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It's high time this lovely lady gets a thread of her own. In her own era Baker would have easily won any poll of "best player to never win a slam". She was famous for having two forehands, her sheer beauty, and also for having a winning record vs Maureen Connolly.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here's a recent article on Bev. She is recovering from breast cancer.

http://www.presstelegram.com/health/ci_11875897

Matching up against disease

By Doug Krikorian
Posted: 03/09/2009 10:29:01 PM PDT


(Stephen Carr / Staff Photographer)




Beverly Fleitz shows a 1950s portrait of her greeting Queen Elizabeth at a garden party before she played at Wimbledon. She made it to the tournament's finals in 1955, losing to Louise Brough. Fleitz is now retired and living in Naples and faces a new opponent after undergoing a mastectomy Feb. 11.​
Beverly Fleitz hands over a thick lavender-colored album with gold trim entitled "Our Tennis Journey," and it turns out to be a family anthology that is dominated by photos and newspaper clippings of her when she was a bright comet streaking across the athletic firmament.
"You might find some things in here of interest," she says softly.
She is a fascinating lady who maintains a bright mien in a dark time, and she affects a strong spirit that I'm sure she displayed on tennis courts around the world back in the 1950s when she held victories over the likes of such legendary performers as Althea Gibson and Maureen (Little Mo) Connolly.
She was one of the top female players in the sport in those days and even made it to the Wimbledon finals, where she lost to Louise Brough, 7-5, 8-6, in 1955 - the same year she also won a French Open doubles title with Darlene Hard.
"I also should have won that Wimbledon title," she says with wistfulness. "I had beaten Louise Brough the previous two times we had faced each other - and beat her the next two times I faced her. "But that day she got the better
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of me."
She is seated in the front room of her Treasure Island home in Naples that has a dazzling view of Alamitos Bay, and she is casually dressed in a pink and black Adidas sweat suit.
She smiles softly, and this sweet, perky 78-year-old lady admits recovery has been difficult from having undergone a double mastectomy Feb. 11.
"The doctors would like me to try chemo or radiation, but I'm not going to do that," she says. "I've heard chemo makes you nauseous, and I experienced enough of that during my pregnancies (she has four grown daughters). I don't want to go through it again. I'm just going to enjoy whatever time I have left with my husband and family. I have no complaints. I've had a great life."
For sure, Beverly Fleitz has had one great, compelling, astonishing, memorable life, ranging from the 58-year marriage she's had with a wealthy Long Beach businessman and Poly High graduate, John Fleitz, who also was quite a tennis player himself, to the close relationship she has maintained with her children and 10 grandchildren, to the remarkable tennis career she had that resulted in her meeting so many famous people and visiting so many famous cities and attending so many famous events.
How many people ever can say they attended a garden party hosted by Lady Crossfield prior to Wimbledon - and warmly shaking the hand of Queen Elizabeth at the event?
How many people ever can say they hold victories over Althea Gibson and Maureen Connolly - two of the greatest female players in the history of tennis?
How many people ever can say they played the sport with two forehands - able to shift the racket from one hand to the other as a result of being ambidextrous?
How many people ever can say they have been on a first-name basis with icons of the sport like Jack Kramer, Pancho Gonzalez, Ken Roswell, Lew Hoad, Vic Seixas, as well as countless others?
