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de PRELLE de la NIEPPE, MADELEINE (Madeleine Germaine Augusta Ghislaine de Prelle de la Nieppe)
Belgium/Netherlands
Born 5 February 1893
Died 4 June 1960
Married Ewout Prins van Westdorpe (1.11.1879-14.6.1950), 10 November 1926
[Active from at least 1923 to 1935]

Winner: 1923 Swiss Championships, 1935 Château-d'Oex

A Mme de Prelle won in Gstaad in 1925, but we don't know her identity. If it was Madeleine it would be Mlle de Prelle, and not Mme, since she wasn't married until 1926.




[Thanks to Jimbo and Newmark for this information]
 

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LUXTON, LYNNE (Dorthy Lynne Luxton)
New Zealand
Born 17 January 1929
[Active from at least 1953 to 1955]

Miss Luxton was ranked #10 in New Zealand in 1953.

Played singles Wimbledon 1955 losing to Angela Mortimer in 1st round.

Described in 1955 as stenographer

New Zealand Electoral rolls showing her as living in Riccarton Canterbury most recently 1957.

Sources Ancestry? | Genealogy, Family Trees & Family History Records
Date of birth comes from UK Incoming passenger lists 1878 to 1960.

[Thanks to Rosamund for this information]
 

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HALL, Mrs A. A.
Great Britain
[Active 1912-1923]

Easily confused with Mrs E. S. (Tessa) Hall.

There is a good chance she was the wife of tennis player Arthur Alexander Hall. He lived 1862-1912. According to Mark Ryan Mr Hall attended Cambridge University, England. Joined the Madras Educational Service in 1887. Later Principal of Madras Teachers’ College.

He participated in English events in 1905 and 1906. In his will he left his estate to his widow Mary Nield Hall. Could this Mary Barrett (Nield was a middle name) be Mrs A. A. Hall the tennis player? Mr Hall and Mary Nield Barrett were wed in Madras on the 28 of February 1895. She was born 14 July 1864 in Littleborough, Lancashire, England. Her father's occupation as a "scholar" might have put her in same circles as Mr Hall.

This Mary Barrett lived in England as late as 1891 according to a census.

Sources:

Archive - Draws Archive : A.A. Hall - 2015 Wimbledon Championships Website - Official Site by IBM

Arthur Alexander Hall

British probate records

[Thanks to Newmark and Rollo for this information]
 

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BEAVEN, LINDSEY
Great Britain
Born January 1950 in Friern Barnet, England
[Active 1969-1978]

Made the 4R in singles at Wimbledon in 1971 and 1975.

On tour in England as early as 1969, when she won Lee-om-Solent, a minor event.

Unusual in obtaining a Doctorate of Divinity in 1973. That same year was perhaps her best on tour, winning the Rothman's Sutton title, The Athens International, and the Greek Filothei in singles. It was also her Wightman Cup debut.

Lindsey was the North of England winner in 1974.

With money to be made in America she spent most of her time from the mid 1970s coaching in the United States and playing World Team Tennis. In 1977, the year she won an event at Orange Beaven as ranked as high as #64 in the world. Her highest British ranking was #4.

Beaven was later the head WTA tour director (1979-1983) and the author of Getting Started, a guide on how to navigate the WTA Tour.. As of 2008 she is a self described "Psychotherapist in the Jungian Tradition." She is residing in California.




Sources:

Beaven, Linsey. Getting Started: The WTA Guide to Professional Tennis. 1986

Hedges, Martin. The Concise Dictionary of Tennis. 1978. page 23.

