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Discussion Starter #21
VETERAN FINDS HER OLD SKILLS TO GIVE YOUNGSTER A LESSON
Alan Clarkson
January 6, 1987
Sydney Morning Herald

"There is still some life in the old girl yet," Sharon Walsh-Pete said with a grin as she walked off an outside White City court yesterday after beating one of Australia's better younger players.

Walsh-Pete outskilled Janine Thompson, 19, in a straight sets 6-4 7-5 victory in the first round of the $230,000 Family Circle NSW Open.

Walsh-Pete, who will turn 35 next month, had to battle her way into the tournament through the qualifying rounds.

She has played only five singles tournaments since competing in the Ford Australian Open 13 months ago mainly because of a series of injuries.

"I always told myself that if I had to play qualifying rounds I would give it away," she said after the match.

"I don't really know why I changed my mind.

"I think it came down to the fact that I wanted to play one more year. My future is still in tennis, but in which direction I am not sure just yet."

Walsh-Pete gave her rival a real lesson with Thompson hitting the ball as if she was trying to win every point with a single shot.

She hit some good shots but found it difficult to string them together and eventually bowed to Walsh-Pete's greater consistency, clever returning and more accurate volleying.

Former titleholder Dianne Balestrat, who was persuaded to play in the event only at the last minute, also scored an impressive 6-1 7-6 (7-2) win over Gigi Fernandez.

Balestrat originally intended overlooking the NSW Open to concentrate on training for the Ford Australian Open, which starts at Kooyong next Monday.

It was only after her disappointing display in Brisbane last week that she accepted a wild card entry to the NSW event.

Balestrat still trains harder than most other women on the circuit, working out in the gym with weights, repetition work and lots of sprinting.

At present she is ranked 25th in the world but has an aim to make it into the top 15 before the end of the year.

The way she handled the swirling conditions on centre court yesterday Balestrat is on course to fulfil her ambition.

Nicole Provis had one of the most important wins of her career with a 6-2 3-6 6-0 win over the current Australian junior champion, Jenny Byrne.

Provis, another of the army of young women with a double-handed backhand, was far too consistent for the erratic Byrne.

Provis looked to have control of the match in the second set but she began missing returns and allowed Byrne to lift her game. Byrne subsequently won the set but again she found her opponent's revitalised form in the third set too much to handle.

Another young Australian, Michelle Jaggard, could easily have scored an upset had she been able to hold service.

But in an incredible final set against former titleholder Jo Durie only one service was held in 10 games.

Jaggard, 19, played some superb tennis but could not capitalise on her chances and she lost 6-3 3-6 6-4 to Durie, who hit some great shots on critical points.

Durie, ranked 12th for the NSW title, was playing her first tournament yesterday after a seven-week lay-off. Although Britain's No 1 player she can thank her greater experience for her first-round win.

From the start she had to battle against Jaggard's aggressive play.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Headline unavailable
UPI NewsTrack
January 6, 1987

Etsuko Inoue of Japan upset fourth-seed Claudia Kohde-Kilsch 6-4, 6-2 Tuesday in the second round of the $150,000 New South Wales Women's Open tennis tournament.

It was the first time the diminutive Inoue, ranked 80th in the world, beat the lanky West German in four meetings. Inoue earned her victory with a low-mistake performance from the back of the court.

Second-seed Pam Shriver of Lutherville, Md., blitzed Britain's Sara Gomer 6-1, 6-2 to steam into the third round.

Shriver was down break point only once in the match, and her powerful serve-volley game was well into the groove as she prepares for next week's Australian Open at Melbourne.

Anne Smith of San Antonio, Texas, eliminated 13th-seed Carling Bassett of Canada in straight sets, 6-4, 6-4, in the first round, while Australian Diane Balestrat was forced to default her second-round match against Elise Burgin of Baltimore because of dehydration and a virus that required hospitalization.

Zina Garrison of Houston was untroubled as she slipped past Molly Van Nostrand of Brightwaters, N.Y., 6-3, 6-2, while Australia's Federation Cup captain Wendy Turnbull dispatched Terry Holladay of Del Mar, Calif., 6-1, 6-1.

Fifth-seeded Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria and No. 7 seed Lori McNeil of the U.S. also made the final 16.

Maleeva belied her lack of grass-court experience in crushing Julie Richardson of New Zealand 6-1, 6-3. McNeil, a resident of Houston as is Garrison, had to struggle for her 6-3, 4-6, 7-6 triumph over West German Eva Pfaff.

Third-seed Helena Sukova of Czechoslovakia had plenty in reserve in her second-round match against Ann Henriksson of Mahtomedi, Minn., winning 6-1, 6-2, and Swede Caterina Lindqvist downed Sharon Walsh-Pete of Novato, Calif., with an identical scoreline.

The tournament was rocked by the close, but tantrum-marred, first-round match between Britain's Anne Hobbs and Helen Kelesi of Canada. Kelesi lashed out at the umpires, suggesting they ''shape up or ship out,'' after she fell 7-6 (7-4), 6-7 (4-7), 6-4 in a three-hour contest that included racquet-throwing, scowling and swearing by both players.

Kelesi was upset by a number of umpiring decisions late in the match and a series of line calls that went against her.

''It was ridiculous out there,'' she said after storming off the court. ''This was the worst linejudging I have ever come across and if I ever get that umpire again I'll default.''