How many people ever can say they participated in four Wrightman Cups and never lost a match?
How many people ever can say they have played tennis in front of the likes of Errol Flynn and Clark Gable and Gene Tierney and Sydney Chaplin and Dinah Shore and George Montgomery and Gilbert Roland and so many other Hollywood personages?
Well, Beverly Fleitz, who was born Beverly Brown in Providence, R.I., and grew up in Santa Monica, can. This 2005 inductee into the Southern California Tennis Association Hall of Fame began playing tennis at age 11 at Lincoln Park in Santa Monica under the tutelage of her father, Frank Baker, who was the assistant recreation director of the city at the time.
"I just took to tennis immediately," she says. "It's something that came pretty natural to me. And, of course, I liked it."
By the time she was 17, she was etching quite a reputation around Southern California, as she won the Pacific Southwest Championship in 1947 and other local tournaments.
She cut quite a dazzling figure on the courts, and several newspaper articles in her scrapbooks emphasize her attractiveness - she is described as "lissome, "stunningly attractive," "beautiful" - along with her dominating play.
At 19, she was smitten by the actor Scotty Beckett - he appeared in the "Our Gang" shorts and also portrayed the young Al Jolson in the "Al Jolson Story" - and they eloped to Las Vegas.
"When I called my parents and told them what I was planning to do, they begged me not to," she relates. "Well, I was young and dumb and didn't listen. My parents were right. I made a terrible mistake. Four months later, I got a divorce."
Her next try at marriage would be slightly more successful, as she and John Fleitz have been inseparable since exchanging vows in 1951.
"We first met at the La Jolla Beach & Tennis Club when I was 17 and he was 18," she says. "The first time he saw me, he said he fell in love with me. Four years later, we were married."
Beverly Fleitz throughout the 1950s was the only female tennis player on the tour who was married and who had children - and she actually had to drop out of the 1956 Wimbledon quarterfinals when she became ill from the effects of being pregnant.
"The queen's gynecologist and three of his assistants visited my hotel room to check on me, and he said it wouldn't be proper to have an incident at center court," relates Fleitz. "I agreed, dropped out of the tournament and flew back to the United States."
Shortly after she won the Pacific Southwest Championship for the fourth time, in 1959, she decided the physical, mental and traveling toll that tennis was taking on her was too much for a 29-year-old mother with two children.
"My body was starting to break down, and I just wanted to spend more time with my kids," says Fleitz, who moved to Naples with her husband in 1985 from Rolling Hills Estates where her daughters, Kimberley Durate, 56; Julie Kazarian, 52; Lisa Fleitz, 48; and Jamie Fleitz, 45; attended Palos Verdes High.
At the time she stopped playing in world-class tournaments, she was the No. 1 ranked female tennis player in America.
She would continue to perform in exhibition matches, and didn't give up the sport for good until 1985.
In the meantime, she took up golfing, and it's not exactly a surprise she would become quite proficient at it.
She has played often across the years at the Virginia Country Club, where her husband has been a long-time member.
The couple also belong to Ironwood in Palm Desert, where they have a home on the golf course.
She is hoping to soon revive an old family tradition with her children and grandchildren.
"For years we'd always get together and go to Kauai and just have a great time," she says. "I'm hoping we can do it again, God be willing. I'm looking forward to it, really looking forward to it..."
 

