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Hi there, here's an interesting interview that Chanda gave on the last issue of the French's edition of Tennis Magazine. I translated this, so please excuse the mistakes :eek:

Tennis Magazine: You're 27 years old, and you just reached the 7th rank on the WTA's ranking, near of your highest rank (6th) in 1996. How would you this stage of your career?
Chanda Rubin: I'm 27, but i don't have the feeling to have played to my best level yet. I believe that some interesting things could happen to me soon. (smile) When i reached the 6th rank, my progression has been immediatly stopped because of a serious hand's injury, and i didn't have time enough to realize what accomplished at the age of 20. So now, i hope that i'll keep going and appreciate my come back at the high level. Still, i think that my game improved a lot since 1996. I'm sure too that all trials i went through helped me to make me stronger mentally speaking.

TM: Which sectors of your game did you improve?
CR: I'm not the most powerful or the most tallest of the players, but i believe i've managed to optimize my strenghts, including my speed. I'm too more agressive and i take more my chances to go to the net, even if i could be more offensive. Let's say that i found a sort of technical's harmony.

TM: You're a player who seems to be characterized by a lots of modesty. How is that discretion compatible with higher ambitions?
CR: I'm not one of those who is noticed by her scandalous' statements, that's right, but it doesn't prevent me to be ambitious. (smile) I'm someone who is very motivated, and i proved by overcoming injuries which could have been devastating psychologically. If i would have not fix higher goals, i wouldn't be there, in front of you, as the 7th player of the world. I'm discret but determined. It doesn't make the first page of the news, but that's qualities which areenough to improve. (smile)

TM: But to be ambitious, do you say to yourself: "i'll win a Grand Slam" ?
CR: Like the other girls, i want to win a Slam (smile). But i don't precisely focus on this goal. Whatever tournament, whatever the level, i take things as they come. I don't put pression in my shoulders if it's Wimbledon or the US Open. That's not sensationnal to say that, but i take match after match, with the same seriosity, the same determination. And i'm at the end of the second week, i'd consider that i've as many chances as the other girls have. I've been in the semifinal of a Slam only once, and it's been a while. I know the difficulty to escape from presomptuous' statements. But yes, i'd like to win a Slam, but who would say the contrary. (smile)

TM: After trials you faced because of three serious' injuries, are you surprised to be where you are, so near of the Top 5 ?
CR: Surprised, no, because i know the work i did. I consider that i deserved what i got. I know from where i come, more exactly, from where i come back. (smile) I remember for instance that last year, i needed a protect's ranking to enter into the draws of the tournaments. I was 60 or 70th. After some months, i did something i would have dreamt about. I couldn't know it would be so fast. And however, i had some frustration's periods, here and there. Everything haven't been positive, but i clung to my determination, at all costs.

TM: Since 1996, what have the most difficult situation to face?
CR: The first injury at the hand has been difficult to live. During some months, i didn't know how the evolution of my injury would go. That was my first serious' injury, and i was doubtful: would i find again my best level, or worse, would am i able to play tennis? But the worse has been to learn that i should be operated again at my left knee in 2002. That was a difficult thing to accept, because i did so much sacrifices to built everything again after the first operation a year earlier. Again, i worked harder as i could, from nothing, and it hasn't been easy to admit because i did a lots of efforts physically. I was on crutches for 4 weeks, and i thought hard. But i knew that patience would be my best friend.

TM: During these times you were out of the tour, how did you manage to be positive?
CR: When hear the news, you're hurt, that's normal, and then you put into perspectives. You know that there's nothing you can do, so you have bounce. And the doctors have always been positive with me, i've never been said that i wouldn't be able to play tennis again. As i said it, i clung to my motivation, and i believed it. I did my reeducations with precautious, and i went ahead. I never have wanted to stop because a part of me knows that was possible. And that was right. (smile)

TM: You always seems to put into perspective...
CR: I overcame difficult's situations, but what is it when you're comparing that with trials the life can sometimes provide us? I always try to put my career into perspective. If the worse that could happen to me is three operations without to be unable to play tennis, that's not so serious. (smile)

TM: After your first operation at the hand in 1996, you apparently faced some important troubles with your forehand. Tell us about that.
CR: In 1997, i played quite decently in the whole, but i barely could hit a forehand into the limits of the court. Which was annoying as it was my best stroke. I had a serious problem of grip. After the Australian Open, in 1998, where i played poorly,i've decided to play some challengers to win some matches and earn some confidence with that forehand. I remember for example about a tournament in Midland, Michigan, where i didn't put any forehands on the court. Bud Collins was in the crowd, and was scared by what he was seeing. (smile) From what i heard, he called Benny Sims, a former coach that i knew since 11 years old, to inform him about my problems. And that's how Benny came to see me at home, in Lafayette, to talk about that. We've decided to work together again to built this forehand, and we're still together since. That's when i found my forehand that i began to go ahead. Without Benny, i wouldn't be where i am.