Both players received official warnings from umpire Peter Deacon, and tournament officials were meeting overnight to determine whether disciplinary action should be taken against either player.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Why is it that the quality of the officiating seems to get worse when the hotheads play? :lol:

OPEN PAIR REPORTED FOR SWEARING
Alan Clarkson
January 7, 1987
Sydney Morning Herald

Two players in the $230,000 Family Circle NSW Women's Open at White City yesterday were reported for swearing during a fiery match.

The players, England's Ann Hobbs and Canada's Helen Kelesi, exploded after some very doubtful decisions during their three-set second-round match.

Tournament referee Bill Gilmour was at the end of the court when Hobbs yelled out to a group of English supporters in the stand.

She was serving for the match when two serves which appeared to be clean aces were both called faults.

"That's two f---ing aces I have served that have been disallowed," she yelled.

Gilmour went on to the court at the end of the game. He told the umpire, Peter Duncan, what had happened and Hobbs was issued with a code violation.

At the end of the game, which she lost, Hobbs yelled at the supporters again.

In the tense finish, Kelesi lost the match on another doubtful call.

With the crowd yelling, the umpire did not hear the call of "out". He asked the linesman to repeat the call. The linesman said the ball was "out", which gave Hobbs the match 7-6 6-7 6-4.

It was a very doubtful call and Hobbs probably reasoned that it made up for the two services that were called faults in the previous game.

With tears streaming down her face, the Canadian girl stormed off the court without shaking hands.

Hobbs went over and shook hands with Kelesi, who was sitting and fuming.

Kelesi said later she would consider forfeiting if she was ever drawn in a match umpired by Duncan.

As Kelesi walked off the court she yelled at Duncan: "You are f---ing incompetent."

That was also reported.

In the second set Duncan was advised that Kelesi could be receiving some outside coaching.

Duncan soon after warned Kelesi about receiving coaching from a male spectator.

The incidents are now in the hands of Pam Whytcross, the new tour director who has a tough situation in this, her first major tournament since her appointment.

Both players were highly critical of the standard of umpiring and line calling and it seemed that there was some justification for their complaints.

It was a day of high drama.

The major upset of the day was the 6-4 6-2 defeat of the fourth-seeded Claudia Kohde-Kilsch by the improved Japanese player Etsuko Inoue.

Inoue, who is ranked 80th in the world and is on her fifth trip to Australia, had to finish off an uncompleted match before going into her second-round clash against the tall West German.

With the scores locked at one set all when bad light stopped play on Monday night against Ann de Vries, Inoue had to battle to take out the deciding third set 7-5 to win the match 7-6 4-6 7-5.

The gritty Japanese player was far too consistent yesterday for Kohde-Kilsch, who was very tentative and at no stage seemed likely to produce the quality of tennis to win.

It was the first time in four matches that Inoue had beaten Kohde-Kilsch, the highest ranked player she has beaten.

For Elizabeth Smylie it was a disappointing day when she was eliminated in three gruelling sets by the tall South African Elna Reinach, 6-2 3-6 6-3.

The two players had a tough match in Brisbane last week but on that occasion Smylie won 6-4 in the third set.

She thought she had a better chance if she stayed back and rallied with the South African, but it did not work.

Reinach, who hits a double-handed backhand with unerring accuracy, relished the opportunity to play the match from the back court and generally outrallied the Australian girl.

Smylie trailed 2-0 in the second set but fought back and took the set. Her failure to get her returns back at critical stages in the third set was a match decider.

Pam Shriver, second seed for the tournament, looked in excellent touch when she crushed Sara Gomer 6-1 6-2 to go into the third round.

Shriver is enjoying her tennis, and while there is the usual intensity in her play she is not as demanding of herself off the court.

She has other diversions from her sport. She is involved in projects in her home city of Baltimore, she is promoting her book and her holiday home has just been completed.

Over the Thanksgiving weekend Shriver organised a tennis weekend which raised about $180,000 for one of her favourite charities.

"In my weeks off I don't feel I have to practise three hours a day," she said.

"If I have 10 days off I won't hit for five days and I know if I stay in shape by riding a bike or doing my weight work then it takes only three or four days to get my eye in.

"I find that I don't get sick of it as much. That's what Martina (Navratilova) does.

"She will go ski-ing for two weeks then about five days before the event she will start to hit again.

"You get a little smarter as you get older, fortunately."

Wendy Turnbull had a strong 6-1 6-1 win over Terry Holladay and was pleased with the result of some hard work she has done since the disappointment of being beaten early in the Brisbane tournament.

Twelfth-seeded Jo Durie, a former titleholder, double faulted on match point to lose to Camille Benjamin 7-5 6-4, while another seed, Dianne Balestrat, was forced to withdraw from the singles and doubles.

Balestrat was taken to hospital yesterday with a viral infection but she was released and expects to play in the Ford Australian Open starting at Kooyong next Monday.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Tennis: Tantrums delays Hobbs win
The Times
London, England
January 7, 1987
From BARRY WOOD, SYDNEY

Anne Hobbs reached the second round of the Family Circle New South Wales women's open tournament here yesterday but in controversial circumstances. Her 7-6, 6-7, 6-4 win over Helen Kelesi, aged 17, from Canada, was marred by a number of disputed line calls which first conspired to delay the British player's victory and then gave her the match.

In a dramatic struggle lasting nearly three hours, and with little to choose between the two contestants, Miss Hobbs found herself leading 5-3, 30-30 in the final set. She then hit what appeared to be two aces, but each time they were called out by the linesman and upheld by chair umpire, Peter Duncan. The tables were turned however, at 5-4, when a forehand from Miss Kelesi was called long and gave Miss Hobbs the match.

