Tennis Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,170 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am still up at 3:00 in the morning because of my freakin anxiety.

Does anyone else here have an anxiety problem?

I finally went to the Dr. on Friday but I have to wait for a few weeks to see the psychiatrist. The psychiatrist is the only one who can prescribe me medicine. Then the medicine will take about 2-4 weeks to kick in. I hate having to wait that long because I am so tired of the way I feel. The reason I have to wait is because I am going to the University Dr and there is only one psychiatrists on campus for all the students. :roll:

It just seems to have gotten really bad lately. Like today was great for me, I had no trouble and even had a lot of company over and we had a good time. Then I get ready to jump in bed and I guess I was lying there thinking and maybe I thought too much. Next thing I know I have to either get out of bed and distract myself (like I am doing now) or lay there and risk having a panic attack.

I just haven't enjoyed doing things that everyone enjoys. Going out to eat, going to the movies, going out with friends; all of those things are nearly impossible for me because my anxiety gets to me. Sometimes I want to do those things so badly that I deal with the anxiety for a while and it passes once I get to where I am going and am settled in. Most of the time though, I can't deal with the anxiety so I sit at home and do nothing.

The only fun thing I have done this year was going to US Figure Skating Nationals in Dallas. That was a HUGE anxiety producer but luckily my problem wasn't so bad and I wanted to go more than anything, so I dealt with it. It was always a dream to go to Nationals so I wouldn't let anything in my way. Since then I have gone out to eat a few times, maybe one or two movies and that has been it. Even going home to visit my parents causes great anxiety.

I am sorry this is so long but typing all of this is making me feel so much better. If you have read this far then you are amazing, hehe.

Does anyone out there relate to what I am going through? How do you deal with it, are you on any medications? If so, how much have they helped. Can you please offer me any hope?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,635 Posts
"Then I get ready to jump in bed and I guess I was lying there thinking and maybe I thought too much. Next thing I know I have to either get out of bed and distract myself (like I am doing now) or lay there and risk having a panic attack."

oh yeah I can relate to this so well. I often do the light on. it sounds weird but I feel better then. it's harder to get scary thoughts when you can see anything. sometimes I start to read, watch tv or take a shower (but that was only in my worst period when I just moved on my own and everything was new and scary) or put the computer on again.

I am not on medicine. my therapist tries that everytime but I am afraid for another epileptic attack :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,170 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Irma, I am sorry you had an epileptic attack. Is that like haveing seizures? I couldn't blame you for not wanting that. Perhaps you could try a totally different medication though and that wouldn't happen?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,635 Posts
I don't know exactly what happened. suddenly I woke up and was dizzy and two hours later I was in the hospital and there they told me what happened and later that I am sensitive for those attacks

my therapist says too that I can try other medicine but I am still scared also that it will not works anyway since thoughts come with your mind and how can you ever stop that? :eek:
 

·
Team WTAworld, Senior Member
Joined
·
10,772 Posts
I get panic attacks, but only in public, in big rooms with lots of people (assembly is the worst). I'm dreading going to university, lectures with 100s of people there.

A lot of it is to do with the way I breathe. Once you get your breathing in control, they're easier to control. If you feel one coming on, hold you breath, don't take a breath before you hold it. That might work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,210 Posts
I have panic attacks and severe anxiety and on rare days i can beat the world. If it comes down to it i can handle anything, but afterwards i need my time all on my own........i hate rooms of people and the thought of them, in an ideal world i'd be with a few people and the only other people that existed would be through my PC and on TV
 