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In 1958 Mrs Fleitz did not play outside the US (if we count a couple of Caribbean events as being on the US circuit which was the norm in the 50s) and took part in only two big events - the US Championships (reaching the semis losing to Gibson and the Pacific SouthWest at which she beat Darlene Hard, plus the Caribe-Hilton (which she won beating Althea Gibson) and several lesser ones yet was ranked top 3 in the world (#2 by Potter, #3 by Tingay.)

I actually don't have a problem with this as I felt she just about about played enough and had the wins over leading players to qualify for a ranking - her lack of play showed up when Rollo only ranked her #7.

However, it seemed an entirely different kettle of fish in 1961 when Maria Bueno had much the same sort of record and number of events played. She had dominated the early part of the season winning tournaments in the Caribbean and the Italian regarded as the "5th Slam" in those days. Only one loss was suffered to Yola Ramirez.

Then in the French championships Maria lost in the quarters to Suzy Kormoczy but it was immediately confirmed she was suffering from hepatitis and she was out until around March of the following year.

Yet these same correspondents refused to rank her on the grouns of "insufficient data.)

Oh to be American or British in those good old days:rolleyes: - it seemed you got preferential treatment.
 

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In her younger years, she looked like Anne Wiggins Brown.
 

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It's high time this lovely lady gets a thread of her own. In her own era Baker would have easily won any poll of "best player to never win a slam". She was famous for having two forehands, her sheer beauty, and also for having a winning record vs Maureen Connolly.
Great idea Rollo to have a thread for this famous player of bygone years. Is she still alive? Never hear of her if she is. And what was the name of the baby she had that caused her to default from Wimbledon in 56? NOt that I am complaining- at least it got a British player to the final- Angela Buxton.:)
 

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That was a great article and so interesting to read- thanks Rollo. It answered a few of the questions I had posed to you. It is a shame that she didnt win in 55 at Wimbledon. I am sure that Louise Brough was not the player she had been by that point?
 

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In 1958 Mrs Fleitz did not play outside the US (if we count a couple of Caribbean events as being on the US circuit which was the norm in the 50s) and took part in only two big events - the US Championships (reaching the semis losing to Gibson and the Pacific SouthWest at which she beat Darlene Hard, plus the Caribe-Hilton (which she won beating Althea Gibson) and several lesser ones yet was ranked top 3 in the world (#2 by Potter, #3 by Tingay.)

I actually don't have a problem with this as I felt she just about about played enough and had the wins over leading players to qualify for a ranking - her lack of play showed up when Rollo only ranked her #7.

However, it seemed an entirely different kettle of fish in 1961 when Maria Bueno had much the same sort of record and number of events played. She had dominated the early part of the season winning tournaments in the Caribbean and the Italian regarded as the "5th Slam" in those days. Only one loss was suffered to Yola Ramirez.

Then in the French championships Maria lost in the quarters to Suzy Kormoczy but it was immediately confirmed she was suffering from hepatitis and she was out until around March of the following year.

Yet these same correspondents refused to rank her on the grouns of "insufficient data.)

Oh to be American or British in those good old days:rolleyes: - it seemed you got preferential treatment.
I did not realise that she was still as highly ranked as that at the end of the decade Chris.:confused:
 

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I did not realise that she was still as highly ranked as that at the end of the decade Chris.:confused:
It more or less appears now that Lance Tingay's ranking lists pre-Open era are now unofficially accepted as official - they seem to be almost exclusively quoted. In 1959 when she only played Wimbledon of the majors and lost to Edda Buding in 4r he ranked her #4 (Ned Potter went even further and placed her at #3) based on winning the Pacific SouthWest and beating Mortimer and Truman in the Wightman Cup.

Howevr, the Blaster Panel only had her at #7.

That was the last year she played on the circuit.
 

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It's high time this lovely lady gets a thread of her own. In her own era Baker would have easily won any poll of "best player to never win a slam". She was famous for having two forehands, her sheer beauty, and also for having a winning record vs Maureen Connolly.
What was her h2h with Maureen?
 

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It more or less appears now that Lance Tingay's ranking lists pre-Open era are now unofficially accepted as official - they seem to be almost exclusively quoted. In 1959 when she only played Wimbledon of the majors and lost to Edda Buding in 4r he ranked her #4 (Ned Potter went even further and placed her at #3) based on winning the Pacific SouthWest and beating Mortimer and Truman in the Wightman Cup.

Howevr, the Blaster Panel only had her at #7.

That was the last year she played on the circuit.
Pretty impressive Wightman Cup wins over Mortimer and Truman Chris.:worship:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Posted by Chris Whiteside What was her h2h with Maureen?
That's an excellent question. I'll have to set to work on that.