Miss Kelesi was stunned and argued long and hard with Mr Duncan to no avail. All she received was a warning for swearing. The crisis point for Miss Hobbs came as the second set slipped away. 'I started to get on top in the second set, but then she began to hit the ball harder and deeper and pushing me back,' the Briton said. 'I was a little tentative and my serve let me down, and I was a bit concerned going into the third set.

'Fortunately at two love, I totally relaxed and went back to serving the way I had in the first set. I'd been tossing the ball too far forward which is a mistake I tend to make. Once my serve came back I was quite confortable.'

The difference between victory and defeat were reflected in each player's opinion of the officiating. 'I feel for the umpire because he must get tired and lose his concentration' Miss Hobbs said. 'He was out there for three hours and he made three unfortunate errors right at the end of the match. '

But Miss Kelesi was scathing in her criticism. 'This match was at the worst line judging I have ever come across,' she said. 'It so frustrating it makes you not want to hit the lines because they might call it out. If I ever get that umpire again I'm going to default. '

Two other British players, Jo Durie and Sara Gomer, failed to progress, with Miss Durie putting on another disappointing performance, against Camille Benjamin, of the United States, and Miss Gomer making little impression against another American, Pam Shriver.

RESULTS: First Round: E Reinach (SA), bt E Smylie (Aus), 6-2, 3-6, 6-3; W Turnbull (Aus), bt T Holladay (US), 6-1. 6-1, A Smith (US), bt C Bassett (Can), 6-4, 6-4; A Hobbs (GB), bt H Kelesi (Can), 7-6, 6-7, 6-4; E Inoue (Japan), bt A de Vries (Bel), 7-6, 4-6, 7-5; D van Rensburg (SA), bt B Nagelsen (US), 7-6, 6-2. Second round: Z Garrison (US), bt M Van Nostrand (US), 6-3, 6-2; P Shriver (US); bt S Gomer (GB), 6-1, 6-2; H Sukova (Cz), bt A Henricksson (US), 6-1, 6-2; E Burgin (U S), bt D Balestrat (Aus), (walkover); Inoue, bt C Kohde-Kilsch (WG), 6-4, 6-2; C Benjamin (US), bt J Durie (GB), 7-5, 6-4; M Maleeva (Bul), bt J Richardson (NZ), 6-1, 6-3; A Fernandez (US), bt E Minter (Aus), 7-6, 6-7, 7-5; L McNeil (US), bt E Pfaff (WG), 6-3, 4-6, 7-6; G Rush (US), bt T Mochizuki (US), 6-4, 6-3.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Their Ginny joins the committee.

Sport (In Brief): Feaver joins - Tennis
The Times
London, England
Jan. 7, 1987
*
John Feaver, the former British Davis Cup player, has replaced Mark Cox as a member of the Wimbledon management committee alongside another seasoned professional in Virginia Wade.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
The regular tennis media never did quite understand that "Bild" is not exactly the most credible source.

REGULAR SHORTS
January 7, 1987
Sydney Morning Herald

[...]

Becker, Martina to team up

HAMBURG, Tuesday: Wimbledon champions Boris Becker and Martina Navratilova plan to team up to play mixed doubles at grand slam tennis tournaments this year, according to German newspaper reports.

The mass-circulation Bild said Navratilova had been in contact with Becker's manager, Ion Tiriac, on several occasions asking that he arrange for her to play mixed doubles with Becker.

According to its report, "Becker had declined" until now.

But on Saturday Tiriac called Navratilova and told her the 19-year-old West German was willing to team up with the American.

Navratilova, winner of 15 Wimbledon titles, wanted to break Billie Jean King's record of 20 titles at Wimbledon.

The newspaper said Becker and Navratilova would play mixed doubles at Wimbledon and the French and US Open championships.

Navratilova won her seventh singles title at Wimbledon last year. Becker won his second consecutive singles crown.

[...]
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Tracy Awesome was slumming it...

Austin selected parade marshal
Daily Breeze
Torrance, CA
January 7, 1987

Tracy Austin, former U.S. Open Tennis women's champion and a graduate of Rolling Hills High School, will be the grand marshal of Saturday's 6th annual Youth on Parade.

The parade will wind through the business and commercial district of Rolling Hills Estates and culminate with a marching band concert on the field at Rolling Hills High.

Austin's tennis career is highlighted by numerous tournament and individual victories from the time she was 7. She played in her first women's open at 14 and was the youngest entrant ever at Wimbledon.

In 1978, she was Junior Wimbledon champion and went four rounds in the main Wimbledon draw before losing to Martina Navratilova. She ranked No. 1 in the National Girls 16 and 18 divisions while also being ranked among the world's top 10 women. That same year, at age 15, she ended Navratilova's 37-match win streak, and a year later, at the Italian Open, she stopped Chris Evert-Lloyd's six-year, 125-match clay court win streak. In October 1978, Austin turned professional and went on to win a tournament in Stuttgart, West Germany.

In 1980, she and her brother John became the only brother-sister team to win the Wimbledon mixed doufles. Her remarkable career earned her The Associated Press Female of the Year Award in 1979 and 1981.

Because of a series of injuries, she played intermittently in 1982 and 1983; she was inactive in 1984 and 1985.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
European women roll in USTA tournament
Chicago Sun-Times
January 7, 1987

Europeans won three of the six matches yesterday in the the first round of the $10,000 USTA Women's Circuit of Chicago tournament at Mid-Town Tennis Club.

