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CURLEY, DOROTHY
Ireland
Born 10 March 1919 in Dublin
Died 23 December 2005
Married Ralph Ince on 9 February 1944 in Star of the Sea Church, Sandymount, County Dublin
[Active circa 1939-65]

Dorothy (Curley) Ince enjoyed success at lawn tennis not only in Ireland but also in places such as Aden and Malaysia, where her army husband's postings took her.

[Thanks to Newmark for this information]
 

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CLARKE, ANGELA (Angela K.B. Clarke)
Great Britain
Born circa 1932
Married Findlay
Active circa 1950-60.

Angela was from the North of Ireland, so she would have been entitled to hold both a British and an Irish passport.

[Thanks to Newmark for this information]
 

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KIRKPATRICK, EILEEN
Great Britain

Born circa 1932
Married Dundee
[Active circa 1952-62]

Eileen was from the North of Ireland, so she would have been entitled to hold both a British and an Irish passport.
 

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SEARSTON, NANCY
Australia (NSW)
[Active in 1962]

She was from Newcastle in New South Wales. Her mother Beryl Searston was a district tennis player in the 1930s.

Entered Aussie in 1962. Probably equal to the Nancy Fay Searston, sales clerk, on the 1963 electoral rolls from Cessnock, New South Wales.

Source:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/140300153/15236597


[Thanks to Rollo for this information]
 

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MOELLER, "EVELYN" (nee Lilian Evelyn Brown)
Great Britain
Born 10 April 1916
Died 06 June 2015 in her hundredth year at Troutbeck Nursing Home Ilkley.
Married Claude "Curly" Gascoinge Moeller Q3 (July to September) of 1939 in Yorkshire
[Active circa 1950-1960]

Wimbledon record (entered 1950-1952 and 1954 to 1956)


Singles: 0-4
Doubles: 4-4
Mixed: 2-3

Yorshire player noted for her doubles play with Barbara Behr, and for playing the first televised match at Wimbledon.


The Ilkley great gran who featured in Wimbledon's first televised match

by Andrea Hardaker. June 26, 2008

A great-grandmother from Ilkley has told how she played in the first ever televised match at Wimbledon in 1952.

Evelyn Moeller, 92, challenged the legendary American Maureen Little Mo' Connolly, who won the Singles Championship title three times at the famous courts in the 1950s.
Evelyn was defeated by the Ladies Champion 6-2, 6-0 in 1952 but managed to secure a place at the then amateur event for a further eight years between 1950 and 1960.
She told Wharfedale Newspapers; "I don't remember the match being televised but I'm sure it looked better than it felt."

Little Mo was a fabulous player - she was very fast and she hit that ball very hard indeed! But she was also a lovely person and I really enjoyed the matches I played against her. "Back then we were all amateurs at Wimbledon but there were some very good players indeed. Wimbledon was such a lovely place to play and I remember we were all treated incredibly well. We had our hair done in between games and had our own physiotherapists. The courts were immaculate. It was quite an experience."

Evelyn, who is now a resident of Troutbeck Care Home in Ilkley, was brought up in Bradford and joined Heaton Tennis Club as a young girl after learning the game from her father.

It was there that she met her husband, Curly - a textile merchant - after impressing him with her skills on the court.
She became the reigning Yorkshire Champion in the early 1950s when she applied to play at Wimbledon and to date holds an undefeated record after winning the Yorkshire Women's Tennis Doubles nine times alongside her then partner Barbara Behr.

She said: "Barbara was an excellent player and together we had a very special partnership. To my knowledge our record has never been broken.
"Back in those days tennis was very different to how it is now, we played lady-like' tennis.

"Since it went professional there have been big changes and the girls all compete in a very different way. They are much faster these days and really hit that ball! I love watching it and am hoping that Roger Federer wins the men's title this year."

Photographs of that time, cherished by Evelyn, show her standing next to Little Mo at the famous courts dressed in knee-length white pleated skirts, a white Fred Perry' style T-shirt and a little cardigan.

