the former family home in East Malvern, which displays the work and legacy of Karl and Slawa Duldig (www.duldig.org.au).
In 2017 her family biography Driftwood was published, telling the story of three generations of her family, their escape from Nazi Europe and final settlement in Melbourne. To write it was a compulsion, says Eva. The intention was to complement the museum and to put on record the achievements of her parents. The Duldig Studio and Driftwood, and the causes that Eva has and continues actively to support into her eighth decade, are testament to her tireless nature, which perhaps is her mother’s abiding legacy to her. ♦





Sources:
Interview with Eva De Jong-Duldig, June 2018 at burwoodbulletin.org/meet-eva-duldig/
Issue 151 23/11/2018
Eva De Jong-Duldig Driftwood – Escape and survival through art Arcadia, 2017
Ashley Browne and Dashiel Lawrence, People of the Boot, Judith Buckridge, The Art of Tennis 2018
Driftwood can be purchased through bookstores, or from the Duldig Studio: duldig.org.au/store

http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/fa...820-1j3n0.html

[Thanks to Rollo and Rosamund for this information]
 
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