Brenda Shultz of Holland, defeated Holly Lloyd, Deerfield, 6-3, 7-6 (7-3); Heidi Sprung, Austria, topped Katrina Adams, Chicago, 4-6, 7-6 (12-10), 6-4, and Simone Schilder, Holland, stopped Jan Blackstad, Highland Park, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
And once the local interest stories lost, the coverage stops.

Top 2 seeds defeated in first round
Chicago Sun-Times
January 8, 1987
Len Ziehm

Mary Lou Piatek and Evonne Vermaak, the top seeded players, were upset yesterday in the first round of the $10,000 U.S. Tennis Association women's tourney at Mid-Town Tennis Club.

Piatek, from Munster, Ind., was ousted by Lindsey Bartlett of Portola Valley, Calif., 0-6, 6-4, 6-4, and Vermaak, a South African living in Chicago, fell to Lake Zurich's Linda Harvey-Wild 6-1, 6-4.

Former Wimbledon champion Billie Jean King, a late entry into the doubles portion of the fifth annual event that concludes Saturday, will make her tourney debut today.

King and partner Ilana Kloss will face Evonne Derkinderen and Mara Eykenboom of Holland in a first-round match expected to start about 2 p.m.

Piatek and Vermaak, the top-seeded doubles team, also are scheduled to compete at that time against Erika Smith of Piedmont, Calif., and Liz Morrman of Huntsville, Ala.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
King is struggling - Billie Jean set to cut weight, increase play
Chicago Sun-Times
January 9, 1987
Len Ziehm

The competitive juices were still there, but Billie Jean King didn't look the same when she returned to the tennis wars yesterday.

King, 43, played doubles at the $10,000 U.S. Tennis Association Women's Circuit of Chicago tourney at Mid-Town Tennis Club.

The tourney, which concludes tomorrow, is for pro hopefuls who want to make it onto the Virginia Slims tour that King once dominated. Yesterday King and Ilana Kloss, a doubles champion at the 1976 U.S. Open, joined forces to beat Amy Frazier, 14, and Nancy Wilson, 17, of Toronto in a first-round match.

"I'm trying to exercise again," said King, who couldn't remember the last time she played against young pros in anything other than an exhibition.

"I need to lose another 15 pounds. My goal is start playing three times a week again. The more I play, the more I enjoy it."

In addition to her surgically-repaired knees, King has another noticeable physical problem.

She's contracted a skin disease called vitiligo.

"I'm losing my pigmentation," she said. "It's an hereditary thing, and I started getting it when I was 37 or 38. It's much worse now."

To combat it she wears sweat pants and long-sleeved tops whenever she's on the court.

King has competed in senior exhibitions since her heyday, but that's about all. Last year she joined forces with Pat Freebody, Mid-Town's manager, to win the USTA Women's 40 Indoor Doubles Championship. They will defend their title in February at Mid-Town.

Before then, however, King hopes to stir some excitement in Chicago with an announcement on her Team Tennis franchise. The Chicago Fire has hung on since 1981 despite small crowds.

"Chicago is our toughest market," said King, who is the Team Tennis commissioner in addition to owning the Chicago team.

King said the monthlong Team Tennis season will begin in early July. She has dropped the franchise in Corpus Christi, Texas, but added Charlotte, N.C., and New Jersey.

"It's going to be great," she said. "It's taken a lot of work, but I can finally sit down and start to breathe." And play some more tennis.
 

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And once the local interest stories lost, the coverage stops.

Top 2 seeds defeated in first round
Chicago Sun-Times
January 8, 1987
Len Ziehm

Mary Lou Piatek and Evonne Vermaak, the top seeded players, were upset yesterday in the first round of the $10,000 U.S. Tennis Association women's tourney at Mid-Town Tennis Club.

Piatek, from Munster, Ind., was ousted by Lindsey Bartlett of Portola Valley, Calif., 0-6, 6-4, 6-4, and Vermaak, a South African living in Chicago, fell to Lake Zurich's Linda Harvey-Wild 6-1, 6-4.

Former Wimbledon champion Billie Jean King, a late entry into the doubles portion of the fifth annual event that concludes Saturday, will make her tourney debut today.

King and partner Ilana Kloss will face Evonne Derkinderen and Mara Eykenboom of Holland in a first-round match expected to start about 2 p.m.

Piatek and Vermaak, the top-seeded doubles team, also are scheduled to compete at that time against Erika Smith of Piedmont, Calif., and Liz Morrman of Huntsville, Ala.
Actually, Linda Harvey-Wild (later to go by just Linda Wild) is listed as from Lake Zurich, a northwest suburb of Chicago, and throughout her career she gave Hawthorne Woods (a suburb right by Lake Zurich) as her hometown... so she was always a local Chicago girl 0:).
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Actually, Linda Harvey-Wild (later to go by just Linda Wild) is listed as from Lake Zurich, a northwest suburb of Chicago, and throughout her career she gave Hawthorne Woods (a suburb right by Lake Zurich) as her hometown... so she was always a local Chicago girl 0:).
Well, somebody should have told the Sun-Times that. Then again, nobody pays too much attention to the geography of these perpetually war-torn, perpetually bankrupt foreign countries like Chicago, Detroit, Miami, and Puerto Rico. :eek:h:
 

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Discussion Starter #33
HANA PLAYS UP TO HER POTENTIAL
Alan Clarkson
January 8, 1987
Sydney Morning Herald

Hana Mandlikova is approaching her goal of becoming the best woman tennis player in the world.

Hitting her ground strokes with authority and her volleys with remarkable precision, she crushed the young South African Elna Reinach 6-1 6-3.