Archive - Draws Archive : Lindsey Beaven - 2015 Wimbledon Championships Website - Official Site by IBM

Lindsey Beaven et Veronica Burton - Le blog des archives du tennis feminin

http://www.drlindseybeavenmft.com/ [her professional website]

https://www.linkedin.com/in/drlindseybeavenmft

https://books.google.com/books?id=k32mAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA239&lpg=PA239&dq=lindsey+beaven+tennis&source=bl&ots=SA7LMyaDNi&sig=vLM3jo4jAsUGzOR-JvbzGVY2zek&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjBsdWU1YXMAhXG2D4KHQR4APM4FBDoAQhFMAc#v=onepage&q=lindsey%20beaven%20tennis&f=false

[Thanks to Rollo for this information and to Binoxial for the photo]
 

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ANDREWS, ENID (Enid Margaret Seymour Andrews)
Great Britain
Born 23 April 1922 in Lambeth, London
Married Derek Lewis Q1 (January to March) 1956 in Tonbridge, Kent
[Active 1947-1951]

Played singles Wimbledon 1948 to 1951 and French 1951. Best result was last 16 Wimbledon 1950-losing to eventual champion Louise Brough.



Sources:

www.ancestry .co.uk
Various Wimbledon programmes

Archive - Draws Archive : Enid Andrews - 2015 Wimbledon Championships Website - Official Site by IBM

Source 1939 register from findmypast

[Thanks to Rosamund for this information]
 

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AUBET, MARIA-JOSE
Spain
Born 30 April 1943
[Active from 1966-1970]

She had a membership in a Barcelona tennis club.

Played singles French Championships 1966 and 1967, and Wimbledon 1967 winning 1 match. Withdrew from singles 1968 French Championships.

Miss Aubet attempted to qualify for the main draw at Wimbledon as late as 1970.

Sources:

Date of birth from ITFtennis.com
Archive - Draws Archive : Maria-Jose Aubet - 2015 Wimbledon Championships Website - Official Site by IBM

[Thanks to Rosamund for this information]
 

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SIMON, LOLITA
United Kingdom/India
Born circa 1910
Died ????
Married Raymond Langdon Carter Foottit on 6 October 1933 in Saint Paul’s Cathedral, Calcutta-divorced or she was deceased by 1946.
[Active circa 1930-40]

Lolita was the daughter of Mr and Mrs E.C. Simon of Calcutta and The Rookery, Roehampton. Her mother also took part in a number of lawn tennis tournaments in India, forming a notable doubles partnership with Jenny Sandison.

Raymond Foottit, a graduate of Oxford University in England, married for a second time in 1946, so by then either he and Lolita had divorced or she might have died.

[Thanks to Newmark for this information]
 

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ROGERS, "VICKY" (Janet Victoria Rogers)
United States
Born 27 August 1949 in Brooklyn, New York City, New York.
Married Earl McEvoy 1971 and has 4 children and 2 grandchildren as of April 2015.
[Active 1966-1968]

Played singles US Championships 1966 to 1968 and Wimbledon 1968.

Rogers McEvoy reached the finals of the National Girls’ 18 & Under Championships at the Philadelphia Cricket Club in 1967. She also excelled at the Longwood tournament, taking a set from Margaret Smith Court.

Playing Wimbledon in 1968 (her lone journey to the greatest event in tennis) was a special thrill.

“Playing Owen Davidson and Billie Jean King with my doubles partner Roy Barth at Wimbledon was one of the highlights of my career,” Rogers McEvoy said. “We were brought to our matches in a big black car, and as we got out English school girls, who didn’t know who we were, asked for our autographs.”
At the dawn of the open tennis era in 1968, teenager Vicky Rogers walked onto Wimbledon’s fabled No. 1 Court with her partner Roy Barth for their match against defending mixed doubles champions, Billy Jean King and Owen Davidson. Although she lost that day, you can still hear the youthful pride as she recalls “actually playing really well, and being relieved at not being embarrassed.”

At Bournemouth that summer, she took a set from eventual winner and future Wimbledon champ Virginia Wade. At the end of the year she was ranked #2 in the US. It was an amateur only ranking that year, excluding Billie Jean King and Rosie Casals, but still an impressive achievement.

She grew up in Rye, New York. In summers, she and her three siblings spent their days at Manursing Island Club. At age 9, Rogers McEvoy played in a tennis clinic led by John Vinton, who coaxed his young players with free Cokes from the snack bar if their shots hit his target. She won a lot of free Cokes.