·
Team WTAworld, The Martian Llama
Joined
·
20,264 Posts
I have it too, I'm a very nervous person especially amongst people I don't know. When I'm out, I'm usually alright, it's just I really worry about things beforehand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152,750 Posts
I understand a bit how you feel too. I don't like going out for dinner, or to places that I don't know very well, because I get really nervous about it, and I usually feel quite ill if I'm pressured into going somewhere I don't want to go. It's strange with me though, because it's only for some things, like if I haven't been there before, I get worried about it. Once I've been there a few times, then it's alright, and I'm usually OK with it. I go to the basketball alot, and when I first started going, it was quite bad, but now I'm used to it, and I've been to most of the stadiums that "my" team plays at, and so I'm comfortable there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,210 Posts
I also should say, I often can spend 4 or 5 days indoors without going anywhere and speaking to anyone but my flatmate (or with my flatmate, she tells me what to do and always is bossy and rude)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152,750 Posts
yeah... that really sucks too! I love going out with my friends, but alot of the time I just feel like staying at home. It's hard to explain. It's like I want to go out, but something inside me also just wants to stay in and watch a video or something.

Plus with me, the anxiety doesn't come as shortness of breath. It comes as a cough that makes me feel like I'm gonna chuck (which is really lovely) :fiery:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,210 Posts
I keep losing jobs because of it as well. I've been told i'm intelligent, hard working, more than most, yet it's pointless me working the way i am.

I think you can tell with my posts sometimes, rather than put in a detailed post, i'd rather be silly or give a brief reply............

And the reason, despite being a really friendly, intelligent and hard working person................i have an ATTITUDE problem.

It's amazing how depression and anxiety is still not recognised by alot of people. I admit i do have an ATTITUDE problem, but it's the reasons i have that problem that's the issue.............I'll have an even bigger attitude problem next week when i lose the net and my sports channels on TV
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,635 Posts
the reason that depression is not recognized is that people don't understand what it is. they think feeling down a little bit or something goes wrong (like missing the train or something small) makes you depressed. that's called being down, being depressed is something totally different. :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,218 Posts
The 2-4 week "induction period" suggests that you're referring to an SSRI (promotes serotonin utilization) like Prozac, Zoloft, or Paxil (American brand names); perhaps (also US names) the somewhat useful Buspar or the nearly worthless Wellbutrin which poor Lucic got "busted" by the French Fed. for using (with a valid prescription) last year. Many doctors hesitate to prescribe the old fashioned benzodiazepenes like Klonipin (clonazepam) and Ativan (lorazepam) because, yes, they're addictive (uh, so are air, water, food, etc.) AND haven't been "pushed" by the pharmaceutical industry in years (as they aren't covered by patents anymore, and thus the generic "copies" are sold @ lower prices). The literature supports their safety and effectiveness if used @ the lowest effective dose. However: they are dangerous to mix with alcohol! And one "cousin" (Valium) causes residual drowsiness; another (Xanax) is rather short acting. BTW, in the US, any MD or DO can legally prescribe ANY of the above drugs, though many don't (despite health plans becoming more restrictive in paying psychiatric benefits). We spend the money to be the world's lone superpower, blah, that Europe spends on universal healthcare. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,940 Posts
I do... it's a side effect of a medicine I take for my bigger problem, but my anxiety has become a bigger problem because my disorder is pretty much non-existant with the medicine. It's the damn anxiety that's my problem now--and I have been on so many different medications, but the problem persists. It's not terribly unbearable though
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,491 Posts
rd878 said:
The 2-4 week "induction period" suggests that you're referring to an SSRI (promotes serotonin utilization) like Prozac, Zoloft, or Paxil (American brand names); perhaps (also US names) the somewhat useful Buspar or the nearly worthless Wellbutrin which poor Lucic got "busted" by the French Fed. for using (with a valid prescription) last year. Many doctors hesitate to prescribe the old fashioned benzodiazepenes like Klonipin (clonazepam) and Ativan (lorazepam) because, yes, they're addictive (uh, so are air, water, food, etc.) AND haven't been "pushed" by the pharmaceutical industry in years (as they aren't covered by patents anymore, and thus the generic "copies" are sold @ lower prices). The literature supports their safety and effectiveness if used @ the lowest effective dose. However: they are dangerous to mix with alcohol! And one "cousin" (Valium) causes residual drowsiness; another (Xanax) is rather short acting. BTW, in the US, any MD or DO can legally prescribe ANY of the above drugs, though many don't (despite health plans becoming more restrictive in paying psychiatric benefits). We spend the money to be the world's lone superpower, blah, that Europe spends on universal healthcare. :rolleyes:
it seems to me a persons regular physician is prescribing more and more meds rather than that person going to a pyschiatrist. yes a regular physician is capable of this but should they really? most people spend very little time talking to their doctor [usually no more than, what, ten minutes a visit?]. simply saying "i have anxiety" should not be a sign for a doctor to give them meds. do we really want our society to walk around like a bunch of drugged-up zombies? [as if its not bad enough already]. people with anxiety/depression usually have more deep-rooted issues and while the "magic pills" hide the mental anguish, that doesnt make everything better. covering up the problem temporarily with drugs is not the solution. basically, the message we are sending out to our children is "yes, its okay to escape your problems via drugs, as long as those drugs are prescribed and legal".