Reinach, who beat Liz Smylie in the previous round, did not play badly. She was simply outplayed by Mandlikova, who is playing a lot better than her world ranking of four.

Mandlikova went into yesterday's match after having a hole drilled through the nail of her big toe on her right foot.

The new pair of shoes she wore on Tuesday were a fraction too small and a blood blister formed under her toenail.

In Tuesday evening's doubles match Mandlikova had to have a five-minute injury break while she received attention for the injury.

After the match a hole was bored through the nail to release the congealed blood.

There has never been the slightest doubt that Mandlikova was one of the most gifted tennis players in the world.

As her coach, Betty Stove, pointed out yesterday, there was still room for improvement in Mandlikova's game.

Stove compared Mandlikova's game to that of a roulette player who bets on 12 numbers and one who plunges on simply one.

"The one who bets on 12 numbers may win in the long run, but Hana does not play like that," she said.

"She can stay back and rally but she does not like to play that kind of tennis.

"She is prepared to take risks. That is the way she enjoys the game."

Stove did not agree that Mandlikova lacked consistency, the label that has been attached to her after a couple of uncharacteristic performances.

"It is hard for Hana to stay healthy. She is not built like a truck but she is a finely tuned athlete," Stove said.

Mandlikova, fresh from her triumph in winning the Queensland Open, expected a tougher match from her South African opponent.

They met in an early round of the US Open when Reinach, according to Mandlikova, played a lot better.

"She has great ground strokes which sit very low and especially on grass. I was surprised she did not play better," Mandlikova said.

"Overall, I think I played pretty good."

Mandlikova said it was not as difficult to maintain the high standard she had set herself.

"I think I have played so many tournaments and so many matches that you know what you are doing," she said.

"I know I have to rest for one day all day and just do whatever I want to.

"It is just a matter of knowing yourself and doing the right things.

"I still feel that I can reach the potential I wanted to reach. Obviously, I want to be No 1 one day and I will work hard to reach that potential.

"I am as happy as I have ever been in my life. As long as you are happy you are able to do so many things."

Mandlikova does not feel that marriage has changed her, although it has made her happier and that helps her tennis because she is more relaxed.

While she is relaxed she caused some nervous palpitations in the stands during the postponed final of the Queensland doubles championship - Mandlikova and Wendy Turnbull against Liz Smylie and Betsy Nagelsen.

Watching the match were Peter Smylie, Liz's husband, and Mark McCormack, who is married to Betsy Nagelsen.

Between them they played every shot, but it did not do their wives much good.

Against the consistency of Mandlikova and Turnbull they were beaten 6-4 6-3.

The husbands could console themselves that it ws the first time in 11 matches that their wives had been beaten in a doubles match.

Turnbull, the top-ranked Australia, showed the difference between those who are in the top bracket and the youngsters clawing their way up the ladder

Turnbull was far too experienced, although she was not as consistent as she would like to be in beating the talented Nicole Provis 6-2 7-6 (7-4).

Provis was overawed by the centre court stage in the first set but she rallied in the second set and had two set points but could not withstand the pressure mounted by Turnbull when it mattered.

Provis learnt that she has to work harder on the "big" points and this was one of the major differences between the two players.

In the other main matches yesterday Zina Garrison beat Camille Benjamin 6-4 6-2, Anne Minter toppled the English girl Anne Hobbs 2-6 6-3 6-3 and Dinky van Rensburg beat Robin White 6-3 2-6 6-1.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Tennis: Hobbs has to bow to fatigue
The Times
London, England
January 8, 1987
BARRY WOOD, SYDNEY

Anne Hobbs, of Cheshire, yesterday failed to follow up her fighting victory over Helen Kelesi, of Canada, losing 2-6, 6-3, 6-3, to Anne Minter, from Melbourne, in the second round of the Family Circle New South Wales women's open tournament here.

The beginning of the match was delayed for a couple of minutes while officials tried to remove a pink-breasted galah - a parrot-type bird - from the court. A delay of several hours would have suited Miss Hobbs better. She found it difficult to raise her game to overcome a very much in-form opponent.

Following her three-hour singles match against Miss Kelesi the day before, she had joined Jo Durie in a first round doubles match, losing in three sets to Elise Burgin and Rosalyn Fairbank - and it all took its toll.

'It's a fact that I played five and a half hours of tennis yesterday,' Miss Hobbs said. 'Quite frankly, I would have liked to have delayed the match. I'm disappointed because I could have beaten her in any other tournament if I'd have had a day's rest or not played the doubles last night. I am pretty shattered, and whoever it was today was going to be tough for me.'

It would have been asking a lot for Miss Hobbs, even though she feels particularly fit, to recover sufficiently to produce her best tennis against Miss Minter. But she refused to blame her defeat entirely on fatigue. 'The first set went my way purely and simply because I just played well. She made a lot of errors and didn't pass well,' Miss Hobbs said. 'I think she was a little nervy in the beginning and didn't quite know what to do.

'But she just came out steamrolling at the beginning of the second set and then I was down all the way. She began to pass me on my serve and I was getting nowhere near it. I was always two feet behind. I changed my serve to help me get in faster and started hitting to her forehand but she hit winners off it. There was awful lot that I tried to do but she had an answer for it.'

Meanwhile, the quaintly-named Dinky van Rensberg, who first came to international attention when she reached the quarter-finals of the Dow Chemical Classic in Birmingham last summer and has improved her world ranking over the past year by 300 places, upset the eighth seed, Robin White, of the United States, 6-3, 2-6, 6-1.