Her parents supported the rapid development of their daughter’s tennis. After ninth grade, she left her family and Rye Country Day to attend The Bishop’s School in La Jolla, California. There, she took full advantage of the endless summers and continued to improve, playing in the fiercely competitive California junior tennis circuit. Along the way, she met her great friend and fellow-player Val Zeigenfuss and many others. La Jolla native, Karen Hantze Susman, who won the Wimbledon singles title in 1962, became her hero.

At that 1968 Wimbledon, she recalls getting paid a whopping £50 stipend, since she was still an amateur, and exchanging her player’s tickets for a flat in London, a far cry from today's rich professional payouts.

While she was fulfilling her tennis dreams, another dream developed. Returning home, arguably at the top of her game and poised for more court success, she left it all behind, confidently telling her parents that she’d decided to become a doctor.

When asked about her decision, Vicky said, “I found myself as a player being an entertainer; it was one-dimensional, and I wanted to do more with my life; it wasn’t the way I wanted to go.”

A self-described “all-or-nothing person” and armed with the discipline and problem-solving skills cultivated through her tennis career, she became a pre-med student at Hofstra University.

In 1971, she married a hometown boy, Earl McEvoy and moved to Cambridge to attend Harvard Medical School. The couple have four children and two grandchildren. Dr. McEvoy is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Chief of Pediatrics at Mass General West Medical Group. She is also an author; one of her titles, “Taming Your Child’s Temper Tantrums”, might have been helpful to the parents of another local New York left-hander, who became a Wimbledon champion.

As a pediatrician, she recognizes the perilous position of kids today who get into the sport at such a young age. “I worry about children going exclusively into one sport. With tennis, you must commit so early; academics can suffer too.”

She cautions players against overuse of certain muscles, which can lead to chronic injury. The risk ofoveruse has been exacerbated by tennis’s evolution into a sport where topspin, which can cause problems particularly with wrists and elbows, is dominant and players are continually trying to “brutalize” the ball.

Vicky was inducted into the USTA Eastern Tennis Hall of Fame in 2015.





Sources:

http://rareburghers.blogspot.com/

http://www.eastern.usta.com/news/victoria_rogers_mcevoy_2015_eastern_hall_of_fame_inductee/

http://ryerecord.com/features/after-rye-vicky-rogers-mcevoy-still-at-the-top-of-her-game.html

Source for birth details and ranking 1969 USTA Yearbook.

[Thanks to Rosamund for this information]
 

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NEPEAN, ANNIE (Annie Blanch Nepean)
United Kingdom/India
Born in 1882 in York, England
Died 28 July 1968
Married (Sir) Hugh Byard Clayton in 1915 in Kensington, England
[Active circa 1918-35]

In the years circa 1925-30, Annie Clayton enjoyed a good deal of success at some of the Indian tournaments. After her husband was knighted, she was styled as Lady Annie Clayton. There is no 'e' in her second name.

[Thanks to Newmark for this information]
 

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BRASHER, "KATE" (Katrina J. Brasher)
Great Britian
Born 02 August 1962 in LOndon
Married Edward V. Sabisky September 1990 Kensington and Chelsea.
Has 6 children.
[Active 1978-1986]

Daughter of Shirley Bloomer, the 1957 French Championships winner. She followed in her mother's footsteps by playing tennis but couldn't crack the top 100. Her best result at Wimbledon was the second round in 1980.

For her mother Shirley see: http://www.tennisforum.com/25177145-post212.html




Sources:

Archive - Draws Archive : Kate Brasher - 2015 Wimbledon Championships Website - Official Site by IBM

Jackie Fayter et Kate Brasher - Le blog des archives du tennis feminin

Ancestry? | Genealogy, Family Trees & Family History Records

[Thanks to Rollo and Rosamund for this information]
 

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CHMYREVA, "NATASHA" (Natalia Yurievna Chmyreva) (Наталья Юрьевна Чмырёва)
Soviet Union
Born 28 May 1958 in Moscow, Russia (then the Soviet Union)
Died 16 August 2015 in Moscow, Russia
[Active 1973-1983]

From Moscow. Her raw talent led many to compare her to Martina Navratilova. Sadly, a volatile mixture of politics and personality resulted in Chmyreva abandoning tennis.