and i understand that there are some cases where a person has tried everything and drugs are the only thing that can help. but there are far too many people out there on paxil, etc that dont need to be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152,750 Posts
decemberlove said:
it seems to me a persons regular physician is prescribing more and more meds rather than that person going to a pyschiatrist. yes a regular physician is capable of this but should they really? most people spend very little time talking to their doctor [usually no more than, what, ten minutes a visit?]. simply saying "i have anxiety" should not be a sign for a doctor to give them meds. do we really want our society to walk around like a bunch of drugged-up zombies? [as if its not bad enough already]. people with anxiety/depression usually have more deep-rooted issues and while the "magic pills" hide the mental anguish, that doesnt make everything better. covering up the problem temporarily with drugs is not the solution. basically, the message we are sending out to our children is "yes, its okay to escape your problems via drugs, as long as those drugs are prescribed and legal".

and i understand that there are some cases where a person has tried everything and drugs are the only thing that can help. but there are far too many people out there on paxil, etc that dont need to be.
That's interesting actually. I don't think going on drugs is good either. But I haven't spoken to anyone about my problems. I certainly wouldn't want to go to a psychiatrist or something, because I don't think my problem is so bad, and I can usually manage it (by choosing when I eat, and where I go) etc. I think if there's a way to manage a problem without drugs, then it's got to be better than just sticking people on drugs willy-nilly. I've studied psychology at University, and seeing some of the effects of drugs on people is not nice. I won't even take a sleeping tablet because you get addicted to them so easily. Now I understand some people just can't sleep and they need the tablets, which is fine, but if there's a way without drugs, it has to be better!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,247 Posts
The girl that I like used to have panic attacks constantly that were caused by some problems that she went through. She didn't want to take any medication so she just went to the doctor a few times and he gave her some pointers on what to do to beat them. Last I heard, she was doing much better.

From the sounds of it in this thread, her case was pretty mild. Hopefully everything turns out ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,218 Posts
Indeed everyone is different. Sarah, I should point out that some of the side effects that are most noticeable such as tardive dyskinesia (a type of involuntary muscle spasms) are more associated with drugs seldom used anymore. And as I said, many are addictive, but I believe everyone in the WTA (except perhaps Dani) is "addicted" to eating. In and of itself, I find that akin to one foregoing medication for a non "mental disorder" because of a stigma. Sorry, but the brain operates on (chemical) neurotransmitters, not only electrical impulses. (Ask Jen after her next bong)! :eek: So one is only altering a "chemical environment", not creating one. And (some) psychotherapists financially "milk" a patient or their insurer (public or private) as long as possible, because they're running a business, not being Mother Theresa. BTW, Dec. Love, you're right that drugs are not a "cure-all". HOWEVER, heart patients are told to diet and exercise ALONG WITH their medication, which may then be reduced.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top