RESULTS: Second round: D Van Rensburg (SA) bt R White (US), 6-3, 2-6, 6-1; W Turnbull (Aus) bt N Provis (Aus), 6-1, 7-6; H Mandlikova (Cz) bt E Reinach (SA), 6-1, 6-3; A Smith (US) bt P Hy (HK), 6-1, 6-1; A Minter (Aus) bt A Hobbs (GB), 2-6, 6-3, 6-3. Third round: Z Garrison (US) bt C Benjamin (US), 6-4, 6-2; L McNeil (US) bt E Burgin (US), 6-1, 4-6, 6-2.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
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January 7, 1987
United Press International
*
SYDNEY, Australia -- Top-seeded Hana Mandlikova cruised into the third round of the $150,000 Family Circle New South Wales Open Wednesday with a 6-1, 6-3 victory over South African Elna Reinach.

Making her first appearance on the slick grass center court of White City, Mandlikova needed less than an hour to subdue Reinach, a baseliner. Mandlikova is using the Sydney event to prepare for next week's Australian Open, which will be the last played at the historic Kooyong Courts in Melbourne.

Mandlikova, 25 next month, next faces her doubles partner, Australian Wendy Turnbull, for a quarterfinal berth and said all friendships will be forgotten.

''Wendy is a good friend of mine but on court nobody is my friend. I just go after the ball and don't see who is on the other side of the net,'' she said.

Oddly, Mandlikova faced Reinach and Turnbull in consecutive matches at the U.S. Open last year, losing to Turnbull in a fourth round upset.

Mandlikova, who married an Australian citizen last year and recently applied for Australian citizenship, is commanding plenty of extra attention from media representatives and tennis fans in Australia.

The veteran Turnbull reached the third round meeting with a 6-1, 7-6 (7-4) decision over Nicole Provis of Sydney.

South African Dinky van Rensburg sprang the day's biggest upset by ousting Robin White of Fort Worth, Texas, the 8th seed. Van Rensburg belied her world No. 69 ranking with a 6-3, 2-6, 6-1 triumph over White, who has a world ranking of 16 and a wealth of experience on grass.

Zina Garrison of Houston was the first player into the quarterfinals when she overpowered Camille Benjamin of Fort Worth, 6-4, 6-2, while Lori McNeil of Houston took two hours and 10 minutes to join her close friend in the last eight by beating Elise Burgin of Baltimore, Md., 6-1, 4-6, 6-2.

Hard-hitting Australian Anne Minter overcame early problems with her service to beat Britain's Anne Hobbs, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3, while Anne Smith of San Antonio, Texas, never was troubled by Hong Kong's Patricia Hy, winning the second round match, 6-1, 6-1.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
The Brits had not yet resigned themselves to the fact the situation was hopeless but not serious.

Tennis: British women claim to be moving in the right direction
The Times
London, England
January 8, 1987
BARRY WOOD, SYDNEY

On the face of it, nothing much seems to have changed as far as the fortunes of British women's tennis is concerned in 1987. The straight sets' defeat suffered this week by two British players, Jo Durie and Sara Gomer, by Americans in the second round of the New South Wales open tournament in Sydney hardly indicates that this year is going to be any better than 1986, which, on a team basis, was a total disaster.

A first-round crushing by lowly Denmark in the Federation Cup in Prague was followed by a 7-0 whitewash by a second rate American team in the Wightman Cup on home ground at the Albert Hall.

But, conversely, individual performances by some leading players have shown promise. The exception was Annabel Croft, masquerading as Britain's No 1 on the basis that on the week the new rankings were announced last year, she was placed above Miss Durie on the computer.

Miss Croft admitted openly that she had considered retiring before her success in San Diego in May, 1985, resulted in her first tournament title and a period of respectability. Those thoughts crossed her mind again during 1986 and, although she pulled off a couple of victories at the US Open, they were isolated successes in a dismal year.

She has been concerned enough to take several weeks off, to work on her fitness and game. After forgoing the Australian circuit, Miss Croft returns in February in Oklahoma and will be encouraged by the knowledge that the smallest success will offset last year's lost computer points and lift her up the rankings again.

Miss Durie, now restored to the No 1 position, had a fine year and continued to climb back towards the world's top 20 once again. In fact, she moved up to 19th before finishing the year at 24. Her ling-time coach, Alan Jones, considered that her progress would have been even more pronounced if it had not been for some niggling injuries.

''There are times when her tennis still isn't good enough, and Jo is always the first to say 'Yes, I've got to improve' or 'I wasn't good enough today'. But what people don't realize is the number of times Jo has plugged away at tournaments when a lot of people would have pulled out because of injury,'' he said.

A severe back injury that required surgery and kept her out of tennis for most of 1981 still plays on her mind. ''Subconsciously, I can't forget about my back operation,'' she said. ''I know that the same thing isn't going to happen again, but I suppose it's always in the back of my mind.

''That doesn't help my confidence, and it makes me hold back sometimes because I know that if I go into a certain position it's going to hurt.''

Despite her progress during the past year, in which she has become a better player than when she reached the top five three years ago, she has received a lot of criticism. ''It makes me mad when people say that I haven't had a good year. I reached the quarter-finals of three tournaments and the semi-finals of Mahwah, where I went three sets with Steffi Graf. Throughout the year, I've had pretty steady results.''