TM:So you met him when you were 11 years old...
CR: That was during the USA's championships of the less of 12. There were too Lindsay Davenport, Jennifer Capriati and Mary Pierce. Coincurrence was rude, but he found that i was talented. So we began to work together in contract with USTA.

TM: How is he as a man?
CR: He always has strong opinions. I'd say that he "feels" goos the persons he meets. I believe in what i do, but he believes in me too. We sometimes get tenser, but never quarrels. I argue, he argues, and then we find a compromise.

TM: You're from Louisiane, an American State which is a French's cousin. Tell us about your childhood in Lafayette...
CR: I grew up in a quiet atmosphere, life went slowly.(smile)That was very quiet, very far from the agitation of New Orleans. Lafayette is a town where you take the time to live. We're not so much worried. (smile). People appreciate to take the life as it comes, in good or bad sides. My childhood looks like a sort of routine which reflects well my personnality. And now, whenever i come to Lafayette, that's always to appreciate that tranquility and this slow's atmosphere. (smile)

TM: Did you learn French when you were a child?
CR: Yes i did, but i lost a lot from what i learnt at school. When i'm in France, i try to keep the contact with the language, but it's difficult. The fact that Louisiane is a French's cousin helped to make me feel at home when i'm in Paris. I should think to take again some lessons one of these days.(smile) My grand mother speaks a sort a French's dialect. She knows a little too the Cajun's culture.

TM: Your father has the particularity to be a judge in a Lafayette's tribunal. Is he still doing his profession?
CR: Yes he does. I went once to the tribunal some years ago, but it wasn't as exciting as i was thinking about. I've imagined that like the television's shows where you can see some spectacular's reconstitutions. But it wasn't exciting affairs, and i finally found that more boring than anything. (smile). I hadn't go there since.

TM: Before to be judge, he was lawyer, isn't it?
CR: Exactly. His story is incredible because he's from a poor family with 11 children in a small house. But he went through that by working a lot. At the end of his law's studies, that's my mother, who was a teacher, who permits the family to live. (smile) Then he clamb the ladders of the society. With him, i learnt what really means the word "work" and that was possible to succeed in a world which didn't seems perfect to reach your goals.

TM: Is it right that your family is Jewish?
CR: Rubin is Jewish's name, but i'm not Jewish as i didn't have formation about that religion. But my relatives always taught me that when you're lucky to receive a lot from the life, it's important to give to the others, to those who have less. That's why through charities' event i personnaly organized, i try to do it. That's to promote tennis in favor of handicaped children and some who live in difficult situation of life.

TM: Who were your idols when you were child?

CR: I can't say i really have idolsI don't remember to have say to myself: "i want to be like this player." But i liked to watch some players more than others. Steffi Graf for instance. I appreciated a lot too Ivan Lendl. Obviously, Zina Garrison and Lori Mc Neil. Zina, who lived at two hours from my house, was the first professionnal to hit some balls with me. I remember her final in Wimbledon in 1990. I definitely believed she could win this, but i was deceived by the final's result.

TM: You have mentionned Graf and Lendl who were very serious on the court. Was it their professionnalism that you appreciated?
CR: Yes it does. I never liked players who are "too much" on the court, like Mc Enroe did, who could become furious during a match. My preferences were elsewhere because i always liked discretion and silent. Graf and Lendl weren't the most expressive, but their games were agressive. I always appreciated this contrast which is too on my game. I'm a quiet person, but my game is not. (smile). To finish with Lendl i'd like to say that i loved his sense of humor, very particular. With his Czech's accent, he could say some jokes absolutely irresistibles. (smile)

TM: Do you Yannick Noah?
CR:I met him several times, but i don't have alots of a souvenir about him as a player. He was relative to Arthur Ashe who has been very important for me.

TM: Why was he so important for you?
CR: He was a symbol of American's sport, an icon for so much people. I met him at several occasions, but when he died, i only was 17 years old.
Our talkings hasn't be so numerous, but Benny Sims knew him since a lots of time. And i knew that Benny talked about me to Arthur when he discovered me, and then, he often asked Benny about the evolution of my improvements.

TM:In 1997, during the inauguration of the Stadium Arthur Ashe, you had the honor to be officially the first to play on this court...
CR:That was a great honor, but i couldn't appreciate that as i wasn't playing good at all. I lost this day. On the moment, i didn't pay attention about this honor because of the defeat, but with the time, i realize that was a good moment. Arthur Ashe was more than a big player, he was an extraordinary human being.