Her game was lovely. She had the ability to boom her groundstrokes with pretty good topspin and follow them to the net for easy volleys. Her serve was hard and accurate-from Jem, A poster from the Blast who saw Chmyreva in person
"I played aktivnyi tennis: fast and furious. With aggression"-Natasha's own description of her game in a 2007 Tennis article.
As a youth her ambitious parents Yury and Svetlana trained her for stardom. Svetlana ran the Dynamo Club in Moscow. The term dynamo was apt, for after starting tennis at the age of seven her trajectory was ever upwards as a girl.

Barely 15, she qualified for the main draw of the French Open in 1973.

In 1975 the young Russian won the junior Australian, Wimbledon, US Open crowns becoming the first junior holder of 3/4 of the grand slams. A junior Grand Slam was never possible because she wasn't sent to Roland Garros. She successfully defended her Wimbledon girl's crown in 1976

Though most of 1975 was spent in the juniors, the 16 year old reached the semifinals of the women's Australian Open, where Martina Navratilova edged her out 6-4 6-4.

In 1976 she beat top Rosie Casals and Sue Barker, also making #2 Evonne Goolagong go to a 6-3 third set to beat her. This was just her first full year on tour. She finished the year #2 in the Soviet Union behind Olga Morozova. Another highlight was her quarterfinal finish at the US Open. In that match world #1 Chris Evert won 6-1 6-2.

The very next year in 1977 the Soviet Union pulled its players from international events due to politics early in the year, refusing to participate in sports where it might face South Africans. Natasha was ranked #13 in the world at the time. The plug was pulled while she was in the United States on the tough Virginia Slims tour. in her 3 events Natasha was 6-3, making 2 semifinals. The Soviets did allow their players to compete in World Team Tennis. Traveling city to city with no home base and often booed or called names due to politics they had no control over, the Soviet team finished last in the league with a 12-32 record but earned hard cash for the communists. Chmyreva again displayed her prodigious talent by blowing world #1 Chris Evert off the court in a one set WTT match.

In addition Natasha was at a disadvantage due to her rivalry with Morozova, who had connections Chmyreva lacked. Rumor had it this stemmed from run-ins between Yury (Natasha's father) and Morozova. As Olga effectively ran women's tennis in the Soviet Union she could pick who to grant opportunities and resources to.

Even with almost two years of no top level competition Chmyreva's star potential shown brightly when the Soviets went to Australia late in 1978 for the Federation Cup. With Morozova the Soviets reached the semifinals in the team competition. Not allowed out again until the 1979 Federation Cup in Spain, she was destroyed 6-0 6-1 by Tracy Austin in the semifinals. With the 1980 Olympic Games being held in Moscow the Soviets had little interest in tennis, a sport not brought back to the Olympics until 1988.

Other issues complicated matters. Natasha was called "too Western" and a "hippie" for wearing her hair long. Her temper easily flared up on and off the court. It all bears a remarkable resemblance to Martina Navatilova. Unlike Martina, Chmyreva didn't opt to defect. Not allowed outside the Soviet Union again after Madrid in 1979, she was limited to all-Soviet events. In 1980 she was banned for a year from any tournaments at all. Disheartened, she gave up tennis for good in 1983.

In 1985 Natasha earned a journalism degree from the University of Moscow.





Sources:

Bychanova, Natalia. "The champion That Tennis Lost." http://tennis-buzz.com/the-champion-that-tennis-lost/

"The First Revolution". Tennis ; May2007, Vol. 43 Issue 4, p52

1977 World of Tennis, page 277.
1980 World of Tennis, page 303.

https://www.tennisforum.com/59-blast-past/185731-natasha-chmyreva.html

The first 'trivalry': Before Novak Djokovic, there was Natasha Chmyreva | OregonLive.com

Archive - Draws Archive : Natasha Chmyreva - 2015 Wimbledon Championships Website - Official Site by IBM
 

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EVERT, JEANNE (Jeanne C. Evert)
United States
Born 05 Octoberr 1957
Married Brahm Dubin in 1979. He died in September 2006.
Height: 5' 1"
Nicknames: "The Other Evert". "Bubbles"
[Active 1973-1978]

Solid like her famous older sister Chris, Jeannie had some big wins, most notably against Margaret Court at the Virginia Slims Championships in 1972. Only 15, Jeanne scored a big upset as Court cramped in a dramtic third set. Jeannie also had a win over Rosie Casals in her first US Open in 1973.