She said: "I think we looked very smart but I still like the fashion at Wimbledon - it's wonderful. I think all the girls look very pretty and I do like to see what they are wearing.
"I haven't seen Serena William's raincoat yet but I'm sure she looked very nice. I used to go down to Wimbledon and watch the matches every year until three years ago - it was great fun."
Although Evelyn follows all of the matches her favourites tend to be the men's.

She said: "There have been some great players at Wimbledon over the years. I used to like McEnroe - he was a real character.

"I think my all time favourite women's player was Billy Jean King.

"This year I do think Fererer will win - he is such an elegant player - I don't think Andy Murray will do it this year!"

Today, the famous tournament, which started on Monday, boasts the most talented players in the world and has annual attendances of over 450,000 people. The first event was staged there in 1877 by the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club. It had 22 male participants.

Seven years later, the Ladies' Singles and Men's Doubles were introduced but the courts didn't open to professional players until 1968.

Mrs Moeller retired from Wimbledon in 1960 and went on to become a magistrate on the Bradford bench for 25 years, though she continued to play tennis recreationally.
She has a son, Brian and daughter, Ann, (who both played) as well as five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.



Sources:

http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/score...cbc/index.html

http://www.ilkleygazette.co.uk/news/...levised_match/ (link includes a photo of a young Evelyn with Maureen Connolly)
Birth from 1939 England and Wales Register within ancestry.co.uk
Death date from probate records.
Googling lead to announcement in Yorkshire Post

[Thanks to Rollo and Rosamund for this information]
 

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DOBENECK, Baroness "LISA" von (Elisabeth vob Dobeneck)
Germany
Born 1912
Died 1975
Married (1) Gottfried von Cramm (7.7.1909-8.11.76), 1 September 1930, divorced 1937
Married (2) Gustav Jaenecke (22.5.1908-30.5.85), 1937, divorced
Married (3) Wolfgang Amman
[Active in the 1930s]

A good athlete in her own right, Lisa was a minor tennis player better known for her social activities amongst high society as Baroness Von Cramm. John Marshall Fischer's book A Terrible Splendor (2010) provides a good account of the milieu she moved about in.

in the pics she is with von Cramm.



Sources:

A Terrible Splendor: Three Extraordinary Men, a World Poised for War, and the Greatest Tennis Match Ever Played by Marshall John Fischer, 2010.

http://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I480459

[Thanks to Jimbo for this information]
 

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VALDERRAMA, JOY (Joy June Valderramma)
United States
Born 24 August 1931 in Hawaii
Married George Francis Abbot (1887-1995) on 21 November 1983 in Miami, Florida
[Active 1949-1964]


Undefeated in tennis singles and doubles at Temple, Joy Valderrama served as captain of the team. She won the Eastern Intercollegiate Singles Championship in 1951 and played singles and doubles on the Junior Wightman Cup team from 1948-52. She was a member of the Sears Middle States tennis team. She was a doubles champion in the Pennsylvania Grass Courts Tournament in 1949 and a doubles champion in the Middle States Grass Courts in 1950. She was a singles champion in Eastern Clay Courts in 1952. In 1948, she held the title of Hawaiian Junior Champion in singles and doubles. She played hockey for two years and was on the swim team for three years at Temple. She served as referee and tournament director of several amateur tournaments in Philadelphia and for the 1964 Federation Cup. She also coached the Junior Wightman Cup team in 1964-65.

Later wed to George Abbott, famous on Broadway as a playwright, director, and producer.

[Part of an interview with PBS in Hawaii-focusing on her tennis: for ful interview see: http://www.pbshawaii.org/ourproducti...Joy_Abbott.pdf

When your dad was a barber, and you know, he had at least an acquaintance or business relationship with generals at Schofield Barracks. And he was
concerned about you getting ahead, wasnt he?


Absolutely. Yes; my parents were all for achieving, accomplishments, and they thought that versatility would open doors. So, my father taught me tennis.

How did he know tennis?

Well, he played in the Philippines, and he coached tennis, as well as boxing and baseball. So, it was a sports family. And my mother always loved singing, dancing, and the arts. And neither could carry a tune. My father would sing Happy Birthday in five different keys to us. # And my mother loved to dance but she just didnt have it, so she gave us all the lessons.

So, you were in Wahiawa; where did you go to lessons?