Posted by Iainmac
That was a great article and so interesting to read- thanks Rollo. It answered a few of the questions I had posed to you. It is a shame that she didnt win in 55 at Wimbledon. I am sure that Louise Brough was not the player she had been by that point?
That's correct. Louise had all sorts of troubles with her service toss as she got older. She had a habit of catching it a lot in later years. When I spoke with Louise by phone a few years back she had a lot to say about this match. Hopefully I kept notes! A couple of items I do recall from the conversation:

1. Brough had worked on her fitness in the winter months, running laps around the track in California.

2. A lunge volley won the match for her. It didn't happen at match point, but came at a crucial time as Louise was getting tired. Fleitz hit a sizzling passer that Louise managed to barely stab at for a winner. Louise told me "I was seeing this French fella"... The "French fella" was sitting in the player's box near the Fleitz camp and told her after the match that Bev's husband felt it was the turning point.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Beverly Fleitz throughout the 1950s was the only female tennis player on the tour who was married and who had children -
That statement is not entirely accurate. Fleitz was clearly the most famous mom on tour-but not the only one. Pat Todd also played after having kids, as did some less prominent women.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Bev was first married to actor Scotty Beckett in Spetember of 1949. Anyone ever seen "Little Rascals"? He was a famous child actor who killed his own career by getting in drunken brawls.

This is from IMDB

At around the same time, Scotty began to gain notoriety not only for his acting, but also for his nocturnal activities. Part of the young Hollywood jet set, Beckett was a fixture at parties and would frequently be seen with young stars like Roddy McDowall, Jane Powell, Elizabeth Taylor, and Edith Fellows. His nightlife seemed to become more of a priority than his burgeoning acting career, and it started a trend of reckless, irresponsible behavior which plagued Beckett the rest of his life. Early success without any sacrifice often breeds a sense of entitlement and a lack of responsibility or consequence. This seems to be an overriding theme as Beckett began making headlines most Hollywood stars try to avoid.

In 1948 he was arrested for drunk driving after he crashed into another car after attending a frat party where he had "five bourbons". Scotty tried to run from the booking office after being arrested and refused to surrender his possessions. In September of 1949, he eloped with tennis star Beverly Baker. Right from the start, Scotty showed signs that he was not ready for marriage. On their honeymoon in Acapulco, Beckett allegedly threatened to punch a pool bystander in the nose. The couple separated after 5 months of marriage, divorcing in June of 1950. Newspapers covered the divorce, citing Baker's allegations of Beckett's jealousy and controlling, abusive behavior. Scotty tried to get Baker to quit tennis and stop seeing her parents. He also threatened her if she were to ever have a soft drink "with any boy or man between 6 and 60."
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Speaking of not entirely accurate-I may have been wrong on the head to head. (There could be early California results that change things)

Currently what I have gives Mo a 3-2 edge

July 1950 FI East Hampton Baker d Connolly 6-4 9-7
July 1951 SF Penn State Connolly d Baker 6-4 6-3
Aug 1951 QF Manchester Connolly d Baker 9-7 6-2
Sept1951 FI PSW Connolly d Baker 9-7 6-4
MAR 1954 SF La Jolla Fleitz d Connolly 6-0 6-4

*The 6-0 6-4 was probably Mo's worst defeat after 1950.
 

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That's an excellent question. I'll have to set to work on that.



That's correct. Louise had all sorts of troubles with her service toss as she got older. She had a habit of catching it a lot in later years. When I spoke with Louise by phone a few years back she had a lot to say about this match. Hopefully I kept notes! A couple of items I do recall from the conversation:

1. Brough had worked on her fitness in the winter months, running laps around the track in California.

2. A lunge volley won the match for her. It didn't happen at match point, but came at a crucial time as Louise was getting tired. Fleitz hit a sizzling passer that Louise managed to barely stab at for a winner. Louise told me "I was seeing this French fella"... The "French fella" was sitting in the player's box near the Fleitz camp and told her after the match that Bev's husband felt it was the turning point.
It just shows you what a champion and an athlete Brough was. To be at that stage of her career and still have the hunger to go training and maintain the drive is remarkable. From how I interpret it many people felt at the emergence of Connolly that she was finished at grand slam winning level. But you can never write a great player off- they tend to come back!!
 
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