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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ann Kiyomura Hayashi. The highlight of her career was winning the Wimbledon doubles in 1975, but she was probably a better overall player in the late 70s and early 80s-noted for her partnership in doubles with Sue Barker. The Sawamatsu-Kiyomura didn't last as Kazuko retired and got married in 1975. I wonder if Ann ever learned how to speak Japanese. She became an instant hit in Japan in 1985 (and won the Tokyo event one year-1981 maybe?) yet couldn't speak Japanese in 1975.



 

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Re: Ann Kiyomura Hiyashi

From
http://www.asianweek.com/2002_11_08/sports_pioneers.html

Breaking Into the Country Club
Ann Kiyomura was twice a champion at Wimbledon, in 1973 in the Singles Junior division, and in 1975 as a doubles partner of Japan’s Kazuko Sawamatsu. The apple didn’t fall far from the tree: her mother Hisayo was the No. 2 tennis player in Japan during a two-year residence abroad, and her father Harry still teaches the game at age 84.

Kiyomura rose through the ranks as a youngster, winning 17 national junior tennis titles. Her biggest victory came in the 1973 Junior Wimbledon singles match against someone you may have heard of: Martina Navratilova. Kiyomura went on to play as a professional for 13 years and was often ranked in the top 20 in the singles division. She won both the single and doubles trophies at the 1978 Japan Open.

Local tennis legend and onetime Kiyomura teammate Louie “Peanut” Harper spoke of the influence of her friend’s win at Wimbledon on a sport that had belonged to the white country club set. “Imagine that, two Asian women were the best in the world,” said Harper. “Ann was a role model, and she carried herself with
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Re: Ann Kiyomura Hiyashi

Herson became a tennisplayer.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/04/24/SPGO46AE0I1.DTL

Aragon tennis star keeps it all in the family

Hayashi draws from Mom's court success


Mitch Stephens, Chronicle Staff Writer
Saturday, April 24, 2004


You could barely hear a shoe squeak during Aragon High senior John Hayashi's 6-0, 6-0 win over an overmatched Carlmont foe on Thursday.

No grunts. No affirmation of the score. And certainly no cheering from the section that, as always, included his mom, two-time Wimbledon champion and 11-year professional, Ann Kiyomura-Hayashi.

"I just watch," said Kiyomura-Hayashi, a San Mateo native. "I don't clap. I'm not a yeller or a cheerer. I like to watch."

Interesting, because Hayashi, who finished the Peninsula Athletic League season at 14-0, doesn't boast about his mom's accomplishments either. Things such as:
-- She beat Martina Navratilova for the 1973 Wimbledon junior-singles title, the first Wimbledon crown captured by an Asian American. "I don't remember any of the points from that match, but I remember Martina was very mad and afterward she even cried," Kiyomura-Hayashi said.
-- She teamed with Japan's Kazuko Sawamatsu for the 1975 Wimbledon doubles title. "That kind of started the tennis boom in Japan," Kiyomura- Hayashi said.
-- She played for the World Team Tennis league's San Francisco Golden Gaters, Los Angeles Strings and Hawaii Leis.
-- She was a charter member of the Japanese American Sports Hall of Fame.
It's not that Hayashi isn't proud of his mom. It's just that she's low- key about her feats.
"I think even some of his teammates don't know," Aragon coach Dave Owdom said. "Just his best friends."
"She doesn't watch old film of herself, or display trophies or newspaper articles," Hayashi said. "I think she's proud of her accomplishments, but after playing she just moved on to being a good mother."

Part of that was teaching her son the game, just like her parents taught her. Her mother, Hisayo, was the No. 2 tennis player in Japan during a two- year residence abroad, and her father, Harry, was a tennis instructor. Both attend their grandson's matches, as well.

"My mom and my dad (David Hayashi, a dentist in San Mateo) never pushed me into the sport or forced me to take it up," Hayashi said.
Said Kiyomura-Hayashi: "Of course we want to expose him and our daughter (Jane, 12) to tennis, but also to all other things that help young people grow. "
Hayashi played all team sports growing up. A 6-0, 6-0 loss in 2002 to then-Mills senior Alex Strom, now on scholarship at Texas A&M, lit a fire under Hayashi -- along with a speech from then-Aragon coach Ron Campana.

"He said if you want to play at (Strom's) caliber, you need to devote yourself fully to the game," Hayashi said.
With that, he gave up basketball and baseball, started lifting weights and trained year-round, focusing on a serve-and-volley attack rather than bashing from the baseline.
He's still not at Strom's caliber, but at 20-1 overall, he's one of the Central Coast Section's most successful singles players.
More so, Owdom said, he's now an impassioned team captain and leader of a team that went 16-4 overall, 12-2 in PAL action, losing twice, 4-3, to longtime CCS power Menlo.
"He's the heart and soul of the team," Owdom said. "You might find kids with more skills, but when it comes to will-power and toughness, there's no one better."
That's also reflected in the classroom, where Hayashi boasts a 4.21 grade- point average. He's one of Aragon's four valedictorians and has been accepted to the Naval Academy, thanks, in part, to a recommendation from Sen. Dianne Feinstein.

Hayashi plans to walk on to the tennis team there and to train as a fighter pilot. "He's a very good boy," said Kiyomura-Hayashi . "He's learned to go after the life he wants. He knows what he wants to do."
 

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You're right. She played her best later in her career. She had some great results in Tokyo, but never achieved much in singles at the grand slam level. She was so tiny.

I remember funny story involving Bettina Bunge. Bunge had been off the circuit for a while -- maybe to have her ear surgery -- and when she came back, the pulled a joke on her in the lockerroom. They kept complaining about a wildcard given to some player called Hayashi. If I remember reading correctly, Bunge got a bit steamed about it as well, only to discover it was none other than Kiyomura's married name.
 

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I really liked to watch her game. Very fluid player. And she formed world class pairings with Sue Barker and Jo Durie, so that made me smile.
 
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