Oh, in Schofield Barracks. Because we had this wonderful Black fellow who was a tap dance teacher, and I learned all these wonderful stepsand riffs, and
everything when I was just six years old. There was uh, a revue called the Jackie Suiters Revue. This is way, way, way before your time. And it was at King Theater, and they would have me, because they dubbed me as the Shirley Temple of Hawaii. [CHUCKLE]

Oh, is that right?

Yeah. [CHUCKLE] S
o, I sang these songs as part of this revue. And that was my early debut into showbiz. And at the same time, your dad was making an athlete of you? Oh, yes; yes. So, wed get up earlyin the morning on weekends, because naturally, school, we'n d go. And he would teach me and drill me, and drill me with basic strokes. And then, Id play with my uncles afterwards to hit with them. But it opened doors, cause I won the Hawaiian Junior Ch
ampionship before I left for the mainland.

Were you competitive?

Oh, absolutely competitive. I think it was instinctive. When I was in a tournament, it was, Kill! No prisoners! [CHUCKLE]






http://citypaper.net/articles/020801...r.abbott.shtml

http://www.pbshawaii.org/ourproducti...Joy_Abbott.pdf

http://owlsports.com/hof.aspx?hof=272&path=&kiosk=
 

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MAGUIRE, RITA (nee Ruth Rita Silleck)
United States
Born 09 December 1912 in Manhattan, New York City, New York.
Died 08 June 1962 in Greenwich, Fairfield County, Connecticut.
Married Joseph Basil Maguire, Vice-President of Copy-Craft, Inc. of NYC, on 09 November, 1935 at St. Ignatius Loyola in New York's Upper East Side.
[Active in 1950]

Generally listed as Mrs J Basil Maguire; she entered the 1950 US National doubles.

Mrs J Basil Maguire was known primarily as the niece of New York Yankees owner Jacob "Jake" Ruppert who died in 1939. She inherited one third of his estate, her share being 2 million. She was daughter of his sister Anne Silleck. The team was sold by the family in 1945.

From Greenwich, Connecticut. She was somewhat active as a tennis player, as was her husband.

A photo dated 1939



http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...r&GRid=7533874
 

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WALKER, ANN (nee Ann Lennox Dolan)
United States
Born 18 April 1904 in Boston, Massachuesetts
Married Joseph R Walker 29 September 1921
[Active in 1950]

A nurse before her marriage into a prominent and connected family-Mr Walker coming from a Massachuesetts political family.

Mrs Joseph R Walker of Brookline competed in the US National Doubles in 1950, when she was well into her forties.

https://books.google.com/books?id=rP...okline&f=false

[Thanks to Rollo for this information]
 

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CRAGIN, ADELE (Adele Calhoun Cragin)
United States
Born September 1886 in Bridgeport, Connecticut
Died 28 November 1940 in Plainfield, New Jersey
[Active as early as 1907 to at least 1929]

Sister of players Arthur, Calhoun and William and Louise.

Adele ran women's tournaments at the West Side Tennis Club, Forest Hills, New York City. She also was chair of ladies events at the Seventh Regiment Armoury Club, which ran the US Indoors.

Source:

Miss Adele C Cragin, New York Times, 29 November 1940, page 26. [her obituary]

[Thanks to Newmark and Rollo for this information]
 

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CRAGIN, LOUISE (Louise W Cragin)
United States
Born 1882
Died 20 November 1955
Married Lansing Y Lippincott 22 September 1909 in New York City, New York
[Active from at least 1907 to 1909]

Sister to Adele, Arthur, Calhoun and William. All the siblings played tennis. Her father was a merchant in Brooklyn, New York City. Most of their tennis centered on the metropolitan New York area.

Louise lost in the 1R of the 1909 US Women's Nationals in Philadelphia. She was married just a few months later to a doctor from Metuchen, New Jersey.

She was living in Plainfield, New Jersey in 1940 when her sister died in Louise's house. Her middle initial was "W" despite her gravestone. The family was very proud of its descent from John C Calhoun.

Sources:

New York Times obituary.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=lippincott&GSfn=louise&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSst=33&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=72786654&df=all&
 
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