TM: Arthur Ashe would have appreciated the avent of Venus and Serena Williams. How would you dexcribe the impact they have in the USA, in particularly in the Black Communauty?
CR: I believe they don't have an impact in USA, but in the world. Everybody have been surprised and impressed by their avent. They did something historical and showed to a lots of people in America, or even Africa, that tennis is a universal's sport today.

TM: You have beaten Serena last summer in LA, and you almost dismiss Venus at the US Open later. Don't you have any complex against them?
CR: Why should I? That'd be sad to come into the court with the idea that i don't have any chance to win. Everybody has weaknesses, and everyone can be beaten. That's fact, that's obvious. You have to believe in you. In tennis, that's the first quality: to have confidence in yourself. Look at Serena and Venus: they grew up with the idea that they were the best players. They became the best because they believed it. Richard Williams never said to his daughters they were too slow: he always said they were the fastest.

TM: do you remember about your first meeting with the sisters?

CR: I think it was during a clinic, in Philadelphia. Venus was about 11 years old. She and Serena were thin, with a long legs and arms. (smile). It was possible to observe that they had potential, but to imagine what they'd become today... But i spoke to Richard, and it was clear he knew where they were going. The thing which is extraordinary is that they succeeded to realize the dream that the father made for hers. That's strong and maybe unique in the story of the sport.

TM:The Tour seems to be a place where the money is easily earned, where the life is good to be live. How do you feel in this world?
CR: I worked to be where i am. Nothing has been given to me. And i appreciate this life without forgetting to look what happens around me, for example, with the fondation i created in Louisiane.

TM: What does it consists in?
CR: The project is to help young people to discover tennis by organizing some events in Louisiane or the south of USA. I give money or i try to organize charities' events. Venus, Serena, Jim Courier, Malivai Washington, Mary Pierce and Mary Joe Fernandez already came to help for instance.

TM: To conclude, a question to defy your legendar's quietly. When, the last time, have you been angry?
About me, you'd never say on court "My God, she seems so angry!" I'm trying to let frustration inside my mind. (smile)Like Lendl did it when he was angry with the umpire.He woud never break a racquet. But you could se in his face that he really was furious! (laughing)

Enjoy :)
 

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Chanda's great. I liked the interview.
 
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what a great interview! :worship: @ Chanda.
 

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I love Chanda, she is just so great and so sweet. How can you not love her??

:hearts: :worship: :hearts: :worship: :hearts:
 

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Chanda=smart and classy!
 

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Thank you for another informative post, Kuti Kis&Monica. :) Your translation was excellent! I am unclear on a couple of things:

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TM: How is he as a man?
CR: He always has strong opinions. I'd say that he "feels" goos the persons he meets. I believe in what i do, but he believes in me too. We sometimes get tenser, but never quarrels. I argue, he argues, and then we find a compromise.
What does "I'd say that he "feels" goos the persons he meets." mean?

*
TM: Do you Yannick Noah?
CR:I met him several times, but i don't have alots of a souvenir about him as a player. He was relative to Arthur Ashe who has been very important for me.
Does this mean that Yannick reminded Chanda of Arthur Ashe because of the way he carries himself?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~​

I thought this interview was very enlightening. I liked learning more about Chanda's family and her coach. (That Bud Collins is quite a guy, huh, Brian?) I thought her coach was a strong, passionate, yet, silent man. I got this impression from a comment he made during Chanda's injury come back last year and from his expression after her loss at this year's Wimbledon. In a comment he made after Chanda beat Lindsay in a California final, he said he was convinced that Chanda had the game to be a champion and he lamented that she doesn't get the recognition she deserves. I also liked learning more about Chanda's charity. I like her demeanor as well. I like to be loud and demonstrative when I'm around people I trust. But, I like to "fly under the radar" and focus intently on goals in my professional dealings.

I hope that Chanda can win a major before she retires. I think a lot of thinks have to go right, though - her health, game, mental toughness, and some one has to take out the big hitters or they have to have an off day. She's work for it. I wish her all the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
jmp said:
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What does "I'd say that he "feels" goos the persons he meets." mean?

*

Does this mean that Yannick reminded Chanda of Arthur Ashe because of the way he carries himself?
1/ Sorry that was "he feels good the persons he meets."
It means that her coach guess fastly if people he meets are good or bad persons.

2/Sorry again, the question was "Do you know Y.N.?"
BTW, Chanda just explained that she knows that Ashe was important for Noah, and that was the same for her. But no that Noah reminded her Ashe the way he carries himself.

I'm glad that you all appreciated the interview :)
 
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