Along with Miss Durie's progress, British hopes for the future have been boosted by the steady development of Miss Gomer, whose enormous maturity over the past 12 months has been reflected in many fighting performances. The girl from Torquay has threatened several of the leading players and a major victory is not far away. ''The year exceeded my expectations,'' Miss Gomer enthused. ''Much of my success is due to Ken Fletcher. I worked with him solidly for a month after Wimbledon, the hardest I've ever worked, and then I went out to America and had my best results. I now put far more thought into the game.''

For Anne Hobbs, the year was another frustrating round of injuries. She was unable to follow up her tournament victory in New Zealand at the end of 1985, and her ranking subsequently slumped to 99 by the end of the year. Nevertheless, she maintains her positive outlook. ''Looking into 1987, my main ambition is to play the full year,'' she said. ''In 1986, I was out for four or five months with a double stomach muscle injury. The split from my coach, Chris Bradnam, really upset me, but we got back together in September.

''Now I'm very fit, probably the fittest I've ever been. Mentally I'm strong. I'm giving myself another three years. I mean, I'm not going to be a world number one, but during the last few months I feel I have been playing really well, and if I keep playing like that, then I'm going to start winning again.''
 

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Discussion Starter #37
CODE CALL TAKES SHINE OFF TURNBULL VICTORY
Alan Clarkson
January 9, 1987
Sydney Morning Herald

Wendy Turnbull was close to tears when she was given a code of conduct warning during her straight sets win over her doubles partner and top seed Hana Mandlikova in the third round of the Family Circle NSW Open at White City yesterday.

At a critical stage in the second set, after she had broken to lead 2-1, the central umpire told Turnbull she had been reported by a linesman for making a gesture with her hand.

Turnbull objected to the charge and told the umpire she had not made any gesture.

"I didn't do anything," she retorted.

Turnbull admitted later that she had been on the verge of crying over the incident.

"I will give $1 million to anyone who can show that I made any sort of gesture with my hand," she said.

"Do they think I am crazy to do such a thing, especially on national television? I didn't do it - it's as simple as that."

After the match Turnbull spoke to Mandlikova's coach, Betty Stove, who agreed there had been no gesture from the Australian.

From the stand it was also apparent that nothing had been done to earn Turnbull the warning.

Despite being unsettled, Turnbull produced a consistent brand of tennis to topple the out-of-touch Mandlikova 6-3 7-5.

Her effort was far more impressive than her victory over Nicole Provis on Wednesday.

She served well, particularly on the big points, and hit some glorious forehands to fend off the pace of Mandlikova's shots.

Mandlikova had a chance to level the scores when she served for the set at 5-3 but lost it basically through a couple of double faults.

"I think it's always difficult to play your doubles partner because you get to know each other's game," Turnbull said after the match.

"I think I put pressure on her today and I played much better than I have been. I think I was mentally tougher when it came down to the big points.

"It was tough on Hana to play after winning in Brisbane. It was a hectic time for her."

It was the second time in as many matches that Turnbull had beaten Mandlikova, who is now ranked fourth in the world, 15 places ahead of the Australian.

The last time was in the fourth round of the US Open when the Australian won in three sets.

In Brisbane last week Turnbull was beaten in the opening round of the Queensland Open and this spurred her to get back into the rhythm of practice.

She had her family around her and she had been distracted by a number of telephone calls from friends welcoming her home.

Mandlikova's form yesterday was poor in contrast to her brilliant performance on Wednesday.

She played badly and was the first to admit it.

"I was not hitting great shots at all," she said in her usual straight-from-the-shoulder assessment of her game.

"I think I was playing very poorly today. I would not call it up and down. I would just call it bad play - that's all."

Later, Mandlikova and Turnbull joined forces in a strong display to beat Manon Bollegraf and Helen Kelesi 6-1 6-2 in the doubles.

Yesterday's other third-round singles matches went as scheduled with an interesting blend of newcomers and experienced players making their way into the quarter-finals.

Turnbull will play the serve-and-volley artist Lori McNeil, Helena Sukova meets tough opponent Zina Garrison, Bulgaria's Manuela Maleeva plays the Japanese surprise packet, Etsuko Inoue, and Catarina Lindqvist meets second seed Pam Shriver.

Shriver said yesterday she was a little "hacked off" after tournament officials requested that another singles match be slotted in before she was due to play.

Shriver was down to play in the third match but there was a minor panic when Anna Maria Fernandez had to forfeit to Sukova because of a back injury after only eight games.

It meant a sudden shortening of the program and a hasty transfer of the Maleeva-Anne Smith match from an outside court to the centre court.

"The deal was if Hana and Wendy's match went to three sets the schedule would stay as it was," Shriver said.

"But if it was over in two sets the other match would go on before ours.

"I kept watching the black clouds coming over so when I went on the court I was battling a bad mood."

Shriver realises she faces a tough match today against baseliner Lindqvist which could force her to stay back and use more ground strokes.

She says she is on target and desperately wants to win in Sydney to erase the memory of the final she lost to Turnbull in 1980 when she held six match points only to lose them - some through her own errors.

"My mind is finally mended after that. The twitch left me last year," she said with that infectious smile.

Despite a swirling wind yesterday Shriver was far too strong for Gretchen Rush and she won 6-3 6-0.

In other matches, Lindqvist beat Dinky van Rensburg 7-5 7-5, Manuela Maleeva toppled Anne Smith 7-5 6-1 and Inoue beat Victoria's Anne Minter 6-4 2-6 6-4.
 