Santorofan posted about her that:

Though she was extremely consistant, physically she not only lacked height, but speed. Personality-wise, it also seems probable that she lacked Chris's burning intense ambition/competitive desire. In an old interview, I recall her stating that her goal in life was simply to be happy...nothing wrong with that, but it's normally not a quality which Grand Slam champions are made of.
Possessing a two-handed backhand like Chris, her game was overall more defensive. Jeanne was toughest on clay.

Representing the US in 1974, she had a 4-0 Fed Cup record in singles, including a win over Dianne Fromholtz in the final.

She also had a good '78 US Open, making it to the third round, losing to eventual finalist Shriver 6-2 7-5.

Incredibly good humored about constantly being compared to Chris, Jeanne had to put up with inflated expectations and often open disappointment from fans expecting a carbon copy of her sister. A 1976 interview by Tony Kornheiser makes it clear that by 1976 she realized a top tier ranking on the tour wasn't going to happen.

"When I tell him my goal is to be happy, it just blows his mind", Jeanne on being asked by her father what her goal was.
By all accounts she found happiness with husband Brad Dubin. They had two children. She has been a teaching pro at Delray

Jeanne worked with Jennifer Capriati until she was 11 years old.

Jeanne in 1973 with her sister Chris. They were often doubles partners together on the USTA circuit that year.





Links and Sources:

https://www.tennisforum.com/59-blast-past/112379-jeanne-evert.html

Kornheiser, Tony. "Jeanne Evert's Goal Is Just To Be Happy." Sarasota Herald-Tribune - September 12, 1976, page 35.
https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1755&dat=19760912&id=4boqAAAAIBAJ&sjid=O2cEAAAAIBAJ&pg=5028,4619778&hl=en

Liechtenstein, Grace A Long Way Baby. 1974.

Archive - Draws Archive : Jeanne Evert - 2015 Wimbledon Championships Website - Official Site by IBM

http://www.fedcup.com/en/players/player/profile.aspx?playerid=20003497

[Thanks to Rollo and Santorofan for this information]
 

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HUGGINS, "MOLLY" (Muriel Cecilia Green)
Great Britain
Born 12 February 1907 in Sigapore
Died 11 September 1981 in Westminster, England
Married John Huggins in 1929 in Singapore.
[Active circa 1930-35]

Molly Huggins was notably runner-up in the women’s singles event at the Singapore Championships in 1934. She and her diplomat husband, John, sometimes took part in mixed doubles events together. For more on her and him, see below.

From the London ‘Times’, 14 September 1981:

Lady Huggins

Lady Muriel Huggins, the former wife of Sir John Huggins, G.C.M.G., M.C., Governor of Jamaica from 1943 to 1950, died in London on September 11 at the age of 74. She was educated in Scotland and at Roedean School, Brighton, although much of her early life was spent in Malaya where her father was in the colonial service. Always a personality in her own right, she enthusiastically mastered at an early age the Malay tongue, but equally enjoyed an opportunity to test her horsemanship on the polo field. In 1929 she married Sir John Huggins, by whom she had three daughters.

After a series of posts in Malaya, the Caribbean and in Washington, D.C., Sir John was appointed Governor of Jamaica in 1943. Lady Huggins – “Lady Molly” as she was known to all – immediately began to develop a warm and trusting relationship with the Jamaican people, which she retained through the remainder of her life.

Never one to be daunted by obstacles in her path, she almost singlehandedly organised the establishment of the Jamaican Federation of Women, an island-wide movement for the improvement of social services and economic conditions for women and children. By 1950, when Sir John retired, the federation had over 20,000 members and was a significant political and social force on the island.

During her tour in Jamaica, Lady Huggins worked vigorously to promote understanding between the Caribbean Islands and the Northern Hemisphere countries. She often lectured in America and in Europe on both the desirability and the inevitability of multi-racial societies. On her return to Britain in 1950 she became active in Conservative Party politics and contested the West Dunbartonshire seat in the 1955 general election. Although defeated and never again a parliamentary candidate, she remained actively involved in political life as deputy chairman of the Conservative Commonwealth Council and chairman of its West Indies Group.

She loved to travel and her friends welcomed her in many parts of the world. Her most remarkable trip was in 1964, across the Soviet Union and China without guide or interpreter. As in so many other circumstances in her life, her ability to communicate easily by a smile or a gesture saw her through with no difficulty.

She was the founder and chairman of the Metropolitan Housing Trust which has built over 3,000 homes in London and the East Midlands, many for commonwealth citizens. Her last public appearance was on May 13th this year when she welcomed the Queen to the dedication of a new housing development in Wood Green, London.

In 1967 her memoirs, entitled Too Much To Tell, were published by William Heinmann.

For a Life magazine article from 1950 on Lady Molly Huggins, with several photos of her and her family, see here: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=...ge&q=l&f=false

Sources:

https://family-tree.cobboldfht.com/people/view/1707


[Thanks to Newmark for this information]
 

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BIDELEUX, MARY (Mary Jacqueline Bideleux)
France/United Kingdom
Born 24 February 1903 in Marseilles
Died in 2002 in Gloucester, England
Married William John McKendrick Warden on 30 December 1928 in Singapore
[Active circa 1922-1940]

Mary Warden's greatest lawn tennis successes came at the Singapore Championships, especially in the mixed doubles event, where she often partnered her husband, who was also born in France.

[Thanks to Newmark for this information]
 

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BALLING, PIA
Denmark
Born 20 June 1940
Married Stockmann by 1970 (later divorced?)
Height: 5' 5"
[Active 1958-1968]

From Vedbaek , north of Copenhagen. She first appears at #7 in the Danish National rankings in 1958. In 1960 she became the Danish #1. She could ve volatile at times, at least in 1961. That year at Manchester she put on a display of line calling and crying on court vs Susan Butt. Butt lost the match and "blew up at her in the locker room."

She was soon residing in America as a college student. A 1962 article from the the Troy Times Record describes her:

'Miss Balling is picture pretty. She is 5'5", weighs about 120 pounds, has clear, blue eyes, light blond hair and a winsome smile. In a dark blue and white print dress, she looks as if she stepped from the cover of a leading fashion magazine. Unaffected by fame, and friendly, Pia reminds person of "the girl next door," the strickingly pretty one.'

Played singles US Championships 1962 to 1964 winning 1 match in 1964. Also played doubles Wimbledon 1961 to 1963 and 1967. Pia was the Danish National champion from 1960 to 1963 and won again in 1966 and 1968.

Apparently married to a Mr Stockmann by 1970, her daughter Merete Balling-Stockmann (born in in 1970) later played Federation Cup for Denmark in 1990.

Later author and businesswomen resident in USA.

An old expression says that to be wise about life you have to at least have traveled the world, owned a restaurant, and written a book.
I have done it all successfully, finally found the balance in life and experience every day how to be happy.
Pia Balling
Photo from around 2016



Sources

Date of Birth from Fed Cup Profiles.

http://www.youramazingpower.com/ (Pia's website)

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_book_1?ie=UTF8&text=Pia+Balling&search-alias=books&field-author=Pia+Balling&sort=relevancerank (a list of her books)

The Times Record (from Troy, New York). September 22 1962. Page 9.

http://www.fedcup.com/en/players/player/profile.aspx?playerid=20006890

Other info from Linkedin and google.

[Thanks to Rosamund for this information]
 

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DREW-BEAR, ANDREINA (nee Andreina Pietri)
Venezuela
Born in 1930 in Caracas, Venezuela
Married Thomas Drew-Bear by 1950
[Active 1950-1952]

Daughter of Andrés Pietri and Luisa Teresa de Montemayo. Her sister Alicia was later the first lady of Venezuela.