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Tennis: Turnbull repeats her US Open victory over eminent partner
The Times
London, England
January 9, 1987
BARRY WOOD, SYDNEY

Hana Mandlikova has described her doubles partner Wendy Turnbull as being like a good wine, growing better as she grows older. Last week in Brisbane that might have been in doubt as the 34-year-old Australian expired with hardly a whimper against Heather Ludloff.

Yesterday, Miss Turnbull bounced back by defeating Miss Mandlikova, the top seed, 6-3, 7-5 in the third round of the Family Circle New South Wales women's open tournament here. It was the second victory in succession for Miss Turnbull over the Czechoslovak, the last upset occuring in the US Open in September.

It was another of those erratic performance from Miss Mandlikova that we used to witness with depressing regularity but which have now become a rarity. Several brilliant points would be followed by a string of elementary errors. That is how it was but Miss Mandlikova did not see it the same way.

'I think I was playing very poorly and I wouldn't even call it up and down. I would just call it bad play,' she stated.

If Miss Mandlikova was distraught now that her preparations for the Australian Open have been disrupted then she hid it well. 'I am disappointed that I lost but I am not going to die because of it,' she said. 'Wendy played very well and I didn't serve very well. It was just a day that she didn't miss anything. She really mixes up her shots a lot and sometimes her serve is so soft it's difficult to do anything off it.'

Miss Mandlikova believed she had received some of the backlash of Miss Turnbull's defeat last week. 'I think that helped her mentally because she realized she had to work a little bit harder than she had been and she was probably little more eager than I was.'

Miss Turnbull admitted the defeat last week had been an incentive to do well. 'It made me more determined,' she agreed. 'I was mentally tougher when it came down to the tight points.'

There were no other upsets, although the Swedish No 1, Catarina Lindqvist, was threatened by Dinky van Rensberg before pulling through 7-5, 7-5. For the second seed, Pam Shriver, and third seed, Helena Sukova, things were much easier. Miss Shriver lost only three games against Gretchen Rush, describing the second set - in which she lost just five points - as the best she had ever played.

Miss Sukova was on court only 27 minutes before Anna Maria Fernandez retired with a back injury.

THIRD ROUND: W Turnbull (Aus) bt H Mandlikova (Cz), 6-3, 7-5; P Shriver (US) bt G Rush (US), 6-3, 6-1; C Lindqvist (Swe) bt D Van Rensberg (SA) 7-5, 7-5; E Inoue (Jap) bt A Minter (Aus), 6-4, 2-6, 6-4; H Sukova (Cz) bt A M Fernandez (US), 5-2 (ret); H Maleeva (Bul) bt A Smith (US), 7-5, 6-1.
 

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January 8, 1987
United Press International

SYDNEY, Australia -- Wendy Turnbull Thursday brushed aside top-seed Hana Mandlikova in straight sets in the third round of the $150,000 New South Wales Open Tennis Championships at White City.

Turnbull, 34, of Australia, crushed the 24-year-old Czechoslovakian 6-3, 7-5 in an 80-minute match.

After the match, Mandlikova did not seem to be ruffled by her loss.

''I am disappointed to lose the match, but I am not going to die,'' she said. ''It was a day when she didn't miss anything.''

Mandlikova's thoughts quickly turned to her major mission in Australia -- challenging Martina Navratilova next week's for the Australian Open singles title.

''I will now be fit for the Open. I have played a lot of matches in the last couple of weeks and I was a little tired,'' she said.

Turnbull, the tournament's 10th seed, will meet Californian Lori McNeil, seeded 7th, in the quarterfinals Friday.

Turnbull kept Mandlikova pinned to the baseline with deep service returns and forced the Czechoslovakian into hurrying her shots as the chunky Turnbull moved in behind her service for the volley.

Pam Shriver of Lutherville, Md., posted a no-nonsense 6-3, 6-0 win over Gretchen Rush of Mt. Lebanon, Pa., on center court. Shriver was a finalist in the Sydney event in 1980 but has failed to reach the quarterfinal in three subsequent attempts.

Earlier, Anna Maria Fernandez of Torrance, Calif., was forced to default her match against Helena Sukova of Czechoslovakia because of a back injury sustained in the opening point of their match.

Sukova was leading 5-0 in the first set when Fernandez told the umpire she could not continue.

Sweden's Karina Lindqvist scored a straight-set victory over South African Dinky van Rensburg, and Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria made short work of Anne Smith of San Antonio, Texas, winning 7-5, 6-1.

Japan's No. 1 player, Etsuko Enoue, scored a hard fought 6-4, 2-6, 6-4 triumph over Australian Anne Minter to claim a quarterfinal spot.
 

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Tennis: McEnroe withdraws
The Times
London, England
January 9, 1987
BARRY WOOD, SYDNEY

John McEnroe, who has never felt at ease on his visits to Australia, has pulled out of the Ford Australian Open, beginning in Melbourne next week (Barry Wood writes).

The former world No 1, who is still in the process of re-establishing himself among the top ranks after the lengthy hiatus from the tennis circuit during 1986, has aggravated a recurring back injury while practising on grass in Palm Springs and has been advised by his doctor not to play.

McEnroe's absence adds to his first round dismissal at last year's US Open and ensures the spotlight remains firmly on Ivan Lendl and Boris Becker. The West German has failed to live up to expectations so far on the grass courts of Australia but his chances of claiming at least one title has been enhanced by his decision to play mixed doubles with Martina Navratilova.

'It was originally my friend, Judy Nelson's, idea and we started discussing it at the US Open,' Miss Navratilova revealed. 'We've talked about it on and off several times since and now I am really looking forward to it. It should be fun.'
 
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