Played singles 1950 US Championships

1951 described as housewife.

"When I flub a" shot here [in the US]. I swear in Spanish. Back home. I let off steam in English", she said in a 1952 interview. The Salt Lake City feature quotes her coach Elwood Cooke, who said her best shot was her forehand. The paper speculated that this "Latin invader" might be the next Gussie Moran, a tennis sex symbol from the late 1940s who had turned pro by 1952.

Could Venezuelan Olmpic Sailor John Drew-Bear by her son? As her was born is 1955 it is possible, though unproven.

There is a Andreina Pietri tennis Centre in San Felipe Venezuela apparently named in her honor.

Sources:

"Venezulean VIP". The Salt Lake Tribune 25 May 1952· Page 57 [included photos]

Ancestry? | Genealogy, Family Trees & Family History Records
US departing passenger and crew lists 10th September 1952 for husbands name. 25th December 1951 for job.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Drew-Bear

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Drew-Bear
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alicia_Pietri

[Thanks to Rosamund for this information]
 

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GONGORA, "LULU" (María de Lourdes Góngora Barba)
Mexico
Born 23 October 1946
Name variants: Lucia, Lourdes.
[Active 1963-1970]

Growing up playing for the Mixcoac Club in Mexico City. María de Lourdes Góngora Barba was prominent from a young age. Esteban Reyes was her coach from when she was eight to sixteen.

Always using the family name of Gongora rather than a hyphenated Gongora Barba, she more than one nickname. "Lulu" was most common, but Gongora was also listed under Lourdes and Lucia (per the Fed Cup web site).

Played singles 1967 French Championships and Fed Cup 1969. In 1970 it was anounced she would attend NJC on a tennis scholarship. It's unclear if she ever attended, as a shoulder injury prematurely ended her professional tennis career.

Her international resume (self-provided)

1966: Finalist Blue and Gray Doubles Tennis Tournament, Montgomery Alabama
1966: Finalist in doubles and mixed, Bitsy Grant Tennis Tournament, Atlanta, Georgia.
1966: Finalist in doubles, V International Youth Tournament, Mexico, D. F. Pareja: Lourdes Diaz Ponce.
1966: Finalist in doubles, International Championship of Mexico. Couple: Elena Subirats.
1967: Champion doubles and singles finalist, "Conde Reus" International Championship partnering with Alice Tym of U.S.A. in Spain.
1967: Champion doubles and singles finalist, International Championship Villards, Switzerland, couples with Mabel Vrankovich of Argentina..
1968: Finalist in doubles, Blue and Gray Tennis Tournament, Montgomery, Ala. Couple: Mary McLean U. S. A.
1968: Finalist in singles and doubles, Southern Championships, Birmingham, Ala. Couple: Mary McLean.
1968: Singles and Doubles Champion, Tennessee Valley Invitational, Chattanooga Tenn. Couple: Mary McLean.
1968: Doubles finalist. International Championship of Mexico City.
1968: Fourth place in the Olympics in Mexico. Guadalajara, Jal.

1969: Champion doubles and singles finalist in the International Tournament in Mexico City.
1969: Finalists consolation tournament, "Federation Cup" along with Elena Subirats and Patricia Montano, who played in Athens, Greece.

1970 and 1971 retired from tournaments due to shoulder injury.
1972: Member of the team that represented Mexico in the tournament "International Federation Cup" with Yolanda Ramirez and Elena Subirats, played in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Wins in singles: Madonna Schacht, player No. 5 of Australia. Val Ziegenfuss, No. 4 of U.S.A. and Peggy Moore Junior US Champion

Doubles wins: Helga Nielsen and Trudy Groenman, No. 6 in the world. Eva and Ingrid Lunquist Lofdal, No. I of Sweden. Monique Salfati and Evelyn Torras France. Jane Lehane and Madonna Schacht of Australia.

Sources:

http://www.clubmixcoac.com/publish/article_68.shtml

Fed Cup website.

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/43400223/ [information provided by Lulu herself in September 2005].

[Thanks to Rollo and Rosamund for this information]
 
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